Nonprofit Organizational Capacity Building
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Nonprofit Organizational Capacity Building

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A short overview of organizational capacity and capacity building for the community based nonprofit sector. Includes a discussion of capacities needed for movement building and social impact.

A short overview of organizational capacity and capacity building for the community based nonprofit sector. Includes a discussion of capacities needed for movement building and social impact.

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Nonprofit Organizational Capacity Building Nonprofit Organizational Capacity Building Presentation Transcript

  • Organizational Capacity “the combined influence of an organization’s abilities to govern and manage itself, to develop assets and resources, to forge the right community linkages, and to deliver valued services – all combining to meaningfully address its mission” Dougherty & Mayer (2003) capacity-building efforts can focus in many different organizational areas
  • Organizational Capacity “the combined influence of an organization’s abilities to govern and manage itself, to develop assets and resources, to forge the right community linkages, and to deliver valued services – all combining to meaningfully address its mission” Dougherty & Mayer (2003) capacity-building efforts can focus in many different organizational areas (Venture Philanthropy Partners, 2001)
  • ...or on distinct organizational “systems”
  • ...or on distinct organizational “systems” Cultural System mental models, organizational values, characteristic behaviors, consciousness
  • ...or on distinct organizational “systems” Cultural System mental models, organizational values, characteristic behaviors, consciousness Aspirational System vision, mission, leadership
  • ...or on distinct organizational “systems” Cultural System mental models, organizational values, characteristic behaviors, consciousness Aspirational System vision, mission, leadership Learning System adaptation, reflective practice, enabling structures, teaming
  • ...or on distinct organizational “systems” Cultural System mental models, organizational values, characteristic behaviors, consciousness Aspirational System vision, mission, leadership Learning System adaptation, reflective practice, enabling structures, teaming Management and operations system strategy, structures, operations, coordination, resources, systems, etc
  • ...or on distinct organizational “systems” Cultural System mental models, organizational values, characteristic behaviors, consciousness Aspirational System vision, mission, leadership Learning System adaptation, reflective practice, enabling structures, teaming Management and operations system strategy, structures, operations, coordination, resources, systems, etc Extraorganizational system collaboration, networks, constituent engagement, movement participation, programs (Butcher, et al, 2007)
  • ...or on distinct organizational “systems” Cultural System mental models, organizational values, characteristic behaviors, consciousness Aspirational System vision, mission, leadership Learning System adaptation, reflective practice, enabling structures, teaming Management and strategy, structures, operations, operations coordination, resources, systems, etc system but too often exclusively focused here, neglecting other critical systems Extraorganizational system collaboration, networks, constituent engagement, movement participation, programs (Butcher, et al, 2007)
  • What do community organizations think they need?
  • What did organizations report as “major challenges”? Survey results indicate that a large majority of respondents are encountering major challenges in two areas:! • Development efforts, including a variety of activities (with exception of special events) ! • Enhancing the visibility/reputation of their organization—a marketing/PR activity that is closely linked to 
 development efforts $ Responses from 197 nonprofit organizations, representing a broad spectrum of Miami-Dade nonprofits
  • most important capacity building needs “Looking across results from the various areas it appears that fundraising challenges are the most significant challenges that nonprofits are currently facing. Given the economic climate, this is not surprising.”
  • When respondents’ rankings of minor and major challenges are combined, 11 additional areas of challenge emerged, including: • • • • • • • • • • • Board development - recruiting, retaining, training effective board members (74% experiencing this challenge) ! Undertaking effective special events (73%) ! Enhancing public understanding of key policy issues (71%) ! Undertaking strategic planning (69%) ! Creating, updating, and effectively using databases (69%) ! Creating and implementing a social media strategy (68%) ! Strengthening relationships with key policy makers (68%) ! Recruiting/keeping qualified and reliable volunteers (66%) ! Developing targeted communications to community (65%) ! Evaluating or assessing program outcomes or impact (64%) ! Allocating sufficient time for staff and teams to reflect together on their practice (63%)
  • What would help? “Please describe what you believe would be the most helpful way(s) to meet your organization's most important capacity building needs.”
  • What would help? “Please describe what you believe would be the most helpful way(s) to meet your organization's most important capacity building needs.”
  • Although local respondents to the survey focused on money as their main organizational capacity concern, capacity building is about more than adequate financial resources
  • Capacity building “the application of knowledge and expertise to the enhancement of those factors that contribute to organizational effectiveness”. (Kibbe, 2004, p. 5)
  • Capacity building building organizational capacity is an ongoing process “the application of knowledge and expertise to the enhancement of those factors that contribute to organizational effectiveness”. (Kibbe, 2004, p. 5)
  • Three Categories: How do we go about building organizational capacity? (Backer, Bleeg, & Groves, 2004)
  • Three Categories: How do we go about building organizational capacity? 1. assessment of NPO needs, assets, and readiness for change; (Backer, Bleeg, & Groves, 2004)
  • Three Categories: How do we go about building organizational capacity? 1. assessment of NPO needs, assets, and readiness for change; 2. technical assistance & organization development consultation (e.g., training, coaching, peer networking, provision of print resource materials, and convening); (Backer, Bleeg, & Groves, 2004)
  • Three Categories: How do we go about building organizational capacity? 1. assessment of NPO needs, assets, and readiness for change; 2. technical assistance & organization development consultation (e.g., training, coaching, peer networking, provision of print resource materials, and convening); 3. direct financial support (Backer, Bleeg, & Groves, 2004)
  • Capacity-building approaches that provide “blended solutions” (combining consulting, coaching, training and/or peer exchanges) are especially effective . (Connolly & York, 2003)
  • Capacity-building approaches that provide “blended solutions” (combining consulting, coaching, training and/or peer exchanges) are especially effective . Promising peer-learning practices include:! planning and facilitating “round table discussions”, “case study groups,” and/or “learning circles;” (Connolly & York, 2003)
  • capacity building should focus across three interdependent levels within an emerging social, economic and cultural environment (St. Luke’s Health Initiatives, 2011)
  • “Is the organization’s long-term survivability the goal, or is the goal to build the accomplishment of mission?! These two purposes don’t always completely align.” from McCambridge, Ruth. (2010). “Nonprofit Capacity Building for What?” The Nonprofit Quarterly,Vol. 17: 4, p. 8.
  • A Continuum of Growth and Development along Four Stages National Gender & Equity Campaign (2011)
  • A Continuum of Growth and Development along Four Stages National Gender & Equity Campaign (2011)
  • A Continuum of Growth and Development along Four Stages National Gender & Equity Campaign (2011)
  • National Gender & Equity Campaign (2011)
  • there are key differences between capacity building for! organizational sustainability & capacity building for social justice & change The Building Movement Project - www.buildingmovement.org
  • In social justice organizations, big vision and ambitious goals are motivating to the staff; however, the lack of people capacity to reach the scale of success organizations seek can end up exhausting everyone. Kim, H., & Kunreuther, F. (2012)
  • GENERATIONS SERIES VISION FOR CHANGE: A New Wave of Social Justice Leadership Helen Kim & Frances Kunreuther Kim, H., & Kunreuther, F. (2012).Vision for Change: A New Wave of Social Justice Leadership. Generations Series. New York: Building Movement Project. Retrieved from http://www.buildingmovement.org/ news/entry/340
  • GENERATIONS SERIES VISION FOR CHANGE: A New Wave of Social Justice Leadership Helen Kim & Frances Kunreuther Kim, H., & Kunreuther, F. (2012).Vision for Change: A New Wave of Social Justice Leadership. Generations Series. New York: Building Movement Project. Retrieved from http://www.buildingmovement.org/ news/entry/340 the internal work – especially finding and developing the right staff, overseeing financial and organizational growth, and creating diverse revenue streams – often consumed young leaders who had little experience or support in these areas. Many expressed the need for better management skills as they sought to implement internal organizational changes to move towards their vision.
  • Internal Focus
  • Internal Focus For all of the talk of strategic partnerships, collaboration and networks, the nonprofit sector remains mired in an organization-centric view of the world. Indeed, there is an industry of consultants, lawyers, accountants, funders and others who are focused on ! organizational capacity building
  • Internal Focus For all of the talk of strategic partnerships, collaboration and networks, the nonprofit sector remains mired in an world. Indeed, there is an industry of consultants, lawyers, accountants, funders and others who are focused on organizational capacity building In a self-referential wheel of mutual support. Their livelihood and programs depend on fostering organizational improvement that leads to improved outcomes and strong communities. The downside is that a fixation on the internal operations of organizations can lead to a preoccupation with organizational sustainability and performance while paying less attention to the critical importance of nurturing networks – other organizations, individuals, sectors – to achieving community change of any significance. In a word, strong organizations are a necessary, but hardly sufficient,! condition of large-scale social change. Kania, J., Kramer, M. (2011). “Collective Impact.” Stanford Social Innovation Review, http://www.ssireview.org/site/printer/collective_impact. !
  • How do we build intra-, inter-, and extra-organizational capacity in social change organizations in ways that takes into consideration social change goals and the values through which social change organizations operate?