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The future of digital work in Scotland
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The future of digital work in Scotland

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The future of digital work in Scotland The future of digital work in Scotland Document Transcript

  • “How are companies inspired to embrace new developments that sustain work?” Ewan McIntoshFuture workplace defined by- a large pubic sector learning to be smaller- large corporations struggling to innovate and connect in a faster worldbut the nature of companies is evolving fast
  • The VSSMEFuture workplace defined by - a large pubic sector learning to be smaller - large corporations struggling to innovate and connect in a faster world - a legion of micro businesses or VSSMEs (93% of Scotland’s companies are micro businesses, with fewer than 10 employees (2010 http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201012/cmselect/cmscotaf/writev/support/m03.htm))Many are local shops and services, others are local but should be aiming for global. Others are purely global, and gain no benefit from being based in Scotland at all.Like mine. We work with creative industry etc..Our Scottish turnover in the past two years doesn’t even reach half a per cent. 30 per cent comes from Australia alone. The Middle East and the US feature strongly, too. We stand to turnmore revenue over in public sector contracts with Francophone Europe and Spain, countries with poorer credit ratings than our own, than we do in Scotland.There is a dilemma - stay in Scotland because of some sense of pride, convenience for company setup... or move to a place that provides more revenue, has cheaper tax regimes but a mildinconvenience of setup.Short term pain for long term gains, a long term loss for Scotland.So where does this challenge come from? It’s the way connected, micro companies operate that is moving faster than the population and public sector at large in Scotland, and much of it isbased on the potential that digital offers
  • The VSSME The Very Small Small or Medium Size EnterpriseFuture workplace defined by - a large pubic sector learning to be smaller - large corporations struggling to innovate and connect in a faster world - a legion of micro businesses or VSSMEs (93% of Scotland’s companies are micro businesses, with fewer than 10 employees (2010 http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201012/cmselect/cmscotaf/writev/support/m03.htm))Many are local shops and services, others are local but should be aiming for global. Others are purely global, and gain no benefit from being based in Scotland at all.Like mine. We work with creative industry etc..Our Scottish turnover in the past two years doesn’t even reach half a per cent. 30 per cent comes from Australia alone. The Middle East and the US feature strongly, too. We stand to turnmore revenue over in public sector contracts with Francophone Europe and Spain, countries with poorer credit ratings than our own, than we do in Scotland.There is a dilemma - stay in Scotland because of some sense of pride, convenience for company setup... or move to a place that provides more revenue, has cheaper tax regimes but a mildinconvenience of setup.Short term pain for long term gains, a long term loss for Scotland.So where does this challenge come from? It’s the way connected, micro companies operate that is moving faster than the population and public sector at large in Scotland, and much of it isbased on the potential that digital offers
  • The VSSME Wicked problemsDefinition of wicked problems:1. The causes of the problem are not just complex but deep ambiguous; you can tell why things are happening the way theyare and what causes them to do so.
  • The VSSME Wicked problemsBill Buxton, principal researcher at Microsoft: "Designers thrive on problem setting, at least as much as problem solving."Tim Brown: "Poor design briefs are not normally the ones with too many constraints (although that can be an issue), but theones that take all opportunity for discovery and surprise away." The design thinker has a stance that seeks the unknown,embraces the possibility of surprise, and is comfortable with wading into complexity not knowing what is on there other side.Companies commissioning services
  • The VSSME Wicked problems From mystery to algorithmRay Krok
  • EWANRay Krok: machines a milkshake. Mais, il avait un client interessant
  • Ray Krok
  • Aesthetics
  • Menu furniture
  • Bread and pasta baked on premises
  • Roger Martin’s Mystery to AlgorithmDriving through the knowledge funnelRoger MartinCompanies often stay in heuristics - personal talents which keep people in highly paid jobsDoing this means more can be devolved to people who are not the originators of ideasFrees up high level thinking to develop new IP. It’s not about dumbing down their ideas, it’s aboutfreeing that up to develop new ones.
  • The VSSME Wicked problems From mystery to algorithmAnd it spreads to every area of business - seeking technologies that do accountancy,payments, invoicing like ‘pro’ companies (and often more effectively).Most managers in business crave their job title and eeping that title is ms akin to keeping
  • The VSSME Wicked problems From mystery to algorithm Jobs to projectsIn most organisations people have defined job titles,PROTECTIONThe activity of moving knowledge through the funnel runs against most peoples logic if it means that their job responsibility and titlebecomes defunct - whose goal in this room is to do themselves out of a job?And the logical activity for making knowledge move through the funnel is the project, where everyone takes a project-specific role,roles changing with each project, playing to the (ongoing learning) strengths of each person on the team.This means that they take responsibility for themselves and their work (my responsibilities) instead of for the task in hand (ourresponsibilities).RISKWhen you’re looking after ‘my responsibilities’ then you’re less prepared to take risks - the failure comes back to you. It means thateven if innovatino is outsourced, it is doomed to forever remain the pilot programme.SILO AND DISTANCE FROM INNOVATIONThe attitudinal baggage that title brings is not just silo-isation of departments - it’s blindness to innovation taking place outside, eveninnovation that has been contracted. A reduction of Govt has turned people into commissioners of action, rather than taking an interestin what’s happening. When progress is made, fast, they often find themselves ‘out of the loop’, because they’re relying on non-digitaltraditional comms to keep a grasp - meetings, reports, PRINCE2 reports - rather than joining the community of practitioners in theplace where that innovatino is happening.
  • The VSSME Wicked problems From mystery to algorithm Jobs to projects Reliability to validityReliability is what has been proven in the past to work (but whose future is just as uncertain in a time of flux). Validity is whatmight be right, even if its not been proven before.A growth mindset, where a person constantly learns and relearns in order to survive and thrive requires validity over reliability,knowing that deadends and failure can be learned from to create successes for the longer term benefit of the organisation."Companies are good at producing hothouse tomatoes", says John Maeda… "Perfectly formed and identical, edible but notdelicious. Most dont yet know how to integrate the heirloom tomato - the tomato that looks a little different from the rest,lovingly grown by hand with attention to detail, mouthwateringly delicious."The Cirque de Soleil Case Study. An organisation that is highly artistic but which manages the balance between flexibility andspecificity in its management of a $600m dollar business with 13 shows in four continents that is based on the creative riskstaken every day by its performers and show managers.
  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/eschipul/5544592972/The Cirque de Soleil Case Study. An organisation that is highly artistic but which manages the balance between flexibility andspecificity in its management of a $600m dollar business with 13 shows in four continents that is based on the creative riskstaken every day by its performers and show managers.
  • The VSSME Wicked problems From mystery to algorithm Jobs to projects Reliability to validityThis balance is a huge challenge for VSSMEs as they often work faster than the managers managing them in larger corps.How can those commissioning services or products from agile companies create space for innovation:- better briefs, specific but flexible- more literacy of the development cycles of small, agile firms e.g. design thinking, agile development, scrums- an understanding that big biz and public service might have to work in the way of the VSSME, not the other way around- who is responsible for safeguarding the design thinking ethic of the organisation, looking at things from the user’sperspective (and that includes the perspective of partner companies).
  • The Network Society is socialThe Network itself is crucialWe look out; public servants in Scotland look in (filtered access in schools and govt, the concentration on intranet techinstead of sharing thinking and process for comment)We make decisions with a view to them being altered vs making decisions, ‘consulting’ with the public and going aheadanyway.We crave opinion, not just facts and data.
  • The Network Society is social The plural of anecdote is not dataThe Network itself is crucialRoger BrinnerWe crave opinion, not fact.
  • The Network Society is social The plural of anecdote is not data Face to face, not just virtualA challenge for rural groups, but also for remote onesI live in Edinburgh but work with clients all over the world. The online community of Scotland ishard to connect with - certain mental bandwidth, certain time, certain relatinoships150 people Dunbar NumberFace to face is often required to keep a lasting relationship, but with most countries, online isenough for a first deal.In Scotland, anecdotaly everyone seems to want to meet.The use of face to face networking as free labour, rather than the place where the deal is decided.
  • The Network Society is social The plural of anecdote is not data Face to face, not just virtual Network literacy is never just caughtMost people in Scottish business feel LinkedIn is useless. We know this because SE’sLinkedIn groups contain few members, and even less actionMost Scottish business see comms as something that gets outsourced - their outsourcingtheir network, and outsourcing their potential sales route.96% of our business comes frmo social media. With the keen online relationships we have,around 87% of customers repeat.
  • ewan@notosh.com @ewanmcintosh notosh.comWe learn actively about how to harness our networks - we do it ourselves, we read, wemeet up with colleagues to share techniques and stories.A digital workplace in Scotland needs to see the network as its backboneWe connect. WE have the conversations directly with the people who can influence ourthinking.We never outsource it.