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Tracking Faces Using Pca
 

Tracking Faces Using Pca

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    Tracking Faces Using Pca Tracking Faces Using Pca Presentation Transcript

    • Tracking faces using PCA Stephen Amar & Xuyan Yan
    • Do we use markers ? • NO ! • The whole point is to have something that do not require any physical markers.
    • How is this working ? • OpenCV implementation of Principal Components Analysis • 2 steps: – Training – Real-time tracking (webcam, movie …)
    • Training • We have a training set: – A bunch of pictures and a list of coordinates
    • Training • We apply PCA on this train set. – The coordinates are written in the last line of the picture. – Each picture is transformed into a giant vector (128x128 pix => 16384 dimensions vector). – The Average Image and the Covariance Matrix of these pictures-vectors is computed . – We find the eigenvectors and the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix (OpenCV uses the Jacobi eigenvalue algorithm but we could also use SVD).
    • Real-time tracking • Once we have some training data: – Get a new image to track – Decompose this new image using the eigenvectors. From this operation, we get [α1,…, αn] where n is the number of train pictures - 1. – Now, we are going to compute: Output  Avg   1 I 1  ...   1 I n – Using the output, we just need to read the last line to get our new coordinates.
    • Downsides • A train set can work for only one face. • Very sensitive to the lighting conditions. • Very sensitive to the background. • The “actor” must remain still. • The OpenCV implementation is quite limited (support only 8 bits grayscale pictures).
    • Possible Improvements • Instead of using the OpenCV implementation, do it ourselves. – OpenCV offers all the basic functions (Computation of the Covariance Matrix, SVD and other Matrix multiplication algorithms) – We could do this using 32 bits float pictures.