• Like
  • Save
Housing Developer Social Media
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Housing Developer Social Media

  • 134 views
Uploaded on

An initial overview with a national housing developer on use of social media. The concerns for using social media in the housing market and the possible steps to take next.

An initial overview with a national housing developer on use of social media. The concerns for using social media in the housing market and the possible steps to take next.

More in: Business , Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
134
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • Reputation
  • Example of content they already have
  • Looking back at this slide…..how can we make sure that content stretches across the different departments?

Transcript

  • 1. Social Media Concerns & Steps HOUSING DEVELOPER
  • 2. What opportunities does social bring? • Reach wider audiences • Improve rankings, ratings and SEO • Increase brand engagement • Build relationships with prospects and customers • Research and development • Build your voice of authority and ownership in the housing market • Be ahead of your competitors
  • 3. HOUSING DEVELOPER Concerns
  • 4. What concerns should I consider? • Reputation • Security • Time • Content • Organisational buy-in
  • 5. Manage your reputation • Our networks are bigger • Check reviews regularly • Thank publically on your social channels • Apologise publically on your social channels (we‟re only human after all) • Retweet, repin and like positive comments • Claim your venues on Foursquare, Facebook, Places etc. • Keep your brand voice consistent • Create brand guidelines and policies • Have a crisis management plan • Prepare pre-planned scenario responses (accidents/fatalities on construction site, issues with parking, snagging, boilers exploding etc.) • Listen and monitor • 61% of world class brands have a dedicated social media strategist/manager • 45% of world class brands create content specifically for social media Source: Weber Shandwick and Forbes Insights 2011
  • 6. Security • Using third party tools prevents direct access to account information and gives you greater control • Change passwords periodically • Develop policies and train those who are going to contribute • Tools allow you to monitor sensitive content being posted on your social networks
  • 7. Time • Determine internal versus external support • Make your audiences aware about when you‟re going to be monitoring your channels (manage expectations) • Involve the wider organisation • Use tools to schedule content delivery
  • 8. Content • Develop a content plan and prepare as much as possible in advance – Video and infographics – Facebook applications – Competitions – Polls and questions – Seasonal campaigns – News stories – Competitions – Events, public exhibitions • Produce original and unique content • Share user generated content • Retweeting, sharing, repining information from employees • Engage in conversations; answer questions and give advice • It‟s bigger than Facebook and twitter
  • 9. “Are new homes more energy efficient?” “How much will it cost me to heat my new house?” “Should I buy a new or old house?”
  • 10. Organisational buy-in Make people part of the process • Employees are your biggest advocates • Listen to their ideas • Give them access to the right tools • Lead from the top (CEO blog?)
  • 11. Bovis Homes Next Steps
  • 12. Social media takes two things: Bravery and Budget
  • 13. Take it in steps 1. Build the social infrastructure 2. Understand the landscape 3. Build a strategy 4. Train your people 5. Launch campaign 6. Tweaking, amending and support
  • 14. Social Infrastructure
  • 15. Corporate Comms Northern Sales & Marketing SE Region Sales & Marketing SW Region Sales & Marketing SWales Region Sales & Marketing Central Region Sales & Marketing
  • 16. Content Social Media Blogs, stories, responses to questions, videos, seeding, responses to consultation and construction queries Customer service Responding to issues eg snagging, car parking etc, construction issues Sales Purchaser questions, open days, events, campaign follow-up, images, plans, offers, development updates Marketing Campaigns, surveys, e-mail marketing, pay-per-click Central Mktg / Comms Corporate updates, financial/city updates, reputation management PR Corporate and regional news, business profile, awards, reputation management, CSR
  • 17. Building a strategy
  • 18. Building a strategy • What you are trying to achieve • How you will measure success • What resources will be required (internal and external) • Roadmap to the future • Small steps… …pick a region
  • 19. Strategic frameworks Centralised Social media policy and strategy derives from a single department or person. Often a higher-level department in the organisation. Features: • Consistent • Not seen as really authentic • Slow Distributed Less coordinated than Centralised. At department-level, solutions and initiatives can be decided and implemented for the sake of message authenticity. This also ensures a higher responsibility to the departments / individuals. Features: • Organic growth • Authentic • Experimental • Not coordinated Hub-and-spoke Tactical framework comes from the centre. Implementation is executed in the decentralised units. Features: • Policies and procedures come from a central point (often high- level) • Spreads across the complete organisation • Takes time Multiple Hub- and-spoke Similar to the hub and spoke environment. Decisions are made at a product-, brand- or unit-level, which are then coordinated at the same level. Features: • Rules and procedures are decentralised from multiple points • Spreads across the complete organisation • Takes time Holistic Each individual within the organisation has the freedom to engage in social media initiatives. Not just „experimenting for ourselves‟ it is an holistic approach, where individual actions are coordinated. Features: • Each employee is empowered • Unlike organic, employees are organised
  • 20. Elements of a social business strategy Planning Presence Engagement Formalised Strategic Converged Listen to learn Stake our claim Dialogue deepens relationships Organic for scale Become a social business Business is social Goal Understand how customers and prospects use social channels Prioritise strategic goals where social can have the most impact Amplify existing marketing activity Encourage sharing Drive considerations to purchase Provide direct support Internal employee engagement Set governance for social Create discipline & processes Strategic business goals Scale across business units Scales into sales, customer service, HR, finance, supply chain Senior level involvement Social drives transformation Integrates social philosophy into all aspects of the organisation Metrics Mentions Sentiment Share of voice Fans, followers, shares Brand metrics Traffic Path to purchase Lower support costs Customer satisfaction Process efficiency Link to department Business goals and ROI Enterprise metrics Deep analytics tied to functions & lines of business Insights lead to adaptive and predictive strategies Initiatives Listening / monitoring Internal audits Pilot Social content Risk management Training Campaigns & long- term programmes Social support communities Create centre of excellence Enter social network SMMs to scale employees Social is part of planning process Redefine processes Organisation-wide training One strategy process managed through disparate but complimentary teams and efforts Organisation &Resources Monitoring platform Part-time resources Agency support Dedicated manager Content management Social strategist Small dedicated teams SMMs Staffing up Common technology Investment CoE coordinates hubs Dedicated „spoke‟ head count Social is everyone‟s responsibility
  • 21. Launch Campaign
  • 22. Content Social Media Blogs, stories, good news, videos, seeding, responses to consultation and construction queries Customer service Responding to issues eg snagging, car parking etc, construction issues Sales Purchaser questions, open days, events, campaign follow-up, plans, offers, development updates Marketing Campaigns, surveys, e-mail marketing, pay-per-click Central Mktg/Comms Corporate updates, financial/city updates, reputation management PR Corporate and regional news, business profile, awards, reputation management, CSR
  • 23. Tweaking, amending and support • On-going support and training • Support with researching, writing and scheduling copy • Monitoring and evaluation • Training new staff • Developing new platforms
  • 24. Public Consultation • Case-by-case • Use diversion tactics to focus opposition • Identify and mobilise supporters
  • 25. HOUSING DEVELOPER Tools for the job
  • 26. Crowd Control • Set up and manage multiple social profiles • Audit trail for all content posted on behalf of the organisation • Ensure that password policies are robust to stop the „twitter hackings‟ • Allow multiple users across the organisation to feed content • Alerts about content by keywords are directed to specific individuals meaning you are aware with the ability to then respond • Content can be signed-off before it goes live • Collaborate as a team flagging content to the regions to enable a local response. • Set up timely alerts to ensure that both inbound and outbound content is flagged to teams / individuals. • Accessible via PC and mobile devices
  • 27. Monitoring tools • Google Alerts • Hootsuite • Advanced twitter search • Brandwatch • Facebook search • Social mentions
  • 28. Questions?