How Community and Product Teams Can Build Awesome Products Together

1,574 views
1,473 views

Published on

Community managers play a critical role in developing a healthy ecosystem around many great companies. But many community teams struggle to communicate with their product teams to make sure the knowledge they have leads to the right things and the best possible solutions get built to help make their companies succeed.

This talk explains the product development process and how community team members can contribute in productive ways during each step in the process.

Published in: Internet, Technology, Sports
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,574
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
57
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Read this story: http://bit.ly/CMXcookies
    Community sometimes eats product’s cookies and they don’t even know it.
    This talk will help you better understand product’s process and how a
    Community team member can contribute without “eating their cookies.”
  • PMs seek out data, customer insights, and other information to inform product decisions.
  • PMs decide what to build next based on greatest customer needs & business interests.
  • The feature is built with the help of design and engineering.
  • PMs coordinate with sales, marketing, and others on the
    release of the feature/solution.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • It’s like magic; a million features usually condense into a handful of problems when you get to the core of what they’re trying to do when they ask for a feature.  Realize though that the PM is talking to sales, marketing, the founder with their vision, directly to various customers to get signal, as well as looking at their analytics...it can be overwhelming and it’s part art, part science to distill priorities.

    Visual: Show whole lot of features addressing the same problem?
    - describe the same thing a bunch of different ways…show they’re all the same thing.

    What the customer may be asking could be totally overkill or unbeknownst to them, there’s a better solution out there you guys an deliver
  • Use 5 Why’s to really understand why a user wants something.
    NEED AN EXAMPLE!

    I want a louder alarm clock
    Bc I have trouble getting up in the morning
    Bc I stay up too late working
    Bc I’m trying to do too many things
    Bc I don’t manage my time well

    So the alarm clock app doesn’t need to build a louder alarm clock. They should give me some tips for better managing my time and going to bed earlier.

  • Yelling doesn’t make you get what you want. Neither does bugging the hell out of your PM.

    Understand they’re doing the best they can on lots of things.
    - they’re trying to act on the best information they have and they likely heard you already, so instead you should…

  • Also ask your PM how they prioritize things so you can deliver it to them relevant

    In general, there are 3 benefits any feature added can bring:
    1) Save time (for someone on the team, or for users)
    2) Save or make money
    3) Delight users (which is great for marketing and can often lead to more money)

  • If you don’t have access to numbers, try to work with those you can. Whatever numbers you can get is a good exercise for you to be more data driven.

    Also realize that data can be Qualitative or Quantitative. So, if you can’t get the hard Quantitative numbers, then do your best to be Qualitative; do you know a core persona that is a large part of your user base? Relay the stories of a few users that are representative of that larger group and you can also make a really good case as well. (of course, the best is BOTH)
  • No one knew how much time the community manager was spending dealing with spammers
    Didn’t know how much time and she hadn’t quantified it until she talked to a product person at lunch about it.

    Problem: Spammers flooded the site.
    Manually deleting apps was consuming tons of our community manager’s time.
    Spammers negatively impacted the perception of our site.

    Solution: Engineering invested in better spam filters and easier mass deletion of submissions.
  • My name is phonetic so you pronounce it in four chunks: Kras no deb ska :-) 
  • - Help the PM with an “early access” group who is happy to try things out early and give feedback before a wider launch. It usually makes people feel special and helps the PM so everyone wins.
  • When we launched Toolkits, which was a collection of Twitter apps that users of our site could use to curate their favorite apps, we got some great influencers, like David Armano and Steve Rubel and Guy Kawasaki to make toolkits.

    This fed right into our PR, gave us great examples to refer people to, got influencers on our product, and set a good example for what other users could do with it.
  • Goal isn’t to throw people under the bus.
    Also avoid sounding like a division: “They’re working on this…” vs. “We’re working on this…”
    It changes your ownership of any issues or feedback. One team
    Also build camaradarie…they you’re more invested in getting word on the solution.


  • As your company grows, a spectrum becomes more important.
    When you’re small, power users drive what the rest of the world wants
    later, they want ridiculous features that no one else wants or needs.

    You as a community manager should have a breadth of relationships in the community and help the PM team to cultivate them as well
    A good team work means just like you come to them when you need a feature, they can come to you when they need a group to talk to that already has a relationship
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • PMs listen for customer feedback and data post launch. They work with design & engineering to tweak & improve the feature.
  • Remember:
    Don’t assume you know the other person’s perspective. Understand the
    Product team’s process and you’ll know how to not eat their cookies.
  • How Community and Product Teams Can Build Awesome Products Together

    1. 1. Jason @Evanish June 12, 2014
    2. 2. Let me tell you a story… By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    3. 3. By @Evanish #CMXSummit Goal Today: Teach you the Product Development process.
    4. 4. The Product Lifecycle 1: Gather Signal 1 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    5. 5. The Product Lifecycle 1: Gather Signal 2: Prioritize 1 2 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    6. 6. The Product Lifecycle 1: Gather Signal 2: Prioritize 3: Build 1 2 3 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    7. 7. The Product Lifecycle 1: Gather Signal 2: Prioritize 4: Launch 3: Build 1 2 3 4 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    8. 8. The Product Lifecycle 1: Gather Signal 5: Iterate 2: Prioritize 4: Launch 3: Build 1 2 3 4 5 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    9. 9. 1: Gather Signal 1 2 3 4 5 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    10. 10. Don’t Give Them a Huge Feature Request List. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    11. 11. Do help them understand customer problems. By @Evanish #CMXSummit By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    12. 12. Use 5 Why’s Root Cause Analysis Why? The Real Problem. Why? Why? Why? By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    13. 13. Example: Big feature request vs. small feature update By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    14. 14. 1: Gather Signal Goal Communicate Problems, not Features. Ask why. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    15. 15. 2: Prioritize 1 2 3 4 5 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    16. 16. Don’t take “No” personally. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    17. 17. 17 Do help them understand the business impact. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    18. 18. Quantify what you relay to your Product team • How much time are you spending on this task? • How many users does this impact? • How many users are churning because of this? • How would solving this increase revenue? By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    19. 19. Example: oneforty spammers By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    20. 20. 2: Prioritize Goal Quantify & share the value of your problems. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    21. 21. 3: Build 1 2 3 4 5 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    22. 22. Don’t try to do the their job. By @Evanish #CMXSummit “… in my excitement I told product what I thought the community wanted, and then how exactly to make it and what it should look like Natalia Krasnodebska … I managed to piss off every product manager on the team.”
    23. 23. Do bring community into the product. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    24. 24. Ways to get community into the product • Dog food features pre launch. • Invite Product into conversations with the community. • Share examples from others. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    25. 25. Example: Product Hunt By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    26. 26. 3: Build Goal Build a product that fits your community. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    27. 27. 4: Launch 1 2 3 4 5 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    28. 28. Don’t promise a release date to your community. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    29. 29. 29 Do help the product team with early adopter users. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    30. 30. How to collaborate on a launch By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    31. 31. Example: oneforty toolkits By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    32. 32. 4: Launch Goal Build excitement and involve users early. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    33. 33. 5: Iterate 1 2 3 4 5 By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    34. 34. Don’t separate yourself from the product team. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    35. 35. Launch Story Do help product understand community feedback. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    36. 36. Do help product understand community feedback. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    37. 37. How to connect product to the community. • Introduce the users who requested the feature. • Relay feedback. • Connect Product to a spectrum of users. • Share how you make passionate, power users. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    38. 38. Example: Customer drinks and dinners By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    39. 39. 5: Iterate Goal Bring the voice of the community to product. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    40. 40. 1: Gather Signal 1 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    41. 41. 1: Problems, not Features 1 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    42. 42. 1: Problems, not Features 2: Prioritize 1 2 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    43. 43. 1: Problems, not Features 2: Quantify Value 1 2 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    44. 44. 1: Problems, not Features 2: Quantify Value 3: Build 1 2 3 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    45. 45. 1: Problems, not Features 2: Quantify Value 3: Add the Personality 1 2 3 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    46. 46. 1: Problems, not Features 2: Quantify Value 4: Launch 3: Add the Personality 1 2 3 4 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    47. 47. 1: Problems, not Features 2: Quantify Value 4: Engage & Excite 3: Add the Personality 1 2 3 4 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    48. 48. 1: Problems, not Features 5: Iterate 2: Quantify Value 4: Engage & Excite 3: Add the Personality 1 2 3 4 5 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    49. 49. 1: Problems, not Features 5: Bring their Voice 2: Quantify Value 4: Engage & Excite 3: Add the Personality 1 2 3 4 5 By @Evanish #CMXSummit Community & the Product Lifecycle
    50. 50. By @Evanish #CMXSummit
    51. 51. Jason Evanish Evanish.J@gmail.com Twitter: @Evanish Check out my startup: GetLighthouse.com Sign up for my ebook: BeCustomerDriven.com

    ×