Writer: The Lathe of Heaven
<ul><li>Ursula Kroeber was born in 1929 in Berkeley, California, where she grew up. Her parents were the anthropologist Al...
<ul><li>Most of Le Guin's major titles have remained continuously in print, some for over forty years. Her best known fant...
<ul><li>  Three of Le Guin's books have been finalists for the American Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, and among the m...
<ul><li>  Many critical and academic studies of Le Guin's work have been written, including books by Elisabeth Cummins, Ja...
<ul><li>The Lathe of Heaven  is a 1971 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin. The plot revolves around a character wh...
<ul><li>Though technology plays a minor role, the novel is largely concerned with philosophical questions about our desire...
<ul><li>Incredible Good Fortune: New Poems  (Shambhala 2006); the  Annals of the Western Shore:   Gifts , (Harcourt 2004, ...
“ Lavinia has no feminist ax to grind, but immortality has given her a lot of time to think and she wants to set the recor...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Ursula k2

1,231

Published on

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,231
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ursula k2

  1. 1. Writer: The Lathe of Heaven
  2. 2. <ul><li>Ursula Kroeber was born in 1929 in Berkeley, California, where she grew up. Her parents were the anthropologist Alfred Kroeber and the writer Theodora Kroeber, author of Ishi . She went to Radcliffe College and did graduate work at Columbia University. She married Charles A. Le Guin, a historian, in Paris in 1953; they have lived in Portland, Oregon, since 1958, and have three children and four grandchildren. </li></ul><ul><li>Ursula K. Le Guin writes both poetry and prose, and in various modes including realistic fiction, science fiction, fantasy, young children's books, books for young adults, screenplays, essays, verbal texts for musicians, and voicetexts. She has published seven books of poetry, twenty-two novels, over a hundred short stories (collected in eleven volumes), four collections of essays, twelve books for children, and four volumes of translation. Few American writers have done work of such high quality in so many forms. </li></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Most of Le Guin's major titles have remained continuously in print, some for over forty years. Her best known fantasy works, the six Books of Earthsea , have sold millions of copies in America and England, and have been translated into sixteen languages. Her first major work of science fiction, The Left Hand of Darkness , is considered epoch-making in the field for its radical investigation of gender roles and its moral and literary complexity. Her novels The Dispossessed and Always Coming Home redefine the scope and style of utopian fiction, while the realistic stories of a small Oregon beach town in Searoad show her permanent sympathy with the ordinary griefs of ordinary people. Among her books for children, the Catwings series has become a particular favorite. Her version of Lao Tzu's Tao Te Ching , a translation she worked on for forty years, has received high praise. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li> Three of Le Guin's books have been finalists for the American Book Award and the Pulitzer Prize, and among the many honors her writing has received are a National Book Award, five Hugo Awards, five Nebula Awards, SFWA's Grand Master, the Kafka Award, a Pushcart Prize, the Howard Vursell Award of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, the L.A. Times Robert Kirsch Award, the PEN/Malamud Award, the Margaret A. Edwards Award, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Le Guin has taken the risk of writing seriously and with rigorous artistic control in forms some consider sub-literary. Critical reception of her work has rewarded her courage with considerable generosity. Harold Bloom includes her among his list of classic American writers. Grace Paley, Carolyn Kizer, Gary Snyder, and John Updike have praised her work. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li> Many critical and academic studies of Le Guin's work have been written, including books by Elisabeth Cummins, James Bittner, B.J. Bucknall, J. De Bolt, B. Selinger, K.R. Wayne, D.R. White, an early bibliography by Elizabeth Cummins Cogell and a continuation of the bibliography by David S. Bratman. </li></ul><ul><li>Le Guin leads an intensely private life, with sporadic forays into political activism and steady participation in the literary community of her city. Having taught writing workshops from Vermont to Australia, she is now retired from teaching. She limits her public appearances mostly to the West Coast. </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>The Lathe of Heaven is a 1971 science fiction novel by Ursula K. Le Guin. The plot revolves around a character whose dreams alter reality. It has been adapted into two television films. The novel was nominated for a Hugo Award and a Nebula Award, and won the Locus Poll Award for best novel in 1972. It first appeared serialized in the magazine Amazing Stories. </li></ul>
  7. 7. <ul><li>Though technology plays a minor role, the novel is largely concerned with philosophical questions about our desire to control our destiny, with Haber's positivist approach pitted against a Taoist equanimity. The beginnings of the chapters also feature quotes from H.G. Wells, Victor Hugo and Taoist sages. Due to its portrayal of psychologically-derived alternate realities, it has often been described as Le Guin's homage to Philip K. Dick. </li></ul><ul><li>The book is very critical of psychiatry. Orr, a deceptively mild yet very strong and honest man, is labeled sick because he is immensely frightened by his ability to change reality. He is forced to undergo therapy whether he wants to or not. His efforts to rid himself of Haber are viewed as suspect because he is a psychiatric patient. Haber, meanwhile, is very charming, extroverted, and confident, yet it is he who eventually goes insane and almost destroys reality. He dismisses Orr's qualms about meddling with reality with paternalistic psychobabble, and is more concerned with his machine and Orr's powers than with curing his patient. </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Incredible Good Fortune: New Poems (Shambhala 2006); the Annals of the Western Shore: Gifts , (Harcourt 2004, paperback edition 2006); Voices (Harcourt, September 2006), and Powers, (Harcourt, September 2007); Lavinia (Harcourt, April 2008). </li></ul>
  9. 9. “ Lavinia has no feminist ax to grind, but immortality has given her a lot of time to think and she wants to set the record straight.” — Susan Balée, Philadelphia Inquirer
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×