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Modern FreeBSD (at Opentech 2010)
 

Modern FreeBSD (at Opentech 2010)

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Outline of modern elements in FreeBSD 8. ...

Outline of modern elements in FreeBSD 8.

See Section 4c of

http://www.ukuug.org/events/opentech2010/schedule

for audio for the session. This presentation starts around the 20 minute mark.

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  • - embedded now uses similar technologies to servers <br /> - SMP dominance - (which motivates SMPng, GCD, ...) <br /> - ZFS and UFS improvements <br /> - we&apos;ve lead the way in identifying how open source projects should run, and what they should do, but have done a lot of experimentation to get there <br />
  • 1:1 - simplifying scheduler data&#xA0;structures and <br /> allowing them to use more complex heuristics <br />
  • GCD - a new concurrent programming framework, answers mapping of M:N to 1:1 <br /> we switched from M:N to 1:1 to simply the scheduler / threading code, and because it appeared that application writers were generally choosing to use small thread pools (say, 2-100 threads) rather than using very large numbers. In part because Linux used 1:1 and you couldn&apos;t get it to create very large thread counts <br />
  • Apple&#x2019;s FreeBSD-derived iOS on iPhone and Ipad <br /> FreeBSD-derived JunOS running on low-power switches <br />
  • Recent work on algorithms and approaches that scale to high core counts through <br /> complex work distribution, and hardware-assisted work distribution on high-performance network cards <br />
  • 1. as benchmarks over the last few years have shown, and we continue to aggressively exploit new parallelism. &#xA0; <br /> 2. and our kernel memory allocator has recently been updated to introduce NUMA-awareness. <br />
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  • 1. for many evolving applications such as firewall appliances and smartphones. <br /> <br />
  • 3. Most recently, we&apos;ve announced the Capsicum project, developed in collaboration with Google, to support capability-oriented OS security. <br /> 4. capiscum cutting edge, best paper <br />
  • 64-bit support <br /> snapshots <br /> background file system checking <br /> extended attributes <br /> advanced security features such as ACLs and MAC <br /> and most recently, journaling <br /> 2. allows easily pluggable and extensible storage transforms, <br /> * storage multipathing <br /> * new RAID integration <br /> * full file-system journaling and <br /> * replication for fault tolerance. &#xA0; <br /> 3. with its self-healing and management features <br />
  • 1. we even have our own Prevent server system and actively re-analyze our source code nightly. &#xA0; <br /> 2. offering introspection tools for performance and behavioural analysis <br /> 3. allows similar analysis of userspace applications the FreeBSD foundation is sponsoring Rui Paulo to complete this. <br /> 4. make FreeBSD one of the best OS platforms for kernel feature development, including <br /> a. integrated debugging <br /> b. dynamic lock order analysis <br /> Talked to many developers who actually write their Linux kernel code on FreeBSD so that they can use the debugging tools, before&#xA0;porting to Linux! <br />
  • Commercial vendors have always done this: NetApp, Juniper, Apple, Isilon, Panasas, ... <br /> <br />
  • 1. Dealing with project growth has been a critical challenge, both socially and technically. &#xA0; <br /> 1a. A social experiment that has proven extremely successful, allowing us to renew project leadership over time. <br /> 2. Roughly ten years ago, we moved for the first time to an <br /> 3. including the very interesting SMPng project, which involved dozens of developers (and companies) collaborating to improve multiprocessor scalability. <br /> 4. &#xA0;in which chartered teams take responsibility for portions of the project&apos;s work: release engineering, application porting, security advisories, system adminstration, bug-busting, documentation, etc, <br /> 5. Moving away from the idea&#xA0;that a small "core team" of developers does it all. <br /> 6. CVS: many extensions --> Subversion: few extensions <br /> 7. as a way to improve our branched development methodology for <br /> side-projects with long&#xA0;life cycles, as well as <br /> supporting dozens of summer students each year&#xA0;sponsored by Google <br /> 8. Our most <br /> recent developer summit at BSDCan 2010 in Ottawa had over 100 attendees <br /> including developers and invited guests from various companies. &#xA0;That&apos;s a good <br /> bit bigger than the 15-20 (?) folks at the first developer summit at the 2001 <br /> USENIX ATC in Boston. <br /> 9. Warner&#x2019;s audit of all involved licenses should be <br /> mentioned also. <br /> <br />
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Modern FreeBSD (at Opentech 2010) Modern FreeBSD (at Opentech 2010) Presentation Transcript