Postmodernism
William V. Ganis, PhD
Philip Johnson
AT&T Building (Sony Building)
New York, New York
1979
Philip Johnson
AT&T Building (Sony Building)
New York, New York
1979
Cindy Sherman
Untitled #54
1980
gelatin-silver print
8 x 10 in.
Cindy Sherman
Untitled #43
1979
gelatin-silver print
8 x 10 in.
Cindy Sherman
Untitled #92
1981
type-C print
24 x 48 in.
Cindy Sherman
Untitled #209
1989
type-C print
57 x 41 in.
Sherrie Levine
Untitled
(After Walker Evans)
1981
gelatin-silver print
10 x 8 in.
Sherrie Levine
Untitled
(After Alexsandr Rodchenko: 11)
1987
gelatin-silver print
20 x 16 in.
William Wegman
Fay Ray
1988
gelatin silver print
6 x 6 in.
William Wegman
Front Faade
1993
color Polaroid
24 x 20 in.
Andres Serrano
Nomad (Sir Leonard)
1990
Cibachrome print
edition of four
60 x 49 1/2 in.
Richard Prince
Untitled
(Three Women Looking in the Same
Direction)
1980
3 Ektacolor prints
40 x 60 in. each
Richard Prince
Bitches and Bastards
1985-86
Ektacolor print
86 x 48 in.
Richard Prince
Bitches and Bastards
1985-86
Ektacolor print
86 x 48 in.
Mike and Doug Starn
Blue Hands
1987
toned silver prints and tape
64 x 76 in.
Mike and Doug Starn
Horses (detail of installation)
1985-86
toned silver prints and tape
10 x 15 ft. overall
Mike and Doug Starn
Horses (detail of installation)
1985-86
toned silver prints and tape
10 x 15 ft. overall
Andy Warhol
Grace Jones
1984-86
9 gelatin-silver prints and thread
40 x 33 in.
Andy Warhol
World Trade Center
ca. 1986-87
6 gelatin-silver prints and thread
31 1/2 x 27 1/4 in.
Andy Warhol
Dollar Signs
1982
silkscreen ink and synthetic polymer paint on canvas
20 x 16 each
Allan McCollum
Plaster Surrogates
1983
enamel on solid-cast Hydrostone
Jeff Koons
Vacuum Cleaners:
New Hoover Deluxe Shampoo Polishers
1980
polishers in Plexiglas boxes with fluorescent lights
...
Jeff Koons
New Hoover Convertables, Green, Blue;
Double Decker
1981-87
Vacuum cleaners in Plexiglas boxes with fluorescent...
Jeff Koons
Rabbit
1986
stainless steel
41 x 19 x 12 in.
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Pomoart

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Found on this web site: http://iris.nyit.edu/arthistory/pptshows.html
I took the part of the photorealism out.

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  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • In this urban scene, Sherman looks a bit like Kim Novak. She turns her collar up against the cold, a sign of self-protection. Her weariness of her nocturnal urban surroundings is suggested by her expression and body language.
  • Here Sherman assumes the role of vulnerable woman in the desolate location or model in sublime locale.
  • In the ‘80s, Sherman started making color prints on a much larger scale. These works have much more presence in a gallery than the intimate black and white works. Notice that Sherman still assumes stereotypical roles, but these are no longer grounded in those from movies.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
    Later in the decade, Sherman drew her roles from art history. Here, she reconstructs the conventions of Italian Renaissance portraits, evoking the Mona Lisa among other famous works by RenaissanceBaroque artists. In these works, Sherman makes the constructions obvious, especially as she tries to make photography obey the rules of painting. Her costumes are often stiff and tactile, her make-up obvious and her colors heightened. These works are often the scale of portrait paintings to heighten the evocation.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
    Perhaps the most notorious artist of the ‘80s is Sherie Levine. She is well-know for her conceptual appropriation of the work of other artists, not just in quoting, but in re-presenting their works as her own.
    In this work, she simply rephotographs the work of the famous photographer Walker Evans. In doing this, she interrupts the idea of photographic originality and recasts her authorship onto the image, to reposition the creation of the work from a male photographer of the ‘30s who documented the living conditions of poor and migrant workers, to that of a female appropriator from the ‘80s.
  • Levine’s work is especially important given that vintage photographs became recognized in the art market place at about his time and prices began to take off.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • The Starn twins were among those artists who achived gallery presence by scaling artistic photography to the size of a gallery installation.
    Mike and Doug Starn called attention to the photographic medium by disrupting the traditionally pure display of prints. The Starn Twins allowed their prints to curl, tear, buckle and fade.
    Mike Starn pointed out, "there were 150 years of saying, ’the paper is sacred;’ and the Starns gained theoretical cachet by destroying this transcendent surface.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
    Richard Prince’s conceptual strategy for art making was to rephotograph images he found in popular print media, especially ads. He call to our attention the established practices of portrayal, showing how a similar pose is used among fashion models. These women not only face the same direction but in doing so allow us to observe them without their eyes meeting ours.
  • In this work, Prince reshoots images of heavy metal or hair bands from the eighties to expose similarities that when shown in multiple seem to be nothing more than packaging. These similarities are all the more powerful since these bands often covey the idea of nonconformity.
  • The best paradox of conformity to an image within the guise of non-conformity is embodied in the anarchy symbol tatoo.
  • The Starn twins were among those artists who achived gallery presence by scaling artistic photography to the size of a gallery installation.
    Mike and Doug Starn called attention to the photographic medium by disrupting the traditionally pure display of prints. The Starn Twins allowed their prints to curl, tear, buckle and fade.
    Mike Starn pointed out, "there were 150 years of saying, ’the paper is sacred;’ and the Starns gained theoretical cachet by destroying this transcendent surface.
  • Often they mounted multiples (either of the same image or prints making up a larger singular subject) with non-archival materials including cellophane tape.
    With these works the Starns displaced the association of photographic "truth" from the illusionistic window and revelation of descriptive information, to the facticity of materials.
  • In this detail it becomes obvious how the prints are cut, taped, reassembled, curled, and tacked to the wall to emphasize the physical nature of the work.
  • Stitched photographs derived from Warhols own photos taken from 1976-87. He shot about a roll a day.
    Prints are very tactile, like Starns, these prints buckle and have worn edges.
    Box framing emphasized their haptic quality.
    Threads were sewn on a sewing machine by Warhol’s assistants.
    Grace Jones was former performance artist, pop singer, model and actress.
    Though she is recognizable, her image becomes a pattern--wallpaper when multipled.
  • In other Warhol works the formal pattern becomes compelling when multiplied.
    We are aware of looking at a photograph with the perspectival distortions of the parallel lines.
    Warhol, too, appropriates in his photography. Many of his images seem derived from photographic history, especially from 20th C. modern photographers.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Slide concept by William V. Ganis, PhD
    FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY
    For publication, reproduction or transmission of images, please contact individual artists, estates, photographers and exhibiting institutions for permissions and rights.
  • Pomoart

    1. 1. Postmodernism William V. Ganis, PhD
    2. 2. Philip Johnson AT&T Building (Sony Building) New York, New York 1979
    3. 3. Philip Johnson AT&T Building (Sony Building) New York, New York 1979
    4. 4. Cindy Sherman Untitled #54 1980 gelatin-silver print 8 x 10 in.
    5. 5. Cindy Sherman Untitled #43 1979 gelatin-silver print 8 x 10 in.
    6. 6. Cindy Sherman Untitled #92 1981 type-C print 24 x 48 in.
    7. 7. Cindy Sherman Untitled #209 1989 type-C print 57 x 41 in.
    8. 8. Sherrie Levine Untitled (After Walker Evans) 1981 gelatin-silver print 10 x 8 in.
    9. 9. Sherrie Levine Untitled (After Alexsandr Rodchenko: 11) 1987 gelatin-silver print 20 x 16 in.
    10. 10. William Wegman Fay Ray 1988 gelatin silver print 6 x 6 in.
    11. 11. William Wegman Front Faade 1993 color Polaroid 24 x 20 in.
    12. 12. Andres Serrano Nomad (Sir Leonard) 1990 Cibachrome print edition of four 60 x 49 1/2 in.
    13. 13. Richard Prince Untitled (Three Women Looking in the Same Direction) 1980 3 Ektacolor prints 40 x 60 in. each
    14. 14. Richard Prince Bitches and Bastards 1985-86 Ektacolor print 86 x 48 in.
    15. 15. Richard Prince Bitches and Bastards 1985-86 Ektacolor print 86 x 48 in.
    16. 16. Mike and Doug Starn Blue Hands 1987 toned silver prints and tape 64 x 76 in.
    17. 17. Mike and Doug Starn Horses (detail of installation) 1985-86 toned silver prints and tape 10 x 15 ft. overall
    18. 18. Mike and Doug Starn Horses (detail of installation) 1985-86 toned silver prints and tape 10 x 15 ft. overall
    19. 19. Andy Warhol Grace Jones 1984-86 9 gelatin-silver prints and thread 40 x 33 in.
    20. 20. Andy Warhol World Trade Center ca. 1986-87 6 gelatin-silver prints and thread 31 1/2 x 27 1/4 in.
    21. 21. Andy Warhol Dollar Signs 1982 silkscreen ink and synthetic polymer paint on canvas 20 x 16 each
    22. 22. Allan McCollum Plaster Surrogates 1983 enamel on solid-cast Hydrostone
    23. 23. Jeff Koons Vacuum Cleaners: New Hoover Deluxe Shampoo Polishers 1980 polishers in Plexiglas boxes with fluorescent lights 56 x 22 x 14 in.
    24. 24. Jeff Koons New Hoover Convertables, Green, Blue; Double Decker 1981-87 Vacuum cleaners in Plexiglas boxes with fluorescent lights 9 ft. 8 in. x 3 ft. 5 in. x 2 ft. 4 in.
    25. 25. Jeff Koons Rabbit 1986 stainless steel 41 x 19 x 12 in.
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