CCNA Routing and Switching Lesson 04 - Topology & Design - Eric Vanderburg

  • 201 views
Uploaded on

CCNA Routing and Switching Lesson 04 - Topology & Design - Eric Vanderburg

CCNA Routing and Switching Lesson 04 - Topology & Design - Eric Vanderburg

More in: Technology , Business
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
201
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Network Topology & Design Chapter 4 Networking Essentials – Eric Vanderburg © 2005
  • 2. Bus topology  Bus topology advantages     Inexpensive Easy to design Easy to implement Bus topology disadvantages   Difficult to troubleshoot Requires termination
  • 3. Star topology  Star topology advantages      Break in one cable does not affect other devices (except up links) Easy to locate problems Easy to install Does not require termination like bus topology Star topology disadvantages    Center of star topology device (hub) can be expensive Hub failure can affect entire topology Amount of cable is expensive
  • 4. Ring topology  Ring topology advantages Prevents network collisions  Each station acts like a repeater   Ring topology disadvantages Cable break can affect all devices  Temporarily shut down network to add a new station  Maintenance and monitoring is difficult 
  • 5. Network Architecture  IEEE 802 CSMA/CD (802.3)  Token Ring (802.5)   NADN (Nearest Active Downstream Neighbor)  NAUN (Nearest Active Upstream Neighbor)  Node with the token can send data  Predictable send/receive time Wireless Technologies (802.11)  FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface) 
  • 6. Media  Twisted-Pair cabling have the following in common Copper based data transmission  Copper wires come in pairs  Each Wire of a pair is twisted around each other to protect against NEXT (Near End Crosstalk)  Copper wires are enclosed in a sheath  All wire pairs are enclosed in a sheath 
  • 7. Media (continued)  UTP (Unshielded twisted-pair)  Advantages of UTP cable       Disadvantages of UTP cable    Thin and flexible Easy to install Many modern buildings come with CAT 5 installed Small size does not fill up wiring ducts fast Inexpensive per foot Susceptible to interference Cable length is 100 meters or 328 feet RJ (Register Jacks)  RJ-45
  • 8. Media (continued)
  • 9. Media (continued)  STP (Shielded twisted-pair)  Advantages of STP cable     Greater protection from interference Thin and flexible Overall it is easy to install Disadvantages of STP cable     Inexpensive per foot but more than UTP STP must be grounded, problems exists if not grounded properly More difficult to install than UTP Small size but does fill up wiring ducts faster than UTP
  • 10. Media (continued)  Coaxial cabling (Thicknet and Thinnet)  Advantages of coaxial cabling     Cable lengths are longer than UTP/STP Less susceptible to interference than UTP Hubs are not required, direct connection Disadvantages of coaxial cabling    Thicknet is very difficult to install More expensive than UTP Difficult to troubleshoot
  • 11. Media (continued)  Thinnet and Thicknet Connectors RG-58 cabling  BNC  AUI (Attachment unit interface)  Barrel connectors  T-connectors  Terminators 
  • 12. Media (continued)  Fiber-Optic cable  Advantages of fiberoptic cabling Transmit data over long distances  Not susceptible to EMI  High transmission rates  Not susceptible to eavesdropping  Small cable size Disadvantages of fiber-optic cabling      Expensive Cable can be easily damaged during install making installations more difficult Manual termination of ends is time consuming
  • 13. Fiber Optic Connectors ST (Straight Tip) LC (Link Control) SC (Straight Connection) MIC (Medium Interface Connector) MT-RJ two cables in one RJ-45 clone SMA (Subminiature Type A)
  • 14. Signal Degradation (continued)  Reduce EMI/RFI  Do not place copper media next to  Fluorescent lights  Generators/motors  High-voltage electrical wire Proper installation  Use quality cable  Use shielded cabling  Use repeaters to strengthen signal on long cable runs 
  • 15. Cabling Horizontal Cabling – cables going from the wiring closet to end nodes  Vertical Cabling – Backbone of the network 
  • 16. Wiring Closets   MDF (Main distribution facility) – Central wiring closet when more than one is used IDF (Intermediate distribution facility) – wiring closets off the MDF
  • 17. LAN Design Models  Two basic design strategies  Mesh  all routers are peers, interconnected, and exchanging information  Easy to set up  Hierarchical  Easy to troubleshoot  Easier to manage  Can scale better  Can obtain better performance data
  • 18. LAN Design Models  Three-layer network model Core – WAN connectivity between sites (usually owned by the ISP)  Distribution – Connects buildings on the LAN or wiring closets in a building  Access layer – Connects nodes into the network 
  • 19. Acronyms          AC, Alternating Current AUI, Attachment Unit Interface CMIP, Common Management Information Protocol EIA, Electronic Industries Alliance TIA, Telecommunications Industry Association FDDI, Fiber Distributed Data Interface IDF, Intermediate Distribution Facility MDF, Main Distribution Facility MID, Management Information base
  • 20. Acronyms          MAU, Multistation Access Unit NEXT, Near End Crosstalk NADN, Nearest Active Downstream Neighbor NAUN, Nearest Active Upstream Neighbor POP, Point of Presence SAP, Service Access Point STP, Shielded Twisted Pair TDR, Time Domain Reflectometer UTP, Unshielded Twisted Pair