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Frayer model 20110329_115445_46
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Frayer model 20110329_115445_46

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  • 1. Frayer Model The Frayer Model is a categorization strategy that helps students understand new concepts. In the first example (below), students provide a definition, list of characteristics, and provide examples and non-examples of the concept. In the second example (below), students analyze a word’s essential and nonessential characteristics and refine their understanding by choosing examples and non-examples of the concept. There are many concepts or key vocabulary terms in the content areas that can be confusing. This strategy provides students with the opportunity to understand what a concept is and what it is not. It gives students an opportunity to explain their understanding and to elaborate by providing examples and non-examples from their own lives. Procedure: • Assign a concept or key vocabulary term that might be confusing or new to students. • Explain the Frayer model diagram below. • Have the students read text material. • Identify evidence of examples and non-examples from the text. Definition (in own words) Characteristics Examples Non-examples Adapted from: Teaching Reading in Science, Mary Lee Barton and Deborah L. Jordan, McREL (Mid-continent Research for Education and Learning, 2001, p. 53

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