K 12 lesson plan modification tutorial s13

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K 12 lesson plan modification tutorial s13

  1. 1. B Y E L I Z A B E T H V I S E D OK-12 Lesson Plan ModificationTutorial
  2. 2. R E T U R N T O S T E P SR E T U R N T O W H E R E Y O U C A M E F R O MG O T O P R E V I O U S S L I D EG O T O N E X T S L I D EE X I T T H E P R E S E N T A T I O NNavigating the TutorialB A C K T OS T E P SE X I T
  3. 3. StepsStep1Select &Evaluate aLesson PlanStep2Modify theLesson PlanStep3Modify theFollow-Up/AssessmentStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklists
  4. 4. Selecting a Lesson PlanStep1Select &Evaluatea LessonPlanFor criteria guidelines: Basic HintsHow to recognize a good LP when you see it: Do you have a question about the basiccontent of a good LP? If no, go on. If yes, go to Write a Lesson Plan Guide How to find a good LP online: Do you have a good LP picked out? Ifyes, go on. If no, go to Finding Lesson Plans On LineHow to prepare your LP for modification: Are there any sections missing in your LP? Lesson Plan Checklist: Objectives Lesson Plan Checklist: All OtherElements If no, go on to Step 2. If yes, insert the missing sections for the LPyou are working on.B A C K T OS T E P S E X I T
  5. 5. Basic Hints for Selecting a Lesson PlanStep1Select &Evaluatea LessonPlan The lesson plan you select must beoriginally intended for native speakersof English. That is, not a lesson intended forESOL students, and therefore alreadymodified. The lesson plan should be for acontent subject class. Not a lesson plan that teaches Englishto Speakers of Other Languages. The lesson plan must be for a level ofstudent you are interested in workingwith. If you intend to teach Elementary Ed.,this lesson should be geared toelementary studentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  6. 6. Finding Lesson Plans OnlineStep1Select &Evaluatea LessonPlanYou can conduct your own search by going toany educational search engine, e.g.: Yahoo Search  Dogpile Search  Google Search Or use some of these:Resources for Lesson Plan Ideas A to Z Teacher Stuff  PBS Teacher Source A large collection of lesson plans, teacherguides, and online student activitiescorrelated to 90 sets of state and nationalcurriculum standards. Discovery Channel Education  Education World® Lesson Plans  Education World® - National Standards This guide was originally written by Manal El-Tigi, Ph.D., Department ofInstructional Design, Development, and Evaluation - SyracuseUniversity. She was one of the principal editors and reviewers of theAskERIC Lesson Plan Collection from 1996 – 2000. Updated by EV.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  7. 7. Lesson Plan Checklist: ObjectivesStep1Select &Evaluatea LessonPlanContent ObjectivesClearly defined? Yes No Needs Work CommentsLinguistic Objectives (if any)Clearly defined? Yes No Needs Work CommentsMainstream students? Yes No Potential CommentsESOL students? Yes No Potential CommentsCultural Objectives (if any)Clearly defined? Yes No Needs Work CommentsMainstream students? Yes No Potential CommentsESOL students? Yes No Potential CommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  8. 8. Lesson Plan Checklist: All Other ElementsStep1Select &Evaluatea LessonPlanStandardsSunshine State Standards? Yes No Insufficient CommentsActivitiesClearly defined? Yes No Needs Work CommentsMainstream students? Yes No Needs Work CommentsESOL students? Yes No Needs Work CommentsMaterials? Yes No Some Missing CommentsFollow-Up/AssessmentClearly defined? Yes No Needs Work CommentsESOL students? Yes No Needs Work CommentsHome-Fun Activity Yes No Needs Work CommentsRubrics/Checklists Yes No Some Missing CommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  9. 9. Modifying the Lesson PlanStep2ModifytheLessonPlan For criteria guidelines, click on ESOLModifications Include the following information about theLesson Plan: Grade: What grade/s is this lesson for? Lesson Topic: What is the subject of thelesson? What will be taught? Materials: What materials are needed in order toteach the lesson? Additional Materials: Since your ELLs may beunable to perform the same type and/or level of tasksas the other members of the class, you will need toindicate what additional materials you will need toenhance your instruction for them.Then, follow the 3 steps below1. Modify the objectives2. Identify the Florida Sunshine StateStandards3. Describe procedures in detail, includingESOL modificationsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  10. 10. ESOL ModificationsStep2ModifytheLessonPlanBasic Guidelines Choose strategies that are appropriate foreach of the four ELL Stages ofdevelopment. See Some Examples Choose strategies that are appropriate forthe subject matter being taught: Overall Strategies Language Arts Science Social Studies Math Computer Literacy Ask your instructor for a sample of amodified lesson plan to which s/he wouldgive top grades.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  11. 11. ELL StagesStage Student Behaviors Teacher BehaviorsPre-Production• Points to or provides other non-verbal response• Actively listens• Responds to commands• Gestures• Language focuses on conveyingmeanings and vocabularydevelopment• RepetitionEarlyProduction• One-word responses• Short utterances• Asks questions that can be answeredby yes/no and either/or responses• Models correct responsesSpeechEmergence• Participates in small group activities• Demonstrates comprehension in avariety of ways• Focuses content on key concepts• Provides frequent comprehensionchecks• Uses performance-based assessment• Uses expanded vocabulary• Asks open-ended questions thatstimulate language productionIntermediateFluency• Participates in reading and writingactivities to acquire new information• Fosters conceptual development andexpanded literacy through contentStep2ModifytheLessonPlanE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  12. 12. Examples of ELL Stages and StrategiesStage Questioning TechniquesPre-Production• Point to…• Find the…• Put the _____ next to the _____.• Do you have the _____ ?• Is this a/an _______?• Who wants the ______?• Who has the ______?EarlyProduction• Yes/No questions (Is the “trouble”light on?)• Either/Or questions (Is this ascrewdriver or a hammer?)• One-word response (What utensilam I holding in my hand?)• General questions that encouragelists of words (What do you see onthe tool board?)• Two-word responses (Where did hego?“To work.”)SpeechEmergence• Why?• How?• How is this like that?• Tell me about…• Talk about …• Describe…• How would you change this part?IntermediateFluency• What would yourecommend/suggest?• How do you think the story willend?• What is the story mainly about?• What is your opinion (on thismatter)?• Describe/compare …• How are these similar or different?• What would happen if…?• Which do you prefer? Why?• Create…Step2ModifytheLessonPlanE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  13. 13. Modifying the ObjectivesStep2ModifytheLessonPlan Content Objective /sThese objectives can be behavioral or cognitive.First, your content objective should be appropriate for ALLstudents in your class. All students should cognitively be ableto learn the material you are teaching regardless of theirlanguage limitations. Linguistic Objective/s and VocabularyWhat language function or grammatical structure can betaught/ reviewed with this lesson? or What words may be aproblem for the ESOL student?Next, you will look for opportunities to add linguisticobjectives to your lesson. What language skills do you hopestudents at each of the 4 stages of proficiency can meet? Youneed to set the language objectives one level above for yourEnglish Language Learners: for example, for the Pre-production level students, you will write the objectives at theEarly production level, as you want them to move to the nextlevel, and so on… You may find ideas for language and contentobjectives for your lesson by following this link. Cultural Objective/s: These objectives are the culturally-related goals achievable in the lesson. This is an opportunityto make a link between all students’ home culture and theschool. These are teachable moments when school culture istaught, or connections are made to all students’ homecultures.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  14. 14. Identify the Florida Sunshine State StandardsStep2ModifytheLessonPlan Make sure you include the SunshineState Standards appropriate for yourlesson plan. Florida Sunshine StateStandards: What Sunshine StateStandards are being met by thislesson plan?E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  15. 15. Describe Procedures in Detail Including ESOL ModificationsStep2ModifytheLessonPlan 1. Introduction: What do you doto motivate and immediately involvethe students? 2. Presentation: What are theactivities and sequence of events forthe lesson? Are you unsure of how to dothis? If yes: see HINTS If no, proceed to Step 3.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  16. 16. Overall StrategiesStep2ModifytheLessonPlan1. Provide a climate of warmth and caring which nurtures a sense of comfort2. Seat the student close to the front of the room.3. Establish a daily routine in your classroom and prepare the student for anychanges.4. Use as many of the senses (seeing, hearing, touching, smelling and tasting) aspossible to prevent information to students.5. Provide ESOL students guidelines for written work and home-workassignments.6. Provide alternative instruction whenever the class lessons are extremelydifficult for the ELL.7. Arrange small discussion and talking activities that permit students topractice verbal skills.8. Give verbal information and explanations along with a visual presentation.9. Allow the students ample time to complete assignments.10. Keep directions short and simple.11. Assign buddies and peer tutors to your ELL.12. Clearly explain homework assignments since the ELLs lack the Englishlanguage support at home.13. Allow ELLs to use bilingual dictionaries.14. Utilize learning centers as alternative instruction to provide sufficientreinforcement of content material.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  17. 17. Language ArtsStep2ModifytheLessonPlan1. Utilize oral techniques, such as cueing, modeling elicitation and chunking.2. Utilize the Total Physical Responsive (TPR) teaching strategy which introduces a newlanguage through a series of commands to enact an event.3. Utilize the dialogue journal technique in which the students regularly communicateswith the teacher.4. Speak clearly and simplify the vocabulary; it is not necessary to speak too loudly.5. Utilize the Language Experience Approach which incorporates the experiences, theoral language, and interests of the student to develop writing and reading skills.6. Limit correcting errors of pronunciation, structure, or vocabulary. State the responsecorrectly without comment if necessary.7. Share big books in the classroom, especially those published by the students.8. Provide frequent review and repetition in each step of language and content learning.9. Choose reading and writing activities that activate the prior knowledge of thestudents.10. Use pop songs and favorite read-aloud poems.11. Present new reading vocabulary extensively, utilize props and facilitate multi-sensoryformats.12. Integrate your English curriculum with other subject areas to expand Englishvocabulary.13. Role play stories form literary based reader; if ELL has adequate language, makehim/her an active participant.14. Choose literature representative of the ethnic background in your classroom.15. Provide individual and group activities to develop listening and speaking skillsthrough learning centersE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  18. 18. ScienceStep2ModifytheLessonPlan1. Involve students in “hands-on” learning experiences to allow the ELLs to bemore active participants.2. Present new information to students in small sequential steps, allowing thestudent to concentrate on one thing at a time.3. Utilize outlines and charts during class presentation.4. Model instructions for experiments to introduce and explain newvocabulary.5. Explain clearly all safety procedures.6. Write instructions on the board so that ELL can refer to them when needed.7. Utilize the cooperative learning approach in which the ELL is given theopportunity for peer instruction.8. Assign low level language proficiency activities in which the ELL couldexperience success.9. Integrate vocabulary expansion activities, such as labeling, identifying andclassifying information.10. Allow students to answer fewer questions or written problems as long as theyacquire the key concept of the lesson.11. Provide for oral testing of new material if the ELL is not able to be tested bya written format.12. Research and present to the class interesting scientific informationconcerning the targeted ethnic groupE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  19. 19. Social StudiesStep2ModifytheLessonPlan1. Employ games and simulations to engage the students in problem-solvingand decision making.2. Assign independent projects in which the ELL will be given an opportunityto display his/her academic strength.3. Guide your students through the process of textbook reading by askingquestions, providing purpose statements and conducting discussions.4. Utilize graphic organizers such as webbing and semantic maps.5. Modify your lesson objectives according to the language level of the ELL.6. Plan for culturally oriented activities in which the ELLs can contribute theirknowledge of their culture and to promote cultural understanding in theclassroom.7. Utilize audiovisual materials which support a multi-sensory approach.8. Teach the book format to the ELLs to make sure they know how to use eachpart of the book.9. Encourage your ELLs to bring newspaper, magazines, and artifacts fromtheir home culture to show their peers.10. Assign cultural awareness projects to familiarize your students with thedifferences and similarities of the targeted culturesE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  20. 20. MathStep2ModifytheLessonPlan1. Encourage students to verbalize the steps involved in solving a problem asthey work through it on paper.2. Use manipulatives to help students visualize the math concepts .3. Allow students to use computational aids such as numberlines, abacus, counters and computation charts.4. Teach math concepts and computation procedures through games andkinesthetic activities.5. Give practice in reading word problems by identifying the key words todetermine the operation needed to solve the problem.6. Utilize whenever possible good audiovisual programs for presentation ofnew concepts and assignments.7. Conduct extensive comprehension checks whether done by the teacher orpeer tutor.8. Begin with the easiest word problem adding the harder problems in aprogressive order.9. Group problems initially by the operational procedure to be used.10. Research whenever possible the methods of main computation andapplication of the particular language groups in your class.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  21. 21. Computer LiteracyStep2ModifytheLessonPlan1. Teach through modeling rather than giving directions.2. Assign work in groups with native speakers of English.3. Have student surpass his own previous record rather than the score achievedby a rival.4. Select software that has been proved effective for the purpose of usingcontent to enhance language development.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  22. 22. HINTSStep2ModifytheLessonPlan1. Avoid making your modifications too general. (e.g. "I would speak 90% of the time to an ELL at the Pre-production level, and use lots of pictures.) Instead, define what you would say and specify what picturesyou would provide.2. Avoid making plans that would be impossible to stick to. (e.g. I would translate everything that I amdoing and label all classroom objects in the students native language, and I would allow the student towork with another student that is bilingual in his/her language and in English). Instead, define exactlywhat you would provide translations for, and do not count on having another student help you.3. Avoid making plans you cannot accomplish without cloning technology (you are only one person ; -) e.g."I will read a book to the class, and AT THE SAME TIME, I will help the preproduction students onmatching words to pictures, and AT THE SAME TIME, I will help the early production kids with newvocabulary and spelling....4. Be careful with assumptions that methods aimed at special education and early childhood children willwork equally well with ELLs at all levels of proficiency and that no real modifications need to be made.5. Be careful with assumptions about students at the Intermediate Fluency Stage. They may communicatevery well orally, but may not be as able when it comes to written tasks, particularly CALP activities.6. Your goal is to keep your ESOL students working to the full extent of their abilities in English on the sametask as the rest of the class so that they can participate to the maximum amount possible. This keeps thestudents from falling behind academically in content areas, and reinforces vocabulary and structure byhaving them use English in meaningful ways and through social interaction. It also helps avoid academicand social isolation from the other students, thus promoting even greater English language proficiency.7. The goal is NOT to write 5 lesson plans (one for native speakers and one for each of the stages ofproficiency). It is to explain how you would modify what you are already doing to make it more salient toyour ELLs. Much of the time, this will mean adding some more communicative features, such as realiaand pantomime, to your instruction to the entire class, yet at other times it may mean that you wish tooffer the ELLs a separate task that they can complete at their linguistic level, that is related to the lesson athand, while the other children tackle something somewhat different and more linguistically complex.Prepared by Michelle MacyE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  23. 23. Modifying the Follow-Up/AssessmentStep3Modify theFollow-Up/Assessment Since your ELLs may not be able to performthe same type and/or level of tasks as theother members of the class, you will need toindicate how you will Assess/Evaluate theirunderstanding/comprehension of thesubject matter, as well as the English andcultural tasks that you have set beforethem. Students at each of the 4 stages ofproficiency often do well with alternativetypes of assessment. Follow-up: What HomeFUN assignmentwould be appropriate to reinforce theobjectives of this lesson? Assessment: What will you do to becertain that your ESOL studentunderstands the lesson and has masteredthe objectives? Remember: All Activities andAssessment should be relevant tothe Objectives.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  24. 24. HomeFUN ActivitiesStep3Modify theFollow-Up/AssessmentCharacteristics are engaging andfun. integrate language. necessitate bothparent and childinvolvement. respect and utilizethe home language. allow adequate timefor families tocomplete. are introducedcarefully and areused in class whenthey are completed. provide variationsbased on students’language levels. are frequentlyplanned with otherteachers fordevelopment andexchange of ideas.Excerpted from:Enright, D. S., & McCloskey, M. L. (1988).Integrating English: Developing Englishlanguage and literacy in the multilingual classroom.Reading MA.: Addison-WesleyPublishing Company, pp. 260-263.Reprinted with permission.Sample HomeFUN ActivitiesSome assignments for students and their family members: Make a personal timeline of the student’s life. Make a map of family or ancestral migrations. Make a family tree. Study how family members use reading or writing; listthe many ways in which a family member uses print inone day. Sketch bedrooms, houses, and blocks. Make maps of routes commonly traveled, forexample, to school. Get a library card and learn how to use it. Write down an unwritten family recipe as familymember prepares the dish. Collect family stories in a certain category--humor, superstitions, ghost stories. Collect funny stories about the student’s childhood. Study a particular aspect of parents’ childhood:work, housing, television, radio, segregation. Make lists and sketches of wildlife near the home in acertain category, for example, insects, mammals, birds. Collaborate on a cooking activity.E X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  25. 25. ESOL-Modification Checklists• Sunshine State Standards have been composed for mainstream students.At the moment, no State Standards have been officially listed forELLs, though the TESOL Standards are recommended.• The lesson plan must have objectives, or goals. There will, of course, begoals for ALL students to meet. The teacher may, however, wish to adjustthose goals to the abilities of the ELLs in the class. The teacher may alsodecide to create some additional and specialized objectives just for theELLs.• Content Objectives Checklist• Linguistic Objectives Checklist• Cultural Objectives ChecklistStandardsandObjectives• Activities Checklist• Materials ChecklistActivitiesandMaterials• HomeFun Activities Checklist• Assessment ChecklistFollow-Up/AssessmentStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklistsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  26. 26. ESOL-Modified Content Objectives ChecklistStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklistsContent ObjectivesThese objectives are the subject-area goals intended for the lesson.Are the objectives clearly defined? (Goals arespecific and clear)Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan the objectives be attained by ELLs at the Pre-Production level? If not, are modified objectivesincluded?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan the objectives be attained by ELLs at the EarlyProduction level? If not, are modified objectivesincluded?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan the objectives be attained by ELLs at theSpeech Emergence level? If not, are modifiedobjectives included?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan the objectives be attained by ELLs at theIntermediate Fluency level?If not, are modifiedobjectives included?Yes No Needs Work CommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  27. 27. ESOL-Modified Linguistic Objectives ChecklistStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklistsLinguistic ObjectivesThese objectives are the language-related goals achievable in the lesson. These may be aimed at themainstream, but there are likely to be more language-teaching opportunities for ELLs.Are the objectives clearly defined? (Goals arespecific and clear)Yes No Needs Work CommentsAre there any language-related objectives forMainstream students?Yes No Potential CommentsAre there any language-related objectives for Pre-Production students?Yes No Potential CommentsAre there any language-related objectives for EarlyProduction students?Yes No Potential CommentsAre there any language-related objectives forSpeech Emergence students?Yes No Potential CommentsAre there any language-related objectives forIntermediate Fluency students?Yes No Potential CommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  28. 28. ESOL-Modified Cultural Objectives ChecklistStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklistsCultural ObjectivesThese objectives are the culturally-related goals achievable in the lesson. These may be aimed at themainstream, but there are likely to be more culture-teaching opportunities for ELLs.Are the objectives clearly defined? (Goals arespecific and clear)Yes No Needs Work CommentsAre there any culturally-related objectives forMainstream students?Yes No Potential CommentsAre there any culturally-related objectives for Pre-Production students?Yes No Potential CommentsAre there any culturally-related objectives forEarly Production students?Yes No Potential CommentsAre there any culturally-related objectives forSpeech Emergence students?Yes No Potential CommentsAre there any culturally-related objectives forIntermediate Fluency students?Yes No Potential CommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  29. 29. ESOL-Modified Activities ChecklistStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklistsActivitiesOften the lesson is broken up into a pre-activity (introduction, advanced organizer, review), activity(procedure, method) and a post-activity (closure, conclusion, follow-up). The pre-activity is the occasionfor the teacher to review information, establish schema, and create a scaffold for learning. The activity isthe central part of the lesson. The post-activity is the opportunity for the teacher to debrief students onwhat has just been done or to continue the lesson along a logical course.Are the activities clearly defined? (Steps arespecific and clear)Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan ELLs at the Pre-Production levelaccomplish/participate in the activities? If not, aremodifications or alternative activities included?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan ELLs at the Early Production levelaccomplish/participate in the activities? If not, aremodifications or alternative activities included?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan ELLs at the Speech Emergence levelaccomplish/participate in the activities? If not, aremodifications or alternative activities included?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan ELLs at the Intermediate Fluency levelaccomplish/participate in the activities? If not, aremodifications or alternative activities included?Yes No Needs Work CommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  30. 30. ESOL-Modified Materials ChecklistStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklistsMaterialsAs in any lesson plan, a list of necessary materials must be included. Some additional materials mayneed to be brought in to enhance comprehension of the content, to improve skills in English or to dealwith culturally-oriented material for ELLs.Have all the materials needed for this lesson beenlisted?Yes No SomeMissingCommentsAre there any special materials required and listedfor Pre-Production students?Yes No SomeMissingCommentsAre there any special materials required and listedfor Early Production students?Yes No SomeMissingCommentsAre there any special materials required and listedfor Speech Emergence students?Yes No SomeMissingCommentsAre there any special materials required and listedfor Intermediate Fluency students?Yes No SomeMissingCommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  31. 31. ESOL-Modified HomeFUN Activities ChecklistStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklistsHomeFUN ActivitiesAre the activities engaging and fun? Yes No Needs Work CommentsDo the activities integrate language for thedifferent ELL levels?Yes No Needs Work CommentsDo the activities include both child and parentinvolvement?Yes No Needs Work CommentsDo the activities show respect for and utilize thehome language?Yes No Needs Work CommentsDo the assignments allow adequate time forfamilies to complete?Yes No Needs Work CommentsDoes the plan include how the activities will beintroduced in class so that ELL of all levelsunderstand what is expected of them?Yes No Needs Work CommentsAre the activities debriefed in class aftercompletion?Yes No Needs Work CommentsAre variations provided based on the students’language levels?Yes No Needs Work CommentsDo the activities provide integration of contents? Yes No Needs Work CommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  32. 32. ESOL-Modified Assessment ChecklistStep4ESOL-ModificationChecklistsAssessmentJust because you teach it doesn’t mean they learn it. This part of the lesson outlines whatinstruments/observations are necessary to assess whether or not the objectives set for the lesson haveactually been met. The assessments may need to be modified to the abilities of the ELLs in the class. Theteacher may also decide to create some additional and specialized assessments just for the ELLs.Are the assessments clearly defined? (Steps arespecific and clear)Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan ELLs at the Pre-Production levelaccomplish/complete the assessments? If not, aremodifications or alternative assessmentsincluded?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan ELLs at the Early Production levelaccomplish/complete the assessments? If not, aremodifications or alternative assessmentsincluded?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan ELLs at the Speech Emergence levelaccomplish/complete the assessments? If not, aremodifications or alternative assessmentsincluded?Yes No Needs Work CommentsCan ELLs at the Intermediate Fluency levelaccomplish/complete the assessments? If not, aremodifications or alternative assessmentsincluded?Yes No Needs Work CommentsE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S
  33. 33. P L E A S E C O N S U L T Y O U R I N S T R U C T O RF O R M O R E D E T A I L SThis ends our tutorialE X I TB A C K T OS T E P S

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