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To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
To kill a mockingbird
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To kill a mockingbird

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  • 1. 11 To Kill aTo Kill a MockingbirMockingbir dd By HarperBy Harper LeeLee
  • 2. 22 SettingSetting  Maycomb, AlabamaMaycomb, Alabama (fictional city)(fictional city)  1933-19351933-1935  Although slavery hasAlthough slavery has long been abolished,long been abolished, the Southerners inthe Southerners in Maycomb continue toMaycomb continue to believe in whitebelieve in white supremacy.supremacy.
  • 3. 33 ThemesThemes  Racial PrejudiceRacial Prejudice  Social SnobberySocial Snobbery  MoralityMorality  ToleranceTolerance  PatiencePatience  EqualityEquality  The Need for CompassionThe Need for Compassion  The Need for ConscienceThe Need for Conscience
  • 4. 44 SymbolismSymbolism  The Mockingbird: Symbolizes EverythingThe Mockingbird: Symbolizes Everything That is Good and Harmless in This WorldThat is Good and Harmless in This World  The mockingbird only sings to please othersThe mockingbird only sings to please others and therefore it is considered a sin to shoot aand therefore it is considered a sin to shoot a mockingbird. They are considered harmlessmockingbird. They are considered harmless creatures who give joy with their song.creatures who give joy with their song.  The mockingbird image or symbol appearsThe mockingbird image or symbol appears four times in the novel.four times in the novel.  Two characters in the novel symbolize theTwo characters in the novel symbolize the mockingbird: Tom Robinson & Boo Radley.mockingbird: Tom Robinson & Boo Radley.
  • 5. 55 Jean Louis Finch – “Scout”Jean Louis Finch – “Scout”  The story’s narratorThe story’s narrator  Although now anAlthough now an adult, Scout looksadult, Scout looks back at her childhoodback at her childhood and tells of theand tells of the momentous eventsmomentous events and influential peopleand influential people of those years.of those years.  Scout is six when theScout is six when the story begins.story begins.  She is naturallyShe is naturally curious about life.curious about life.
  • 6. 66 Scout’s Character TraitsScout’s Character Traits  TomboyTomboy  ImpulsiveImpulsive  EmotionalEmotional  Warm & FriendlyWarm & Friendly  SensitiveSensitive  AdorableAdorable  Gains in Maturity throughout the NovelGains in Maturity throughout the Novel
  • 7. 77 Atticus FinchAtticus Finch  Father of Scout and JemFather of Scout and Jem  A widowerA widower  An attorney by professionAn attorney by profession  Highly respectedHighly respected  Good citizenGood citizen  Instills good values and morals inInstills good values and morals in his children.his children.  His children call him “Atticus”His children call him “Atticus”  HonestHonest  Typical southern gentlemanTypical southern gentleman  BraveBrave  CourteousCourteous  Soft-spokenSoft-spoken
  • 8. 88 Jem FinchJem Finch Scout’s older brother Looks up to his father Atticus Usually looks out for Scout Typical older brother at times Smart Compassionate Matures as the story progresses
  • 9. 99 CalpurniaCalpurnia  The Finch’s blackThe Finch’s black housekeeperhousekeeper  Has watched the childrenHas watched the children since their mother’s deathsince their mother’s death  Has been a positiveHas been a positive influence on the children.influence on the children.
  • 10. 1010 Arthur “Boo” RadleyArthur “Boo” Radley  An enigmaAn enigma  An adult man, whose father has “sentenced”An adult man, whose father has “sentenced” him to a lifetime confinement to their househim to a lifetime confinement to their house because of some mischief he got into when hebecause of some mischief he got into when he was a teenager.was a teenager.  Has a reputation of being a lunaticHas a reputation of being a lunatic  Basically a harmless, well-meaning personBasically a harmless, well-meaning person  Sometimes childlike in behaviorSometimes childlike in behavior  Starving for love and affectionStarving for love and affection  Saves Jem and Scout from certain dangerSaves Jem and Scout from certain danger
  • 11. 1111 Tom RobinsonTom Robinson  A young, harmless,A young, harmless, innocent, hardworkinginnocent, hardworking black manblack man  Has a crippled leftHas a crippled left handhand  Married with threeMarried with three children. Works on achildren. Works on a farm belonging to Mr.farm belonging to Mr. Link Deas, a whiteLink Deas, a white manman  Will be falsely accusedWill be falsely accused of raping a white girl,of raping a white girl, Mayella EwellMayella Ewell
  • 12. 1212 DillDill  A close friend of JemA close friend of Jem and Scoutand Scout  Usually lives inUsually lives in Maycomb only duringMaycomb only during the summer (staysthe summer (stays with a relative)with a relative)  Tells “big stories”Tells “big stories”  Has been deprived ofHas been deprived of love and affectionlove and affection
  • 13. 1313 Two Poor White Families:Two Poor White Families: The Cunninghams The EwellsThe Cunninghams The Ewells  Poor white familyPoor white family  Hard-workingHard-working  HonestHonest  ProudProud  Survive on very littleSurvive on very little  Always pay back theirAlways pay back their debts – even if it isdebts – even if it is with hickory nuts,with hickory nuts, turnips, or holly.turnips, or holly.  Poor white trashPoor white trash  DirtyDirty  LazyLazy  Good-for-nothingGood-for-nothing  Never done a day’sNever done a day’s workwork  Foul-mouthedFoul-mouthed  DishonestDishonest  ImmoralImmoral
  • 14. 1414 The Black CommunityThe Black Community  SimpleSimple  HonestHonest  CleanClean  Hard-workingHard-working  God fearingGod fearing  ProudProud  Would never takeWould never take anything with paying itanything with paying it backback  RespectfulRespectful  Had stronger characterHad stronger character than most of the whitesthan most of the whites  OppressedOppressed  UneducatedUneducated  Discriminated againstDiscriminated against  Talked about badlyTalked about badly  Deserve better than whatDeserve better than what is dished out to them byis dished out to them by societysociety
  • 15. 1515 LanguageLanguage  Sometimes the language of Scout will be that of her as aSometimes the language of Scout will be that of her as a child; other times, she will be speaking in the voice of anchild; other times, she will be speaking in the voice of an adultadult  Atticus uses formal speechAtticus uses formal speech  Calpurnia uses “white language” in the Finch house andCalpurnia uses “white language” in the Finch house and switches to “black jargon” when amidst blacksswitches to “black jargon” when amidst blacks  The Ewells use foul words and obscenitiesThe Ewells use foul words and obscenities  Jem, Scout, and Dill will use slang words, typical of theirJem, Scout, and Dill will use slang words, typical of their ageage  Tom Robinson uses language typical of the southernTom Robinson uses language typical of the southern black such as “suh” for “sir” and “chillun” for “children”black such as “suh” for “sir” and “chillun” for “children”  Various derogatory terms for blacks will be used such asVarious derogatory terms for blacks will be used such as “nigger,” “darky,” “Negroes,” and “colored folk” – Lee“nigger,” “darky,” “Negroes,” and “colored folk” – Lee uses such language to keep her novel naturally in syncuses such language to keep her novel naturally in sync with common language of the timeswith common language of the times
  • 16. 1616 ToneTone SomberSomber SeriousSerious Humorous (at times)Humorous (at times)
  • 17. 1717 Harper LeeHarper Lee  She was born in 1926 in Monroeville,She was born in 1926 in Monroeville, Alabama (the fictional “Maycomb,Alabama (the fictional “Maycomb, Alabama”)Alabama”)  Her father “Amasa” was a lawyerHer father “Amasa” was a lawyer whom she deeply admiredwhom she deeply admired  Her mother’s maiden name wasHer mother’s maiden name was “Finch”“Finch”  Her own childhood mirrors that of theHer own childhood mirrors that of the character “Scout”character “Scout”  In 1960 she published her only novelIn 1960 she published her only novel – “To Kill a Mockingbird”– “To Kill a Mockingbird”  It received the Pulitzer Prize forIt received the Pulitzer Prize for Literature in 1961Literature in 1961  Since 1960, “To Kill a Mockingbird”Since 1960, “To Kill a Mockingbird” has never been out of printhas never been out of print  At age 81, she is alive and resides inAt age 81, she is alive and resides in New YorkNew York  She rarely makes publicShe rarely makes public appearances or gives interviewsappearances or gives interviews
  • 18. 1818 Life During the 1930sLife During the 1930s  Race RelationsRace Relations  Nine black teenagers are falselyNine black teenagers are falsely charged with raping two whitecharged with raping two white women in Scottsboro, Alabama;women in Scottsboro, Alabama; eight are convicted and sentencedeight are convicted and sentenced to deathto death  The U.S. Supreme Court reversesThe U.S. Supreme Court reverses their convictions because theirtheir convictions because their constitutional rights had beenconstitutional rights had been violatedviolated  The teens are tried for a secondThe teens are tried for a second time, and are again found guiltytime, and are again found guilty  The Supreme Court reverses theThe Supreme Court reverses the convictions againconvictions again  Eventually, four of the defendantsEventually, four of the defendants are freed; the other five serveare freed; the other five serve prison termsprison terms  The last Scottsboro defendantThe last Scottsboro defendant was paroled in 1950was paroled in 1950  It was virtually impossible for aIt was virtually impossible for a black to receive a fair trialblack to receive a fair trial
  • 19. 1919 Life During the 1930sLife During the 1930s  The Great Depression sweepsThe Great Depression sweeps the nation – Many families dothe nation – Many families do not even have money for basicnot even have money for basic needs such as food, clothing,needs such as food, clothing, and shelter.and shelter.  The per capita income forThe per capita income for families in Alabama (andfamilies in Alabama (and Oklahoma) is $125 - $250 aOklahoma) is $125 - $250 a yearyear  Many southern blacks pickMany southern blacks pick cotton for a livingcotton for a living  Franklin D. Roosevelt isFranklin D. Roosevelt is PresidentPresident
  • 20. 2020 Life During the 1930sLife During the 1930s  Hitler is Chancellor of GermanyHitler is Chancellor of Germany  He believes that Jews, AfricanHe believes that Jews, African Americans, and other races are inferiorAmericans, and other races are inferior to Anglo-Saxons.to Anglo-Saxons.  In 1936, Jesse Owens, a black AmericanIn 1936, Jesse Owens, a black American athlete, traveled to Germany toathlete, traveled to Germany to participate in the Summer Olympics.participate in the Summer Olympics.  Owens’ biggest competitor in the longOwens’ biggest competitor in the long jump was a German named Luz Long.jump was a German named Luz Long.  Despite racial tensions, the two becameDespite racial tensions, the two became good friends.good friends.  Jesse Owens won the gold medal andJesse Owens won the gold medal and Long won the silver.Long won the silver.  Long was later killed during World WarLong was later killed during World War II, and Jesse Owens traveled back toII, and Jesse Owens traveled back to Germany to pay his respects when theGermany to pay his respects when the war was over.war was over.
  • 21. 2121 Legal Segregation in Alabama,Legal Segregation in Alabama, 1923-19401923-1940  No white female nurses inNo white female nurses in hospitals that treat black menhospitals that treat black men  Separate passenger cars forSeparate passenger cars for whites and blackswhites and blacks  Separate waiting rooms forSeparate waiting rooms for whites and blackswhites and blacks  Separation of white and blackSeparation of white and black convictsconvicts  Separate schoolsSeparate schools  No interracial marriagesNo interracial marriages  Segregated water fountainsSegregated water fountains  Segregated theatresSegregated theatres
  • 22. 2222 Morphine: A Southern Lady’s DrugMorphine: A Southern Lady’s Drug  1930s Typical1930s Typical Morphine Addict:Morphine Addict:  White femaleWhite female  Middle-aged or olderMiddle-aged or older  WidowedWidowed  HomeboundHomebound  Lives in the southLives in the south  Property ownerProperty owner  Began using morphineBegan using morphine for medical reasonsfor medical reasons (pain relief)(pain relief)  In “To Kill a Mockingbird,” the FinchIn “To Kill a Mockingbird,” the Finch children will become acquaintedchildren will become acquainted with a morphine addict named Mrs.with a morphine addict named Mrs. Dubose. Although only a fictitiousDubose. Although only a fictitious character, she personifies thecharacter, she personifies the American morphine addict of theAmerican morphine addict of the late nineteenth and early twentiethlate nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.centuries.
  • 23. 2323 This PowerPoint wasThis PowerPoint was created by Mrs. Wardcreated by Mrs. Ward especially for the 4especially for the 4thth Hour English I studentsHour English I students at Warner High School.at Warner High School. I hope you enjoy theI hope you enjoy the book!book!
  • 24. 2424 This powerpoint was kindly donated to www.worldofteaching.com http://www.worldofteaching.com is home to over a thousand powerpoints submitted by teachers. This is a completely free site and requires no registration. Please visit and I hope it will help in your teaching.

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