0
Jennifer Evans
Assistant Director ELA
St. Clair County RESA
Evans.jennifer@sccresa.org
http://www.protopage.com/evans.jenn...
Agenda

Homework

Review Mini Lesson

Guided
Reading

Daily
Reading
Process

Homework
Homework Discussion
Discussion of Homework: Article –
Assessing Adolescents‟ Motivation to
Read
m.socrative.com
Join roo...
Small Group Review
Name

Reading
Level

Interests

Strengths

Strategies QSI
Needed
Level
Daily Reading Process
Mini-lesson: teacher modeling and explanation

guided practice

independent practice accompanied by ...
Guided Reading Lesson Plan
Template
Why Guided Reading?

Guided reading helps
students to understand
particular texts and to
use a range of reading
and thinki...
“Reading instruction is most effective when
teachers actively monitor students as they
are reading by „cueing children to ...
Both NRP and Duke and Pearson (2002) agree
that explicit teaching, including an explanation
of what and how the strategy s...
Statistics
The number of adults that are classified as functionally
illiterate increases by about 2.25 million each year.
...
43 % of those whose
literacy skills are
lowest live in poverty.

Two-thirds of students
who cannot read
proficiently by th...
When Using Guided Reading

Students have a
high accuracy rate
in reading when
the appropriate
level text is chosen
for the...
Where do I begin?


One of the first and most important things to be aware of is that Guided
Reading is very different fr...
Getting Started


Identify the amount of time you are going to set aside for Guided Reading
each day. Each group should m...
Various models of Guided Reading
Take time with
your group to
discuss the
various models
for guided
reading groups.

Decid...
Guided
Reading……………………


IS………..



IS NOT…………..

 Small group

 Whole group

 Leveled text

 From the basal

 Homo...
Why Can‟t I Just Use The Basal?









Focuses on teaching isolated skills, rather than
fostering an enjoyment and ...
But if you must…


Harcourt can be the foundation

 Works best for on-level students
 Struggling readers and advanced r...
Question: What do I do about
worksheets and workbook pages?
 …as

little as possible
 Three criteria for a good
workshee...
Plan a Mini-lesson:


With your table groups, prepare a minilesson to teach.
 What skill/strategy will you teach?
 How ...
Mini Lesson
Each day you will start your literacy block with a 10 -15
minute mini lesson. For this activity, you will pick...
Choosing the Right Book
Choose a book that is at your target audience‟s „Instructional Level.‟

Independent
• 95-100%
accu...
Mini-lesson Choices
Key Points for Thinking Aloud:
Select text with attention to modeling options
Preview text to locate possible think aloud ...
Guided Reading FAQ Video


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txCQo_8GiU (9min)
Essential Elements of Guided
Reading

Before

After

During
Logistics

Who:

How many:

How long:

•Children at the same
instructional level

•Groups should
consist of 3-8 students

...
Group Questions
How big can the
groups be?

How often do we
meet?

Who meets with
groups?

What can the
paraprofessionals
...
Teacher‟s Role
Before:

During:

-Selects appropriate text.
-Prepares an introduction to the
story.
-Previews some challen...
Student‟s Role
Before:

During:

-Use prior knowledge to make
predictions about the story.
-Engage in conversations about
...
Before Reading:










Picture walk
Text Structure
Genre
Preview/ Review Vocabulary
Discussion
Book introducti...
During Reading:

Focus on Comprehension
Strategy While…

 Students read text

through:
○ Choral
○ Echo
○ Partner
○ Indepe...
Round Robin Reading
GOOD-BY ROUND ROBIN By Dr.
Timothy Rasinski and Dr. Michael
Opitz
Exemplary classrooms provide:
Conversation about the texts students read
(Allington & Johnston, 2001)
Literate conversatio...
After Reading:











Graphic organizer
Questioning
Summarize
Discussion
Graphic Organizer
Sort
Redo the end...
What are the other children
doing?









Word Study/Making
Words
Independent Reading
Big Book
Writing
Poetry
Co...
Partner Reading












Carefully assign partners.
Decide how often you need to change
partners.
Decide wher...
During Partner Reading:


Variations:
 “Take turn days”
 “Ask question days”
 “Sticky note days”
 “You decide days”
Guided Reading Videos


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9c8EI1e
5rl4&list=PL8D0AACAAD5AFF839 (2 min.
Guided Reading Organi...
Example guided reading lesson plan
Group: A

Book: The Hungry Giant

Level: 10

Comprehension Strategy : Making prediction...
Analyze Lesson

At your tables identify
if this was a good or
bad lesson.

Work together to
identify the good and
bad comp...
Practice:
Prepare to write a guided reading lesson.
Practice:


At your tables, select a guided reading
book.



Work as a group to write an appropriate
guided reading less...
Homework:

Read Research Base
for Guided Reading
as an Instructional
Approach and be
prepared to discuss.

Next time you c...
Reading workshop series day 3
Reading workshop series day 3
Reading workshop series day 3
Reading workshop series day 3
Reading workshop series day 3
Reading workshop series day 3
Reading workshop series day 3
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Transcript of "Reading workshop series day 3"

  1. 1. Jennifer Evans Assistant Director ELA St. Clair County RESA Evans.jennifer@sccresa.org http://www.protopage.com/evans.jennifer
  2. 2. Agenda Homework Review Mini Lesson Guided Reading Daily Reading Process Homework
  3. 3. Homework Discussion Discussion of Homework: Article – Assessing Adolescents‟ Motivation to Read m.socrative.com Join room 980994 Type response to question: What did you find was the most valuable piece of information for you in the chapter?
  4. 4. Small Group Review Name Reading Level Interests Strengths Strategies QSI Needed Level
  5. 5. Daily Reading Process Mini-lesson: teacher modeling and explanation guided practice independent practice accompanied by feedback application of the strategies in real reading situations Dr. Pearson emphasizes that comprehension instruction must be embedded in texts rather than taught in isolation through workbook pages.
  6. 6. Guided Reading Lesson Plan Template
  7. 7. Why Guided Reading? Guided reading helps students to understand particular texts and to use a range of reading and thinking strategies on other texts. Guided reading enables authentic, ongoing monitoring of students‟ literacy development which helps to prevent...
  8. 8. “Reading instruction is most effective when teachers actively monitor students as they are reading by „cueing children to use their knowledge of words to decode unknown words in context‟ (Clay, 1993) and assisting them in recognizing and correcting miscues” (Garan, 2007, p. 209). Allows children to feel successful in reading. Basals are full of excerpts so children do not always get the full story.
  9. 9. Both NRP and Duke and Pearson (2002) agree that explicit teaching, including an explanation of what and how the strategy should be used, teacher modeling and thinking aloud about the strategy, guided practice with the strategy and support for students applying the strategy independently are the steps needed to effectively teach any comprehension strategy.  Comprehension is what it‟s all about!  Reading comprehension – and how to teach it – is probably the area of literacy about which we have the most knowledge and the most consensus.  It is also probably the area that gets the least attention in the classroom. 
  10. 10. Statistics The number of adults that are classified as functionally illiterate increases by about 2.25 million each year. One child in four grows up not knowing how to read. 44 million adults in the U.S. can't read well enough to read a simple story to a child. 21 million Americans can't read at all, 45 million are marginally illiterate, and one-fifth of high school graduates can't read their diplomas.
  11. 11. 43 % of those whose literacy skills are lowest live in poverty. Two-thirds of students who cannot read proficiently by the end of the 4th grade will end up in jail or on welfare. 90% of welfare recipients are high school dropouts. 70% of America's prison inmates are illiterate and 85% of all juvenile offenders have reading problems. When the State of Arizona projects how many prison beds it will need, it factors in the number of kids who read well in fourth grade. 16 to 19 year old girls at the poverty level and below, with below average skills, are 6 times more likely to have out-of-wedlock children than their reading counterparts.
  12. 12. When Using Guided Reading Students have a high accuracy rate in reading when the appropriate level text is chosen for them. Students are provided with the necessary strategies to overcome “reading road blocks.” The focus of reading shifts to meaning rather than decoding; the construction of meaning is imperative. Students have the opportunity to apply independent reading strategies with the guidance and support of their teacher and observe proper reading strategies, as modeled by their teacher and peers.
  13. 13. Where do I begin?  One of the first and most important things to be aware of is that Guided Reading is very different from traditional reading instruction. In order to be successful you must have an open mind and be willing to change.  Understand that you will probably have to try several different ways of incorporating Guided Reading in your classroom to find the most effective Guided Reading setup that works for you and your students.   Realize the importance of scheduling and routine. Without being able to stick to your new routine / schedule, it will be very difficult to implement Guided Reading and stick with it. Realize that Guided Reading takes more preparation than typical reading instruction. If you put the time in to prepare ahead of time things will run much more smoothly and your kids are destined for success!
  14. 14. Getting Started  Identify the amount of time you are going to set aside for Guided Reading each day. Each group should meet for approximately 20 minutes.  Set up a weekly schedule for the days you plan on meeting with each of your groups.  Decide how many reading groups you will have in your class. Remember, these groups should be very close in reading level/ability. One key factor in setting up your groups is keeping numbers small. If you get more than five or six students in a group, you are likely not meeting the needs of individual students.  Identify what the other students will be doing during Guided Reading. (Centers, focusing on other literacy skills, etc.).  Determine how you will assess student learning and growth in reading groups and during independent center activities.
  15. 15. Various models of Guided Reading Take time with your group to discuss the various models for guided reading groups. Decide on the model you would like to use Identify pros and cons of each
  16. 16. Guided Reading……………………  IS………..  IS NOT…………..  Small group  Whole group  Leveled text  From the basal  Homogeneous groups  Students are reading  Flexible groups  Essential component of a reading program     reader Heterogeneous grouping Teacher reading Inflexible grouping Optional Refer to the Essential Elements of Guided Reading Handout
  17. 17. Why Can‟t I Just Use The Basal?      Focuses on teaching isolated skills, rather than fostering an enjoyment and appreciation of reading for its own sake. More time is spent on the supplemental worksheets than on actually reading authentic texts. Many times teachers read the story to the students or play the tape as the students follow along because the text is too difficult for many to read independently. The quality of the literature works are chosen mainly to allow skills practice and may not be particularly meaningful, authentic, or interesting. Controlled vocabulary
  18. 18. But if you must…  Harcourt can be the foundation  Works best for on-level students  Struggling readers and advanced readers need more or different  All readers need real literature   Key: look at needs of students Other options  Book rooms ○ Will be expanding ○ Appreciate suggestions for reading materials  School library  Classroom libraries  Online libraries   Cover the same skills with the leveled readers Use the strategies/skills for your mini-lessons
  19. 19. Question: What do I do about worksheets and workbook pages?  …as little as possible  Three criteria for a good worksheet… 1. Must involve some reading and/or writing 2. Majority of my class (80%) must be able to do it independently 3. Students must need work on that skill
  20. 20. Plan a Mini-lesson:  With your table groups, prepare a minilesson to teach.  What skill/strategy will you teach?  How will you engage students?  How will you teach the skill/strategy?  How will you be sure your students are applying the lesson independently?  Present brief overview of lesson to group
  21. 21. Mini Lesson Each day you will start your literacy block with a 10 -15 minute mini lesson. For this activity, you will pick a shared reading book, article, or poem that focuses on a specific reading topic. Your mini lesson will have the same focus for your entire class and will be taught in a whole group setting. Possible Mini Lesson Topics: • Choosing just right books. • Making predictions before reading. •Introducing and discussing different themes. • Introducing literary language. • Self questioning • Retelling • Identifying and practicing specific reading strategies. • Vocabulary •Cause / Effect •Making connections with the text. • Constructing mental images. • Identifying the main idea of the story, passage, or poem.
  22. 22. Choosing the Right Book Choose a book that is at your target audience‟s „Instructional Level.‟ Independent • 95-100% accuracy • Independent/ SelfSustained Reading Instructional • 90-94% accuracy • Guided Reading Hard • 89% and less • Frustration level Select a text that will challenge the reader a little, but will allow them to be successful with the instructional scaffolds you provide them.
  23. 23. Mini-lesson Choices
  24. 24. Key Points for Thinking Aloud: Select text with attention to modeling options Preview text to locate possible think aloud points Be precise about why you‟re thinking aloud Be precise about when you‟re thinking aloud vs. reading aloud  Limit think aloud focus to one strategy (unless the purpose is to build on strategies previously taught_  Be clear about how being metacognitive helps you comprehend  Be clear that students will be expected to be metacognitive in the same way in their own text    
  25. 25. Guided Reading FAQ Video  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txCQo_8GiU (9min)
  26. 26. Essential Elements of Guided Reading Before After During
  27. 27. Logistics Who: How many: How long: •Children at the same instructional level •Groups should consist of 3-8 students •Every day for 20-30 minutes per group
  28. 28. Group Questions How big can the groups be? How often do we meet? Who meets with groups? What can the paraprofessionals be doing now? Struggling readers/belowlevel groups (every day) Classroom teacher meets with EVERY group. Work with groups of students reviewing skills/strategies already covered Proficient/on-level groups (5-6) Proficient/on-level groups (4 days) Future considerationGuided reading training for paraprofessionals Conference with students as they read independently Advanced/abovelevel groups (7-8) Advanced/above level groups (every other day) Struggling readers/belowlevel groups (3-4) Help students as they work at centers
  29. 29. Teacher‟s Role Before: During: -Selects appropriate text. -Prepares an introduction to the story. -Previews some challenging word patterns, vocabulary, and concepts that are present in the story. -Focuses on a particular skill or strategy. -Occasionally creates extension activities to improve fluency, decoding, and comprehension. - “Listens in” to what students are reading. -Interacts with individual students to address specific challenges. -Observes student strategy use and takes anecdotal notes. -Confirms student‟s problemsolving attempts and their success using a particular strategy. After: - Facilitates a discussion on the book. -Assess student‟s response to what they read. -Returns to the text to point out one or two teaching points that reflect the main purpose of the lesson. -Points out strategies used by students during their independent reading.
  30. 30. Student‟s Role Before: During: -Use prior knowledge to make predictions about the story. -Engage in conversations about the story with their teacher and peers. -Raise questions. -Review strategies to assist them in being a successful independent reader. -Listen to preview information from teacher to improve likelihood of success. - Read text softly to self. -Implement strategies to improve decoding and comprehension. -Use preview information, vocabulary, skill to improve reading ability and comprehension. -Ask for help after using strategies provided. After: -Retell the story in its entirety. -Check predictions. -Revisit portions of text that were challenging and share strategies used for success. -Point out previewed information as it was found in the text. -Engage in extension activities to improve decoding skills or comprehension of text.
  31. 31. Before Reading:          Picture walk Text Structure Genre Preview/ Review Vocabulary Discussion Book introduction Prediction Chart Reread previous guided reading book (k-2) Build sentences from a previous guided reading book(k-2)  KWL Chart , Thinking Map etc. to activate schema
  32. 32. During Reading: Focus on Comprehension Strategy While…  Students read text through: ○ Choral ○ Echo ○ Partner ○ Independent ○ Paraphrase ○ Summarize The comprehension strategy used during guided reading should have been taught to students, whole group; during guided reading students are able to practice the strategy with teacher support and in instructional level text. The primary purpose of reading is to obtain meaning from text. Even at the K-2 level students need to be reading to make meaning from text. NOT ROUND ROBIN!
  33. 33. Round Robin Reading
  34. 34. GOOD-BY ROUND ROBIN By Dr. Timothy Rasinski and Dr. Michael Opitz
  35. 35. Exemplary classrooms provide: Conversation about the texts students read (Allington & Johnston, 2001) Literate conversations mimic the conversations real readers in the real world have about real books they really want to talk about!  Conduct discussions with readers as conversations – not interrogations.  Model types of connections readers make (T-S, T-T, T-W).  Arrange for students to have literate conversations in small groups.
  36. 36. After Reading:           Graphic organizer Questioning Summarize Discussion Graphic Organizer Sort Redo the ending of the story Act out the story Rebuilding/rereading sentences from text Draw or write a response to the story
  37. 37. What are the other children doing?         Word Study/Making Words Independent Reading Big Book Writing Poetry Computer/iPad Listening Extension activity Handwriting Strategy work Vocabulary Reading Logs Skill Activity Challenges Fun Folder Activity Content Areas Writing Workshop Newspaper Activity Book Response
  38. 38. Partner Reading           Carefully assign partners. Decide how often you need to change partners. Decide where partners will meet. Decide how to handle absent partners. Decide how partners will read each selection. (Variations in partner reading) Make sure partners have a purpose for reading. Set a time limit. Provide a “filler” for partners who finish before the rest of the class. Model the expected behavior. Be visible.
  39. 39. During Partner Reading:  Variations:  “Take turn days”  “Ask question days”  “Sticky note days”  “You decide days”
  40. 40. Guided Reading Videos  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9c8EI1e 5rl4&list=PL8D0AACAAD5AFF839 (2 min. Guided Reading Organization - Heinenmann)  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBy6Bg o7lvg (8 min. 3 grade lesson) rd  Fountas and Pinnell CD 1st chapter
  41. 41. Example guided reading lesson plan Group: A Book: The Hungry Giant Level: 10 Comprehension Strategy : Making predictions Essential Question: How do I make predictions as I read? Before: Create a prediction chart. Have students look at the cover of the book and make predictions for the story. During: 1. Introduce vocabulary words: bommy-knocker and roared. 2. Choral read with students 1. On page 13 stop and have students revisit their predictions. Check to see if they still think their predictions will be true. 3. Partner read with students 4. Independent read After: Revisit the prediction chart and have students compare the story ending to their predictions.
  42. 42. Analyze Lesson At your tables identify if this was a good or bad lesson. Work together to identify the good and bad components of the lesson.
  43. 43. Practice: Prepare to write a guided reading lesson.
  44. 44. Practice:  At your tables, select a guided reading book.  Work as a group to write an appropriate guided reading lesson.  Be ready to explain the comprehension strategy used, before, during, and after activities with the group.
  45. 45. Homework: Read Research Base for Guided Reading as an Instructional Approach and be prepared to discuss. Next time you come bring a lesson plan for a guided reading group
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