How sci fi has influenced technology

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How sci fi has influenced technology

  1. 1. How Science Fiction has Influenced Technology
  2. 2. Introduction <ul><li>The Science Fiction genre is responsible for some of today’s most sophisticated technologies, such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Artificial Skin </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Telemedicine Consultations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pressure Sensing Contact Lenses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>gCubik </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wasp Knife </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Artificial Skin <ul><li>What it is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A process that involves artificially growing skin directly on the body. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where it came from: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It is similar to the “uniflesh” in Frank Herbert’s The Dosadi Experiments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Uniflesh – a type of artificial skin and underlying flesh </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Harvey Dent… … could use some artificial skin
  5. 5. Telemedicine Consultation <ul><li>What it is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A way for doctors to consult with their patients from a remote location. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where it came from: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A telemedicine apparatus was first used in E.M. Forster’s The Machine Stops in 1909 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Telemedicine Apparatus – A device that allows physicians to aid or examine patients from a distance. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>What it is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A contact lens made out of </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>that can sense pressure. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where it came from: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Scleral contact lenses with </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>embedded circuitry were used in </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Larry Nivens and Steven Barns story The California Voodoo Game in 1992. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Smart contact lenses with embedded circuitry were used in Verner Vinges story Fast Times at Fairmont High in 2001. </li></ul></ul>Pressure Sensing Contact Lens
  7. 7. gCubik <ul><li>What it is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A cube that is capable of </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>displaying three-dimensional </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>images. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where it came from: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A “stereo tank” was used in Robert </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Heinlein’s story Stranger in a </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strange Land in 1961 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stereo Tank – A receiver for three- </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>dimensional televised images. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>A handheld projector was used for the </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>plans of the Death Star in The Empire </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strikes Back </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>What it is: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A knife that contains a </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>small canister of deadly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>gas in its handle. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Where it came from: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>A “Short-Wave Surgical Knife” was used in Eric Frank Russell’s 1953 novel Boomerang </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Short-Wave Surgical Knife – A knife capable of creating an internal cut without breaking the skin. </li></ul></ul></ul>Wasp Knife
  9. 9. Source <ul><li>Technovelgy </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.technovelgy.com </li></ul></ul>

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