Sentence types

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  • Sentence types

    1. 1. FRIDAY, September 7, 2012Bellringer: Please answer in yourjournal:1. Journal Prompt (min 3 sentences)-What is the best advice you everreceived?2. What are the four basic kinds ofsentences?
    2. 2. Kinds of Sentences© Brent Coley 2008 | www.mrcoley.com
    3. 3. There are fourdifferent kinds of sentences.
    4. 4. Declarative SentenceA declarative sentencemakes a statement. It ends with a period.He likes pepperoni pizza. The umbrella is green.Mrs. Smith is a teacher.
    5. 5. Interrogative SentenceAn interrogative sentence asks a question. It ends with a question mark.Do you like pepperoni pizza?Have you seen my umbrella? Who is your teacher?
    6. 6. Exclamatory SentenceAn exclamatory sentence shows strong feeling. Itends with an exclamation point. Hooray! Wow! That’s great news!
    7. 7. Imperative SentenceAn imperative sentence gives a command. It ends with a period. Go to your room. Throw me the ball.Bob, please close the door.
    8. 8. Sentence Structure Sentence Types
    9. 9. Sentence Types • Simple • Compound • Complex
    10. 10. Basic Elements of Every SentenceSUBJECT PREDICATE
    11. 11. Basic ElementsSUBJECT PREDICATE Mary plays tennis.
    12. 12. SIMPLE SENTENCE SUBJECT PREDICATE Mary plays tennis.one subject one predicate
    13. 13. Simple Sentence Tom and Mary play tennis.Compound Subject &
    14. 14. Simple SentenceTom and Mary play tennis and swim.Compound Subject Compound Predicate & &
    15. 15. SIMPLE SENTENCE with compound subjectTom and Mary play tennis.
    16. 16. SIMPLE SENTENCE with compound subject and compound predicateTom and Mary play tennis and swim.
    17. 17. Hi,I’m Punctuation Pete!
    18. 18. SIMPLE SENTENCE with compound subject and compound predicateTom and Mary play tennis and swim. No comma before “and” in compound subjects and predicates!
    19. 19. Compound Sentence withCoordinating Conjunctions SUBJECT PREDICATE and SUBJECT PREDICATE
    20. 20. Compound Sentence Tom swims, andMary plays tennis.
    21. 21. COMPOUND SENTENCE:COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS FOR AND NOR BUT OR YET SO
    22. 22. COMPOUND SENTENCE: COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONSTom swims, and Mary plays tennis. Clause 1 Clause 2 Independent Independent
    23. 23. COMPOUND SENTENCE: COORDINATING CONJUNCTIONSTom swims, and Mary plays tennis. Comma before “and” in compound sentences!
    24. 24. COMPOUND SENTENCE: CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS MOREOVER HOWEVER OTHERWISE THEREFORE
    25. 25. COMPOUND SENTENCE: CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBSBob is handsome; moreover, he is rich. Clause 1 Clause 2 Independent Independent
    26. 26. COMPOUND SENTENCE: CONJUNCTIVE ADVERBS Bob is handsome; moreover, he is rich. Note: Semicolon before conjunctiveadverb and comma after conjunctive adverb!
    27. 27. Conjunctive Adverbs “float”• Conjunctive adverbs are sometimes called “floating” adverbs because they can be positioned at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of a clause.
    28. 28. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERB: AT THE BEGINNINGBob is handsome; moreover, he is rich.
    29. 29. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERB: IN THE MIDDLEBob is handsome; he is, moreover, rich.
    30. 30. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERB: IN THE MIDDLEBob is handsome; he is, moreover, rich. Note: Place commas before and after a conjunctive adverb in the middle!
    31. 31. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERB: AT THE ENDBob is handsome; he is rich, moreover.
    32. 32. CONJUNCTIVE ADVERB: AT THE ENDBob is handsome; he is rich, moreover. Note: Place a comma before a conjunctive adverb at the end!
    33. 33. Semicolons• “If the relation between the ideas expressed in the main clauses is very close and obvious without a conjunction, you can separate the clauses with a semicolon” (Little, Brown Handbook, 9th Edition, p. 361).
    34. 34. COMPOUND SENTENCE: SEMICOLONMatt has benefited from his exercise program; he is slim and energetic.
    35. 35. Complex SentenceSUBJECT PREDICATE even thoughSUBJECT PREDICATE
    36. 36. Complex SentenceBob is popular even thoughhe is ugly.
    37. 37. COMPLEX SENTENCE: SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONS EVEN THOUGH WHENADVERB CLAUSES BECAUSE UNLESS WHEREAS
    38. 38. COMPLEX SENTENCE: SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONSBob is popular even though he is ugly. Clause 1 Clause 2 Independent Dependent
    39. 39. COMPLEX SENTENCE: SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONSEven though Bob is ugly, he is popular. Clause 1 Clause 2 Dependent Independent
    40. 40. COMPLEX SENTENCE: SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONSBob is popular even though he is ugly. When the MAIN clause is first, it is usually NOT followed by a comma!
    41. 41. COMPLEX SENTENCE: SUBORDINATING CONJUNCTIONSEven though Bob is ugly, he is popular. When the ADVERB clause is first, it is followed by a comma!
    42. 42. Compound-Complex SentenceMike is popular becausehe is good looking, buthe is not very happy.
    43. 43. COMPOUND-COMPLEX SENTENCE: COMBINES BOTH TYPESMike is popular because he is good looking, but he is not very happy. Punctuate each clause according to its rules!
    44. 44. PunctuationReview!
    45. 45. SIMPLE SENTENCEMy friends and I play tennis and go bowlingevery weekend. No commas before “and” in compound subjects and predicates!
    46. 46. COMPOUND SENTENCE: Coordinating ConjunctionMen may exercise harder, but they may notexercise as regularly as women do. Comma before coordinating conjunction!
    47. 47. COMPOUND SENTENCE: Conjunctive AdverbNative and nonnative English speakers havedifferent needs; however, some schools fail todistinguish between these groups. Semicolon before conjunctive adverb Comma after conjunctive adverb!
    48. 48. COMPOUND SENTENCE: Conjunctive Adverb--in the middle Native and nonnative English speakers have different needs; some schools, however, fail to distinguish between these groups. Semicolon after first independent clause--Commas before and after conjunctive adverb!
    49. 49. COMPOUND SENTENCE: Conjunctive Adverb at the endNative and nonnative English speakers havedifferent needs; some schools fail to distinguishbetween these groups, however. Semicolon after first independent clause-- Comma before conjunctive adverb!
    50. 50. COMPLEX SENTENCE: Adverb Clauses--Subordinating Conjunction People had continuous moderate exercise when they had to hunt for food. When main clause is first,it is not usually followed by a comma!
    51. 51. COMPLEX SENTENCE: Adverb Clauses--Subordinating ConjunctionWhen people had to hunt for food, they hadcontinuous moderate exercise. When the adverb clause is first, it is followed by a comma!
    52. 52. ReferencesWriting Academic English, Second Edition, by AliceOshima and Ann Hogue. White Plains: Addison, Wesley,Longman, 1999.The Little, Brown Handbook, by H. Ramsey Fowler andJane E. Aaron, Pearson, 2004.
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