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ISCRAM 2013: Applying ISO 9241-110 Dialogue Principles to Tablet Applications in Emergency Medical Services
 

ISCRAM 2013: Applying ISO 9241-110 Dialogue Principles to Tablet Applications in Emergency Medical Services

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Authors: Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg

Authors: Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg

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    ISCRAM 2013: Applying ISO 9241-110 Dialogue Principles to Tablet Applications in Emergency Medical Services ISCRAM 2013: Applying ISO 9241-110 Dialogue Principles to Tablet Applications in Emergency Medical Services Presentation Transcript

    • 1 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Institute for Multimedia and Interactive Systems (IMIS) Applying ISO 9241-110 Dialogue Principles to Tablet Applications in Emergency Medical Services Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg
    • 2 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Agenda • Introduction • Background & Related Work • Applying Dialogue Principles • Conclusion & Further Work
    • 3 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Introduction • potential advantages of mobile computing solutions – enhanced data quantity and quality – pervasive flow of information • Emergency Medical Services (EMS) still rely on paper • replacing paper-based workflows – “not simply a case of giving workers a computer and links to a network” (Sellen & Harper, 2002)
    • 4 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Introduction • usability is crucial to… – user acceptance – delivering added values and benefits • user interface can “either make or break the system” (Vicente, 1999) • considering well-established design principles can… – help to avoid major design flaws – be of great use at any stage of user-centered system design
    • 5 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Introduction
    • 6 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Background & Related Work • need for improving ergonomic design and usability has been identified repeatedly • majority of projects and publications – Mass Casualty Incidents (MCIs) – design in more general – self-defined principles and evaluation criteria • established sets of design rules – eight golden rules of interface design (Shneiderman & Plaisant, 1998) – ten usability heuristics (Nielsen, 1993)
    • 7 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Background & Related Work • considering ISO 9241-110 has certain advantages – connected to other parts of ISO Standard 9241 – validated questionnaires are available – revised by experts from all over the world since the 1980s – proven to work in many application areas – accompanied by various examples and advices – contracting parties make ISO standards part of their contracts
    • 8 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Applying Dialogue Principles suitability for the task conformity with user expectations suitability for learning suitability for individualization self-descriptiveness controllability error tolerance ISO 9241-110:2006
    • 9 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Applying Dialogue Principles • Care & Prepare approach in a nutshell – an application for managing Mass Casualty Incidents (MCIs) has to be a “natural” extension of a daily used system • offer a consistent interaction design • offer clearly distinguishable modes • technology-oriented tasks must be handled by software • application-oriented tasks stay with the human experts Suitability for the Task
    • 10 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Applying Dialogue Principles • input masks and dialogs cannot be the same for managing regular missions and MCIs • consistent user interface – well-known feedback mechanisms – color schemes • minimize the gulf of execution (Norman, 1986) • minimize the gulf of evaluation (Norman, 1986) • users’ mental model of the application system stabilizes and deepens Conformity with User Expectations & Suitability for Learning
    • 11 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Applying Dialogue Principles • “avoid too many alternatives and modes” (Leitner et al., 2007) – users are rarely capable of individualizing systems in their interest and to their benefit (Herczeg, 2009) • possibility to localize applications in advance – e.g. terms, abbreviations, drugs, transport destinations, vehicles • individualization restricted to content Suitability for Individualization
    • 12 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Applying Dialogue Principles • direct access vs. number of visible components – use tabs and foldable elements • button labels should tell about corresponding action – avoid generic labels like “Yes”, “No” or “OK” • sophisticated alarm management is necessary • modal dialogs represent an easy concept Self-Descriptiveness & Controllability
    • 13 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Applying Dialogue Principles Error Tolerance
    • 14 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Conclusion & Further Work • prototype has been presented to more than 40 representatives of 8 EMS and emergency departments – judged to be positive in general – summative evaluation with good results (preliminarily) • ISO 9241-110 should be considered when designing applications in safety-critical mobile contexts
    • 15 / 15 06.07.2013 Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg Institute for Multimedia and Interactive Systems (IMIS) Applying ISO 9241-110 Dialogue Principles to Tablet Applications in Emergency Medical Services Tilo Mentler | Michael Herczeg mentler@imis.uni-luebeck.de