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Herschel Spire
Herschel Spire
Herschel Spire
Herschel Spire
Herschel Spire
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Herschel Spire

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ESA Space Science Talks March 2009. Dave Clements and Matt Griffin: A profile of the Herschel infrared observatory's SPIRE – Far-IR Photometer and Spectrometer.

ESA Space Science Talks March 2009. Dave Clements and Matt Griffin: A profile of the Herschel infrared observatory's SPIRE – Far-IR Photometer and Spectrometer.

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  • 1. The Herschel SPIRE Instrument Dave Clements, Imperial College London Matt Griffin, SPIRE PI, Cardiff University Schloss Braunschardt 19/3/09
  • 2. SPIRE – Far-IR Photometer and Spectrometer
    • SPIRE consists of two sub-instruments
    • A three colour far-IR Camera
    • Simultaneous images at 250, 350, 500 microns: first time these wavelengths have been explored from space
    • Also parallel mode with PACS
    • An imaging spectrometer
    • Wavelength range 200-670 microns: first spectral coverage from sapce
    • Simultaneous coverage of full wavelength range
    • For both sub-instruments detectors at 0.3K, optics and mechanisms at 2K and 5K
    The SPIRE Instrument | Dave Clements | Herschel | Pag. 2 > SPIRE undergoing lab testing
  • 3. From cosmology to planet formation
    • What the Photometer Will do?
    • Cosmology
    • Find the missing 50% of energy generation in the universe
    • Galaxies evolve very differently in optical and far-IR, with many more far-IR bright objects early on, hiding 50% of energy generation. SPIRE will find and study them.
    • Star and Planet Formation
    • Star and planet formation is inherently dusty phenomenon
    • - SPIRE will find and determine properties of protostars and planetary debris disks
    The SPIRE Instrument | Dave Clements | Herschel | Pag. 2 > SPIRE’s scientific targets SPIRE/PACS
  • 4. From cosmology to planet formation
    • SPIRE Spectrometer: Exploring molecules in space
    • Rich and largely unexplored range of spectral lines in far-IR/submm
    • SPIRE Spectrometer will provide our first chance to study this region
    • Look for water and CO lines
    • Look for complex organic molecules
    • Examine the mineralogy of interplanetary and intersteller dust
    • Survey instrument so not aimed at individual known lines so discovery potential is huge
    The SPIRE Instrument | Dave Clements | Herschel | Pag. 2 > SPIRE Spectrometer targets
  • 5. Handy fact: The SPIRE Photometer can detect power of a 100W lightbulb a million km away - or a low energy bulb (20W) on the Moon. Herschel Blog: http://herschelmission.wordpress.com/ THANK YOU
    • Dave Clements [email_address]

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