Open Access in 2012 – a developing country perspective

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Keynote address at the EADI-IMWG Workshop, Open for Development, held in Antwerp, 13-14 September 2012

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  • Open Access in 2012 – a developing country perspective

    1. 1. Open Access in 2012 – adeveloping country perspective EADI-IMWG Workshop 13 September 2012
    2. 2. `Yesterday we were a bunch of activists… I-Commons, Dubrovnik 2007
    3. 3. Attribution Some rights reserved by James Cridlandbut now Open Access is in the mainstream
    4. 4. ..for theSTMpublishingindustry, a‘tsunami’…
    5. 5. …as high-level policy initiatives are adopted…
    6. 6. AttributionNoncommercialNo Derivative Works Some rights reserved by riac …based on the right of public access to publicly funded research…
    7. 7. The World Bank
    8. 8. .. transformative uses of information..
    9. 9. UNESCO - OA to scientific information…
    10. 10. OA to increase journalimpact, especially in the developing world
    11. 11. 2010 -12 - The EU Open Aire…
    12. 12. Committing investment to infrastructure development forknowledge preservation and impact
    13. 13. … the UK, where the Finch Report recommends investment in OA journal publishing… http://www.researchinfonet.org/publish/finch/
    14. 14. Earmarking funds for encouragingpublication in open access journals
    15. 15. … with repositories for researchpapers, grey literature and research data..
    16. 16. The first Open Access declaration –2002 An old tradition and a new technology have converged to make possible an unprecedented public good. The old tradition is the willingnessof scientists and scholars to publish the fruits of their research in scholarly journals withoutpayment, for the sake of inquiry and knowledge. The new technology is the internet .. Budapest Open Access Initiative
    17. 17. Why is OA needed?
    18. 18. World Research Publication - 2001 http://www.worldmapper.org 2006 SASI Group (University of Sheffield) and Mark Newman (University of Michigan).
    19. 19. Behind this picture, hierarchies of power exerted through a commercial journal system …http://www.flickr.com/photos/adactio/ CC attribution licence
    20. 20. …in which ‘mainstream’ (i.e publishable in the index) = ‘relevant to the English-speaking global North’Guédon, J. Open Access and the divide between “mainstream” and “peripheral”science, 2008. In Como gerir e qualificar revistas científicas (forthcoming , inPortuguese). (In Press) [Book Chapter].
    21. 21. No known copyright restrictions… the other two-thirds of the world is ‘local’.
    22. 22. Attribution Some rights reserved by Will Clayton…and the emphasis is on competitiveness…
    23. 23. …with the Impact Factor entrenchedas the dominant global measure for research performance…
    24. 24. …there is aproblem… Attribution Some rights reserved by music2work2
    25. 25. …tunnel vision – only about journalshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/adactio/ CC attribution licence
    26. 26. “The public good they make possible is the world-wide electronic distribution of the peer-reviewed journal literature and completely free and unrestricted access to it by all scientists, scholars, teachers, students, and other curious minds.” Budapest Open Access Initiative
    27. 27. Two ‘routes’ to OA - both focus on journalsSome rights reserved by mrhayata
    28. 28. .. The target is increasing exposure and impact…
    29. 29. And this is working - Brazil is now the 3rd largest publisher of OA journals in the world, second only to the USA and the UK.Alperin et al., 2008, Open access and scholarlypublishing in Latin America: ten flavours and afew reflectionsrevista.ibict.br/liinc/index.php/liinc/article/vie
    30. 30. …is this enough? How transformative is the journal focus?http://www.flickr.com/photos/adactio/ CC attribution licence
    31. 31. In the South this month…
    32. 32. Formal publishing is only the tip of the iceberg -Attribution Some rights reserved by natalielucier
    33. 33. SCAP project – aligning scholarlycommunication with national and institutional
    34. 34. Institutions hammered by successive policy changes…AttributionNoncommercialShare Alike Some rights reserved by Peter Curbishley
    35. 35. …to whom we offer technical platforms asthe solution - but the scaffolding is lacking…
    36. 36. …trying to re-establish themselves as global players in higher education…AttributionNoncommercialNo Derivative Works Some rights reserved by Mennonite Church USA Archives
    37. 37. …yet wanting a research contribution to national development ….Some rights reserved by mimaba
    38. 38. …in a clash between collaborative and competitive research values…Attribution Some rights reserved by Anthony_Joel
    39. 39. National policy – about money In the knowledge economyAttributionShare Alike Some rights reserved by 401(K) 2012
    40. 40. …incentive systems areout of line with national and institutional strategies…AttributionNo Derivative Works Some rights reserved by ayomide!
    41. 41. Our universities, inparticular, should bedirecting their researchfocus to address thedevelopment and socialneeds of our communities.The impact of their researchshould be measured by howmuch difference it makes tothe needs of ourcommunities, rather than byjust how many internationalcitations researchers receivein their publications. Blade Nzimande, UNESCO World Conference on Higher Education 2009
    42. 42. What can be done?
    43. 43. Move scholarly communications into the policy mainstream…
    44. 44. Move beyond the journal…
    45. 45. Expand the concept of what a journal is
    46. 46. Work with OA publishers more sympatheticto developing country issues
    47. 47. Open everything – from research toteaching and learning to development impact
    48. 48. Recognise changing patterns of communication in networked collaborative research…
    49. 49. Traditional Scholarship Literature reviewsStudent Conceptual frameworks Bibliographies Proposals Conceptualisation Notes Interview transcripts Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations Engagement Data Analysis Images Reports Audio recordings InterviewsCommunity Findings Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papers Scholar Laura Czerniewicz: The Changing Scholarly Communication and Content Landscape
    50. 50. Open Research Literature reviews Bibliographies Conceptual frameworks Proposals Conceptualisation Notes Interview transcripts Lectures Translation Data sets Data Collection Presentations Engagement Data Analysis Images Reports Audio recordings Interviews Findings Books Conference papers Journal articles Technical papersLaura Czerniewicz: The Changing Scholarly Communication and Content Landscape
    51. 51. A wider range of measure … Altmetrics
    52. 52. Take into account capacity issues in an integrated approach – technicalplatforms on their own do not resolve the issues…
    53. 53. Eve GrayScholarly Communication in Africa Programme University of Cape Town http://www.gray-area.co.za Twitter: graysouth

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