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Women Wading Through the Web: providing women with the tools to evaluate online health information [5 Aud 1100 Mitchell]
 

Women Wading Through the Web: providing women with the tools to evaluate online health information [5 Aud 1100 Mitchell]

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Women Wading Through the Web: providing women with the tools to evaluate online health information [5 Aud 1100 Mitchell] Women Wading Through the Web: providing women with the tools to evaluate online health information [5 Aud 1100 Mitchell] Presentation Transcript

  • Mitchell, S. Women Wading Through the Web: providing women with the tools to evaluate online health information
    • This slideshow, presented at Medicine 2.0’08 , Sept 4/5 th , 2008, in Toronto, was uploaded on behalf of the presenter by the Medicine 2.0 team
    • Do not miss the next Medicine 2.0 congress on 17/18th Sept 2009 ( www.medicine20congress.com )
    • Order Audio Recordings (mp3) of Medicine 2.0’08 presentations at http://www.medicine20congress.com/mp3.php
    • Women Wading Through the Web:
    • providing women with the tools to
    • evaluate online health information
    • Sheryl Mitchell
    • Director, Women’s Health Partnerships
    • Women’s College Hospital
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    • “ The greater availability of health information via the Internet will lead to the emergence of more informed patients who are better able to assess the risks and benefits of different treatments for themselves.”
    • Source: Henwood, et al. Ignorance is bliss sometimes: constraints on the emergence of the ‘informed patient’ in the changing landscapes of health information. Sociology Health and Illness. 2003.
    • There is ample evidence to suggest that consumers are having difficulty properly assessing the quality of online
    • health information.
  • Eysenbach lab study: 2002
    • Participants asked to search for answers to specific health questions.
    • Prior to the search participants identified relevant factors (e.g. source, credentials, citations)
    • None checked About Us section or disclaimers.
    • Most spent only a minute per site.
    • None used medical gateway sites or those of medical societies or libraries.
    • Most were not clear on how to use a search engine effectively .
    • Source: Eysenbach G, et al. Empirical studies assessing the quality of health information for consumers on the world wide web: a systematic review. JAMA. 2002.
  • PEW Online Health Report: 2006
    • When seeking online health information, 75% rarely or never checked the source and date of information.
    • Pew Internet and American Life Project
    • Online Health Report, 2006
  • PEW Online Health Report: 2006
    • About 25% were overwhelmed by the amount of information they found.
    • 22% were frustrated by lack of relevant information or their inability to locate it.
    • Almost 20% were confused by the information.
    • 10% were frightened by the serious and/or graphic information they found.
    • Pew Internet and American Life Project
    • Online Health Report, 2006
  • PEW Online Health Report: 2006
    • Nevertheless, when asked to evaluate their online health information search:
    • 75% felt reassured that they could make appropriate health care decisions.
    • 56% felt relieved or comforted by the information they found.
    • 50% were eager to share the information they found with others.
    • Pew Internet and American Life Project
    • Online Health Report, 2006
  • Center for Studying Health System Change Report: 2008
    • “ Many consumers report positive effects from online health information—effects such as increased understanding of conditions and treatments and a changed approach toward maintaining their own health.”
    • Source: Center for Studying Health System Change. Striking Jump in Consumers Seeking Health Care Information , August 2008.
  • Center for Studying Health System Change Report: 2008
    • These self-reported assessments may not represent actual improvements in consumer health behaviors or knowledge.
    • Consumers may not be taking a sufficiently critical approach to the information and may have difficulty processing information correctly.
    • While most information seekers feel empowered by the health information they find, some may be misled by less valid or credible sources.
    • Source: Center for Studying Health System Change. Striking Jump in Consumers Seeking Health Care Information , August 2008.
  • The Verdict
    • Concerns about the credibility of online health information and the ability of consumers to assess its reliability are especially relevant.
    • Consumers who use online health information resources are at serious risk for obtaining, and acting upon, false and misleading information.
    • As online health information providers we can play a crucial role in supporting consumers’ health information seeking efforts.
  • Women Wading Through the Web Project
    • Literature Review
    • Toolkit Development
    • Focus groups:
    • i) health librarians re: Toolkit accuracy and the best way to promote it to their clients;
    • ii) women consumers re: Toolkit content usefulness and the best way to promote it; and
    • iii) local women’s health organizations about the best way to promote the Kit to their constituents/clients.
    • Web community
  • Criteria for Assessing Health Websites
    • We reviewed published criteria for evaluating online health information and found that many authors agree on key criteria for evaluating health-related websites.
    • We found considerable agreement amongst experts regarding the elements that make up ‘good’ online health information websites, both in terms of content and structure.
  • Criteria for Assessing Health Websites – Expert Perspective
    • Accountability
    • Accuracy
    • Authorship/attribution/authority
    • Completeness
    • Currency
    • Disclaimer
    • Disclosure
    • Objectivity or Balance
    • Privacy
    • Readability
    • Relevance
    • Usability/Accessibility/User-Friendliness
  • Criteria for Assessing Health Websites – Consumer Perspective
    • Content: Authoritative info/balanced
    • Citation of scientific references
    • Currency
    • Trustworthiness: organization that they’ve heard of
    • Pharma sites not credible; government sites more credible
    • Design: uncluttered; visually appealing; understandable language
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  • Women Wading Through the Web Toolkit Components
    • How to use the Internet to search for health information
    • How to judge the quality of a website
    • How to interpret medical research
    • How to understand media and web-based health information
    • Recommended websites
  • How to Use the Internet to Search for Health Information
    • Search engines
    • How to use a search engine
    • Subject directories
    • Health portals and specialty health sites
    • Trusted websites
    • The deep web
  • How to Judge the Quality of a Website
    • Who is responsible for the website?
    • What is the purpose of the website?
    • Can I understand the website?
    • Is the information accurate, objective and trustworthy?
    • How current is the information?
    • Does the website respect my privacy?
  • How to Interpret Medical Research
    • Types of research studies
    • Research on complementary and alternative medicine
    • Guidelines for evaluating research
    • What do those numbers and risk factors mean?
    • Finding research papers
    • Abstracts and full text of research studies
  • How to understand media and web-based health information
    • First questions
    • Media reports on health information and research studies
    • Web-based reports on health information and research studies
    • Other web-based sources of health information and news
    • Go online. Use common sense.
    • Be skeptical.
  • Contact Information
    • [email_address]
    • womenshealthmatters.ca