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Prison Gangs in the 21st Century



                      By
    Ridha Ben Hammouda

         Everest University-South Cam...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                               2
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                               3
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                               4
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                                   5
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
HISTORY
 Prison gangs began to form in federal and state prison
  correctional instituti...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century

 Today, correctional institutions no
 longer use the term gangs in order to
 deny any u...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
  Security Threat Groups/Prison Gangs -
a group of individuals possessing common
charact...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                               9
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                               10
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century

TYPES OF SECURITY THREAT GROUPS

Traditional Prison Gangs:
  well organized groups of i...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
Traditional Prison Gangs

In the 21st century, there are six (6) major traditional
secur...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
I. Aryan Brotherhood – (Other names: AB, Alice,
    Alice Baker, Tip, Brand; earlier name...
Aryan Brotherhood




                    14
Aryan Brotherhood
 They are very well organized.

 Key decisions and murders must be approved
  by a “Commission” prior ...
Aryan Brotherhood

 Members will state that their goal is
 “getting high and getting over” or making
 their time in priso...
Aryan Brotherhood




                    17
Aryan Brotherhood

Tattoos are common. The true “brand” of the
Aryan Brotherhood is a shamrock tattoo with
the letters AB...
Aryan Brotherhood


Many are professionals (e.g. attorneys)

AB may hold gang meetings disguised as
“testifying in a cou...
Aryan Brotherhood




                    20
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                               21
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
II. Black Guerilla Family – (Also known as “BGF”; original
             know as “The Blac...
Black Guerilla Family




                        23
Black Guerilla Family




                        24
Black Guerilla Family

 The gang had links to the Black Mafia,
   Black Liberation Army, Weatherman
   Underground, the S...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
III. La Neustra Familia (“Our Family”) –
    Other names include “LNF”, “NF”, “ENE”, “F”,...
La Neustra Familia




                     27
La Neustra Familia

 Allies include the Black Guerilla Family.

 Texas Syndicate, Mexican Mafia, F-14,
   Mexikanemi and...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
IV. Mexican Mafia            - (Also known as “La Eme”,
    Emily and Emeros)

   The Me...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                               30
Mexican Mafia

 The Mexican Mafia is an ally of the Aryan
 Brotherhood. They work together to
 control prostitution, drug...
Mexican Mafia




                32
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                                   33
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century

V. Neta – (Also known as Asociacion Neta)
   Neta was formed in the late 1970’s in Oso ...
Neta
 The 30th of each month is celebrated as a
  tribute to fallen Neta members. Members display
  the Puerto Rican flag...
Neta




       36
Neta
 Neta members keep a low profile and they
 are more difficult to identify than other
 gangs.

 They are involved in...
Neta




       38
Neta
 Neta allies itself with Los Macheteros.

 Neta’s enemies include Los Solidos , Latin
 Kings and 20 Luv.




      ...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
VI. Texas Syndicate – Other names used include
    Syndicato Tejano, “TS”, “ESE”, “TE”, a...
Texas Syndicate




                  41
Texas Syndicate
The leader is called the “Chairman”.

Gang members, known as “carnal”, tattoo themselves with their
“TS”...
Texas Syndicate




                  43
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century

Non-Traditional Prison Gangs are not as well known
   as traditional security threat gro...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
   Understanding the Language of Prison
                  Gangs
The specialized vocabula...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
     GLOSSARY OF WORDS FOR PRISON
                GANGS
Blood in - the policy of most gan...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century


 Buster –fraudulent gang member
 Catch cold – to get killed
 Click up – getting alon...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century

Jug-up – meal time

Killing your number – serving one’s time or getting
out on parole

K...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century

Lugger – an inmate who smuggles and
possesses contraband and illicit substances
Red eye ...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
 Vocabulary in combination with
     Hand signs and Gestures
     Symbols
     Colors...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century
                     SUMMARY
 Prison gangs of the 21st century have evolved into
  highl...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century




                                   52

                           References 11: The Prison
    Clear, T. R., Cole, G. F., & Reisig, M. D. (2008). Chapter
    ...
 Walker, R. (n.d.). Other Prison Gangs--The History and Background
    of the Non-Traditional Prison Gangs. Retrieved Mar...
Prison Gangs in the 21st Century



                      By
    Ridha Ben Hammouda

         Everest University-South Cam...
THE END




          56
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A brief overview of the creation and growth of prison gangs in the United States.

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  1. 1. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century By Ridha Ben Hammouda Everest University-South Campus 1
  2. 2. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 2
  3. 3. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 3
  4. 4. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 4
  5. 5. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 5
  6. 6. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century HISTORY  Prison gangs began to form in federal and state prison correctional institutions in the 1960’s and 70’s. They began as a way for prisoners to protect themselves from rival gangs inside the prison walls and from hardened criminals who took advantage of new inmates.  In the early 1990’s, prison disturbances increased 400 percent  Nationally, and internationally, prison gangs pose a threat because of their role in the transportation and distribution of narcotics.  They are an important link between street gangs and drug trafficking organizations. 6
  7. 7. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century  Today, correctional institutions no longer use the term gangs in order to deny any undue acknowledgement of criminal activities inside the prisons. Instead, the more modern term used is security threat group or STG . 7
  8. 8. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century Security Threat Groups/Prison Gangs - a group of individuals possessing common characteristics that distinguish them from other groups and are a threat to staff, other inmates, the institution, or the community; a select group of inmates, usually structured along ethnic or racial lines, who have an organized hierarchy and are governed by an established code of conduct.
  9. 9. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 9
  10. 10. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 10
  11. 11. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century TYPES OF SECURITY THREAT GROUPS Traditional Prison Gangs: well organized groups of inmates. Non-Traditional Prison Gang: less well organized group of inmates.
  12. 12. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century Traditional Prison Gangs In the 21st century, there are six (6) major traditional security threat groups. These groups originated in the 1960’s and 70’s as a means of protection from other groups and inmate predators. They are known for their violence.
  13. 13. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century I. Aryan Brotherhood – (Other names: AB, Alice, Alice Baker, Tip, Brand; earlier names from the 1950’s included Blue Birds, Diamond Tooth Gang, Nazi Gang.)  The Aryan Brotherhood began in 1967 in San Quintin Prison, a facility in the California Department of Corrections, to protect Caucasian prisoners from Hispanic and African- American prisoners.  They display neo-Nazi characteristics and believe in white supremacy of those with German and Irish ancestry.  While AB holds a deep hatred toward blacks, they associate with and support black gangs to encourage prison disturbances, when they need them for drug transactions, and extortion.
  14. 14. Aryan Brotherhood 14
  15. 15. Aryan Brotherhood  They are very well organized.  Key decisions and murders must be approved by a “Commission” prior to implementation.  They are the most violent and most feared! 15
  16. 16. Aryan Brotherhood  Members will state that their goal is “getting high and getting over” or making their time in prison as comfortable as possible.  They have been known to strangle victims with their bare hands and to gouge out a person’s eyes at the smallest sign of disrespect. 16
  17. 17. Aryan Brotherhood 17
  18. 18. Aryan Brotherhood Tattoos are common. The true “brand” of the Aryan Brotherhood is a shamrock tattoo with the letters AB and three sixes (e.g. 666). Consent is needed to wear the brand. People wearing the brand without consent of the gang are often murdered.
  19. 19. Aryan Brotherhood Many are professionals (e.g. attorneys) AB may hold gang meetings disguised as “testifying in a court case”.
  20. 20. Aryan Brotherhood 20
  21. 21. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 21
  22. 22. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century II. Black Guerilla Family – (Also known as “BGF”; original know as “The Black Family”, also known at the Black Vanguard)  Traditional prison gang that is very anti-government.  The Black Guerilla Family started in 1967 by Black Panther Party member George Jackson in California.  Formed as a Marxist/Maoist/Leninist politically revolutionary organization.  Goals include:  Overthrow of the U.S. government  Elimination of racism  Maintaining dignity in prison.  The Black Guerilla Family has a military structure with a “Supreme Leader”, a central committee and military ranks.
  23. 23. Black Guerilla Family 23
  24. 24. Black Guerilla Family 24
  25. 25. Black Guerilla Family  The gang had links to the Black Mafia, Black Liberation Army, Weatherman Underground, the Symbionese Liberation Army and other black gangs.  Their enemies include The Aryan Brotherhood, Texas Syndicate and Mexican Mafia.
  26. 26. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century III. La Neustra Familia (“Our Family”) – Other names include “LNF”, “NF”, “ENE”, “F”, “Nancy Flores”.  La Neustra Familia originated at Soledad Prison in California in the mid-1960’s to protect rural Mexican immigrants from urban immigrants;  LNF has a constitution and it has a paramilitary organizational structure.  There are ranks from soldier to general.
  27. 27. La Neustra Familia 27
  28. 28. La Neustra Familia  Allies include the Black Guerilla Family.  Texas Syndicate, Mexican Mafia, F-14, Mexikanemi and Aryan Brotherhood are among their enemies. 28
  29. 29. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century IV. Mexican Mafia - (Also known as “La Eme”, Emily and Emeros)  The Mexican Mafia originated as a street gang in the late 1950’s in the California Department of Corrections.  Their ideology is based on violence to create fear and command respect, ethnic solidarity and control of drug trafficking.  There is a paramilitary organizational structure in which generals give discipline and instructions to be carried out by captains, lieutenants, and soldiers. 29
  30. 30. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 30
  31. 31. Mexican Mafia  The Mexican Mafia is an ally of the Aryan Brotherhood. They work together to control prostitution, drugs, weapons and murder. Other allies include Mexikanemi, the New Mexico Syndicate and urban Latino street gangs.  Enemies include La Nuestra Familia, Black Guerilla Family and black street gangs. 31
  32. 32. Mexican Mafia 32
  33. 33. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 33
  34. 34. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century V. Neta – (Also known as Asociacion Neta)  Neta was formed in the late 1970’s in Oso Blanco Prison in Rio Pedras, Puerto Rico to stop the violence between rival groups in the prison and to protect weaker prisoners from a group known as the G’27.  Members are Hispanic of Puerto Rican-American ancestry.  Aspiring members must recruit 20 new prospects to qualify for full membership. 34
  35. 35. Neta  The 30th of each month is celebrated as a tribute to fallen Neta members. Members display the Puerto Rican flag and carry identification cards.  The organization takes on the structure of a social or cultural club with a president, vice – president, recruiter, secretary, sergeant–at-arms and enforcer.  They are very secretive and will not freely admit membership. 35
  36. 36. Neta 36
  37. 37. Neta  Neta members keep a low profile and they are more difficult to identify than other gangs.  They are involved in drug trade, extortion and perform hits for other gangs.  Their weapons of choice are automatic and semiautomatic weapons. 37
  38. 38. Neta 38
  39. 39. Neta  Neta allies itself with Los Macheteros.  Neta’s enemies include Los Solidos , Latin Kings and 20 Luv. 39
  40. 40. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century VI. Texas Syndicate – Other names used include Syndicato Tejano, “TS”, “ESE”, “TE”, and “Teresa Sanchez”.  The Texas Syndicate began in California at Folsom State Prison in the early 1970’s in response to other traditional prison gangs.  While members are mostly Mexican-American inmates, non-Hispanics are allowed to become members.  There are written rules for members to follow. 40
  41. 41. Texas Syndicate 41
  42. 42. Texas Syndicate The leader is called the “Chairman”. Gang members, known as “carnal”, tattoo themselves with their “TS” logo design that may be cleverly disguised. The Texas Syndicate allies itself with the Texas Mafia and Dirty White Boys. Enemies include the Aryan Brotherhood, La Nuestra Familia, Mexican Mafia, Mexikanemi and Mandingo Warriors. The largest predatory groups of inmates in Florida are the Aryan Brotherhood and Neta.
  43. 43. Texas Syndicate 43
  44. 44. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century Non-Traditional Prison Gangs are not as well known as traditional security threat groups, but they are equally dangerous. They hold similar cultural and criminal beliefs. They are active in state prison systems and the Federal Bureau of Prisons.  Some of the non-traditional gangs include the following:  New Mexico Syndicate  MexikanemiNazi Low Riders  Arizona Aryan Brotherhood  Azteca  Dirty White Boys  Los Solidos  Texas Mafia  415’sTri-City Bombers  Trinitarios Identifiers  Bulldog Nation  Border Brothers  Aryan Circle  Mandingo Warriors 44
  45. 45. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century Understanding the Language of Prison Gangs The specialized vocabulary of prison gangs serves to maintain their secrecy, identity and solidarity. For correctional officers, breaking the language codes of prison gangs has allowed them to Interrupt violent actions  Stop illicit business transactions  Save lives.
  46. 46. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century GLOSSARY OF WORDS FOR PRISON GANGS Blood in - the policy of most gangs that requires new members to “spill someone else’s blood”, or commit a murder or aggravated assault, to join. Targets may be another gang’s member, a police or officer, or an innocent person selected at random. This is a means of protection against infiltration because police officers will refuse these membership rituals. Blood out – trying to get out of a prison gang usually results in death. Like street gangs, prison gangs consider membership is for life. Back door parole - to die in prison Bucket – county jail
  47. 47. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century  Buster –fraudulent gang member  Catch cold – to get killed  Click up – getting along well with a homeboy, not looking for trouble  Daddies or Jokers – incarcerated sexual predators who prey on weaker inmates, called “punks  Dancing on the blacktop –getting stabbed  “Doing the Dutch”, Topped off, Dumped, Knocked off – committing suicide 47
  48. 48. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century Jug-up – meal time Killing your number – serving one’s time or getting out on parole Kite – a contraband letter Lifeboat – a pardon
  49. 49. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century Lugger – an inmate who smuggles and possesses contraband and illicit substances Red eye – hard stare Set-tripping – to switch from on gang to another Shank – a knife Street newspapers – graffiti; a communication device for gang members Taking a nap – short jail sentence
  50. 50. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century  Vocabulary in combination with  Hand signs and Gestures  Symbols  Colors  Banners and Flags  Tattoos  Constitutions, Rules, by-laws  Need and desire to belong  Rituals, Rights of Passage  Shared ideology and values… have resulted in gang cultures which are outside of the mainstream culture. 50
  51. 51. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century SUMMARY  Prison gangs of the 21st century have evolved into highly profitable, yet destructive, business enterprises.  Technology allows prison gangs to extend their influence beyond prison walls, into international narcoterrorism.  Prison gangs present a significant threat to the culture and security of the United States.  Law enforcement organizations must work together to control and neutralize the rising influence of security threat groups. 51
  52. 52. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century 52
  53. 53.  References 11: The Prison Clear, T. R., Cole, G. F., & Reisig, M. D. (2008). Chapter Experience. In Michelle Baird, Maureen Staudt and Michael Stranz (Ed.), Introduction to Corrections (pp. 266-289). Mason, Ohio: Thomson Wadsworth.  Danitz, T. (1998, September 28). The Gangs Behind Bars. Retrieved March 7, 2009, from Insight on the News Web site: http://tindarticles.com/p/articles/ mi_1571is  Definition of Gang Type. (n.d.). Retrieved March 2, 2009, from http://www.tbi.state.tn.us  Glossary Inside Prison: Slang for Prison Life. (n.d.). Retrieved March 9, 2009, from Inside Prison Web site: http://www.insideprison.com/glossary.asp  Jackson, n. (n.d.). About Prison Gangs. Retrieved March 2, 2009, from eHow.com Web site: http://www.ehow.com/about_4579324_prison- gangs.html  Major Prison Gangs. (n.d.). Retrieved March 1, 2009, from Florida Department of Corrections Web site: http://wwwdc.state.fl.us/pub/gangs/prison.html  Prison Gangs in the United States: About Violent Gangs. (n.d.). Retrieved March 7, 2009, from United States Department of Justice Web site: http://www.usdoj.gov/criminal/gangunit/about/prisongangs  Prison Gangs: Definitions and Trends. (n.d.). Retrieved March 2, 2009, from Answer.com Web site: http://www.answers.com  Recruiting Statistics of New Inmates into Prison Gangs. (n.d.). Retrieved 53 March 8, 2009, from http://www.ngcrc.com/corr2006.html
  54. 54.  Walker, R. (n.d.). Other Prison Gangs--The History and Background of the Non-Traditional Prison Gangs. Retrieved March19, 2009, from Gangs Or Us Web site: http://www.gangsorus.com/otherprison.  Walker, R. (n.d.). Prison Gangs--Aryan Brotherhood. Retrieved March 19, 2009, from Gangs or Us Web site: http://www.gangsorus.com/aryan_brotherhood_prison_gang  Walker, R. (n.d.). Prison Gangs--History of La Neustra Familia Prison Gang. Retrieved March 19, 2009, from Gangs or Us Web site: http://www.gangsorus.com/nuestra_familia_prison_gang  Walker, R. (n.d.). Prison Gangs--History of the Black Guerilla Family Prison Gang. Retrieved March 19, 2009, from Gangs or Ur Web site: http://www.gangsorus.com/black_guerrilla_family_prison_gang  Walker, R. (n.d.). Prison Gangs--History of the Mexican Mafia Prison Gang. Retrieved from Gangs or Us Web site: http://www.gangsorus.com/mexican_mafia_prison_gang  Walker, R. (n.d.). Prison Gangs--History of the Neta Association Prison Gang. Retrieved March 19, 2009, from Gangs or Us Web site: http://www.gangsorus.com/neta_association_gang  Walker, R. (n.d.). Prison Gangs--History of the Texas Syndicate Prison Gang. Retrieved from Gangs or Us Web site: http://www.gangsorus.com/texas_syndicate_prison_gang 54
  55. 55. Prison Gangs in the 21st Century By Ridha Ben Hammouda Everest University-South Campus 55
  56. 56. THE END 56
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