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The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
The Future of Value - Presentation
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The Future of Value - Presentation

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  • 1. Value:Eternal Truths/Emerging SurprisesAdvice & Implications From Euro RSCG - January 2008 1
  • 2. AgendaPart 1. Marketing Through a Recession: Time-Tested TipsPart 2. A Snapshot of Today’s ConsumerPart 3. The Value Relationship: What Consumers NeedPart 4. Communicating Value: A Semiotic Analysis 2
  • 3. The Worst Economic Crisis Sincethe Great Depression 3
  • 4. Traditional Marketing Advice 4
  • 5. Playing Offense1. Don’t Cut Advertising 5
  • 6. Playing Offense 1. Don’t Cut Advertising Brands that maintain or increase advertising during recessions increase sales 3x those of brands that cut their budgets300 400 375 350250 300 283200 250 195150 200 159 ` 137 ` 150 106 119100 100 100 96 89 100 88 50 50 0 0 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 Did not cut in Cut in 1974 Cut in both Cut in 1975 Eliminated or decreased Eliminated or decreased 1974 or 1975 but not 1975 1974 or 1975 but not 1974 advertising in both 1981 and 1982 advertising in both 1981 and 1982Source: Rosberg & American Business Press Study (B. Ryan); McGraw-Hill Research Laboratory 6
  • 7. Playing Offense1. Don’t Cut Advertising2. Don’t Cut Prices 7
  • 8. Playing Offense 1. Don’t Cut Advertising 2. Don’t Cut Prices “More Likely To Damage Profits Than Maintain Sales”* • dilutes brand’s positioning/value • squeezes bottom line • “difficult to escape downward trend” • offers new entrants a footholdSource: * Ehrenberg-Bass Institute (B. Sharp); Ananda Roy 8
  • 9. Playing Offense1. Don’t Cut Advertising2. Don’t Cut Prices3. Innovate, Innovate, Innovate 9
  • 10. Playing Offense 1. Don’t Cut Advertising 2. Don’t Cut Prices 3. Innovate, Innovate, Innovate “Categories that grow the most [during recessions] are those that show the highest level of product introduction”* 1930s 1970sSource: * Ehrenberg-Bass Institute (B. Sharp) 10
  • 11. Playing Offense 1. Don’t Cut Advertising 2. Don’t Cut Prices 3. Innovate, Innovate, Innovate “Categories that grow the most [during recessions] are those that show the highest level of product introduction”* 1930s 1970s During the 1970s, 50% of supermarket categories grew more than 15%.Source: * Ehrenberg-Bass Institute (B. Sharp) 11
  • 12. It’s Right to Play Offense Don’t Cut Advertising Don’t Cut Prices Innovate, Innovate, Innovate 12
  • 13. It’s Right to Play Offense Don’t Cut Advertising“The best approach is a version Don’t Cut Prices of business as usual.” Innovate, Innovate, Innovate 13
  • 14. But… 14
  • 15. What We Did 500-person quantitative study in 3 markets (U.S., U.K., France) Subsets of Prosumers & women (Grocery Shoppers) A real-time snapshot of Analysis of case studies and academic research the anxious consumer Shop-a-long ethnographies (supermarkets and malls) Semiotic analysis of changing codes of value 15
  • 16. This Recession Isn’t ExactlyLike Previous Ones 1929–33 1973–75 1980–82 2008 GDP -13.0% -0.5% -1.9% +1.2% S&P 500 -86.0% -48.0% -26.0% -38.0% Inflation -10.0% 11.0% 13.5% 3.8% Real disposable income has not decreased as much as in previous recessions 16
  • 17. a crisis of money
  • 18. Make No Mistake, Consumers Are Afraid 1 No Anxiety Severe Anxiety 5 72% (equal anxiety across age, gender, and HHI) 18
  • 19. And 52% Believe the Crisis Will Get Worse 1 No Anxiety Severe Anxiety 5 19
  • 20. And 52% Believe the Crisis Will Get Worse 1 No Anxiety Severe Anxiety 5 Anxiety Driven By … 1. rising unemployment 2. decreasing property values 3. lower consumer spending 20
  • 21. How Worried Are You About the Following?5 money to retireSevere Anxiety keeping up with cost of living paying my bills getting out of debt funding my kids’ educations (30- to 44-year-olds) putting food on the table putting gas in the car losing my job1 No Anxiety 21
  • 22. How Worried Are You About the Following?5 money to retireSevere Anxiety keeping up with cost of living Much Consumer Anxiety Is Future- paying my bills Focused getting out of debt funding my kids’ educations (30- to 44-year-olds) putting food on the table putting gas in the car losing my job1No Anxiety 22
  • 23. But That Future-Focused Anxiety Is Changing Their Behavior Today 23
  • 24. Changing Consumer Behavior How Are You Reducing Expenses?5Severe Anxiety staying home more (62%) putting off major purchases using coupons lowering the heat reducing travel buying more store brands (42%) searching for bargains online making meals from scratch conserving household goods driving less1No Anxiety 24
  • 25. Changing Consumer Behavior How Are You Reducing Expenses?5Severe Anxiety staying home more (62%) A “Homing” Instinct putting off major purchases 66% would rather spend time at home using coupons than go out—a 7% increase since 2007 lowering the heat 75% agreed this past holiday was more reducing travel about “family and simple pleasures” than gifts buying more store brands (42%) searching for bargains online making meals from scratch conserving household goods driving less1No Anxiety 25
  • 26. 26
  • 27. 58%less likely to go to a restaurant 58%more likely to go to Wal-Mart 27
  • 28. Active Bargain Hunting 28
  • 29. Active Bargain HuntingI am consumed with getting the best deal for aservice or product I purchase: 29
  • 30. Active Bargain HuntingI am consumed with getting the best deal for aservice or product I purchase: 70% agree 30
  • 31. Active Bargain HuntingI am consumed with getting the best deal for aservice or product I purchase: 70% agree 80% Prosumers agree; many hunting online (overstock.com, eBay) women increasing visits to garage sales, thrift stores less “impulse” buying; more time at shelf 31
  • 32. And Despite Their Anxiety, There’s StillSome Joy in the Hunt Women Prosumers Shopping makes me feel great. 42% 52% I enjoy shopping. It’s recreation. 57% 65% Shopping is more fun than other activities. 48% 65% 32
  • 33. The Satisfaction of the Hunt I looked everywhere for the perfect cashmere sweater for my husband until I found it at Bloomingdales for 50% off. You have to sort through all the crap until you find what’s really good. I checked eBay every day, waiting to find a new Kindle—and I did. 33
  • 34. The Satisfaction of the Hunt I looked everywhere for the perfect cashmere sweater for my husband until I found it at Bloomingdales n 50% off. o for ti Implica . V aluable is covered ing. . It is d f sort through all fo noth e You have istoound en awaythercrap until you R eal valu aren’t giv things find what’s really good. I checked eBay every day, waiting to find a new Kindle—and I did. 34
  • 35. Defining Value(The Hunt for a “Good Deal”) 35
  • 36. What Do You Associate with Value? lowest price more for the same price/added value multi-uses quality long-lasting great service guarantee/warranty 36
  • 37. What Do You Associate with Value? quality (135) more for the same price/added value (122) long-lasting (115) index 100 lowest price (94) great service (52) guarantee/warranty (44) multi-uses (33) 37
  • 38. What Do You Associate with Value? quality (135) more for the same price/added value (122) long-lasting (115) index 100 lowest price (94) great service (52) guarantee/warranty (44) multi-uses (33) 38
  • 39. What Do You Associate with Value? quality (135) more for the same price/added value (122) long-lasting (115) index 100 lowest price (94) Which seems obvious, but … great service (52) guarantee/warranty (44) multi-uses (33) 39
  • 40. A Surprising Trend Feb 08 Today Price is not the most important factor–getting exactly what I want is 46% 58% I buy based on quality, not price. 36% 60% 40
  • 41. A Surprising Trend Feb 08 Today Price is not the most important factor – getting exactly what I want is 46% 58% I buy based on quality, not price. 36% 60% 41
  • 42. Low-Price Skepticism It seems like stores are saying, “Please take this crap off my hands.” —Megan McArdle, Financial Analyst, The Atlantic In fact, the International Council of Shopping Centers blames “heavy discounting” as one of the primary causes of the worst holiday shopping season since 1970. 42
  • 43. Low-Price Skepticism It seems like stores are saying, “Please take this crap off my hands.” —Megan McArdle, Financial Analyst, The Atlantic 43
  • 44. So If Price (Alone) Doesn’t Signal a“Good Deal,” What Does? 44
  • 45. Beyond price, how satisfying are the following“added values” when you make a purchase? Top 2 Box Summary 67% top-notch customer service 61% freebies (gifts with purchase, etc.) 58% made by a company I trust 45% made by a company I admire 44% scarce/hard to find 38% conscientious/making a difference 45
  • 46. Rational Signals of Value premium quality low price great customer service added value/freebies 46
  • 47. Value Is Quality 47
  • 48. Rational Signals of Value premium quality low price great customer service added value/freebies Digging Deeper… 48
  • 49. How satisfying are the following “addedvalues” when you make a purchase? Top 2 Box Summary 67% top-notch customer service 61% freebies (gifts with purchase, etc.) 58% made by a company I trust 68% Prosumers 45% made by a company I admire 44% scarce/hard to find 38% conscientious/making a difference 49
  • 50. The companies I admire today are … (49%) honest/trustworthy (29%) friendly/approachable ethical efficient (< 20%) competitive Environmentally conscious community-minded innovative (< 10%) creative visionary (4%) frugal 50
  • 51. The Enormous Value of TRUSTin a Time of Anxiety 51
  • 52. The Enormous Value of TRUSTin a Time of AnxietyWe’ve been betrayed by the institutions we trusted the most a palpable need to be “taken care of” by trustworthy, decent brands 52
  • 53. The Enormous Value of Trustin a Time of Anxiety I want companies to show a more human face. 82% quality products at affordable prices fair compensation to its employees great customer service providing employees a good work/life balance products that are safe and reliable doing all it can to protect the environment giving back to the community letting employees share profits 53
  • 54. So What Does All This Mean? 54
  • 55. The Emerging Picturea consumer very worried about the futurehunting for value today(and sometimes even enjoying it)she’s not persuaded by pricebut looking for “human” companies she knows she can trustto deliver quality goods and an “honest” experience 55
  • 56. Value Isn’t a MessageValue Is an Experience 56
  • 57. The “Value Experience” Satisfies … need for discovery need for trust “Look What I Found!” “This is really good.” 57
  • 58. The Value Experience HUNTING GATHERING need for discovery need for trust 58
  • 59. The Value Experience HUNTING GATHERING need for discovery Value Experience need for trust The 59
  • 60. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER 60
  • 61. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER a time for new news—not just new products, but new stories and associations 61
  • 62. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER a time for new news—not just new products, but new stories and associations 62
  • 63. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER make the most of the Internet—empower consumers (esp. Prosumers) to evangelize your brand in the digital world 63
  • 64. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER make the most of the Internet—empower consumers (esp. Prosumers) to evangelize your brand in the digital world All ProsumersThe Internet is a very important part of my 78% 90%“shopping”—even if I don’t make purchases online.I’d like to be part of an online community to share 60% 87%opinions and information about brands. 64
  • 65. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER make the most of the Internet—empower consumers (esp. Prosumers) to evangelize your brand in the digital world 65
  • 66. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER invent promotions that give consumers a sense of discovery or require a little effort (contests, tell-a-friends, etc.) 66
  • 67. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER invent promotions that give consumers a sense of discovery or require a little effort (contests, tell-a-friends, etc.) 67
  • 68. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER invent promotions that give consumers a sense of discovery or require a little effort (contests, tell-a-friends, etc.) Consider online promotions that reward consumers for their effort. 68
  • 69. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER invent promotions that give consumers a sense of discovery or require a little effort (contests, tell-a-friends, etc.) promos that help consumers feel like “insiders” 69
  • 70. SatisfyingTHE HUNTER new news digital discovery promos that help you hunt Let Them DISCOVER Your Value 70
  • 71. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER 71
  • 72. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER promise a better real life; avoid the untrustworthy fantasyland of aspiration 72
  • 73. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER promise a better real life; avoid the untrustworthy fantasyland of aspiration 73
  • 74. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER promise a better real life; avoid the untrustworthy fantasyland of aspiration Value Score Value Score + 40 + 15 74
  • 75. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER promise a better real life; avoid the untrustworthy fantasyland of aspiration even traditionally “aspirational” brands must get real 75
  • 76. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER celebrate time-tested values; be nostalgic without being old-fashioned 76
  • 77. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER celebrate time-tested values; be nostalgic without being old-fashioned 77
  • 78. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER celebrate time-tested values; be nostalgic without being old-fashioned A Puritan Revival good clean family fun 78
  • 79. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER demonstrate a commitment to all; be a brand for the interdependent “us” 79
  • 80. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER demonstrate a commitment to all; be a brand for the interdependent “us” 80
  • 81. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER demonstrate a commitment to all; be a brand for the interdependent “us” 81
  • 82. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER demonstrate a commitment to all; be a brand for the interdependent “us” 82
  • 83. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER demonstrate a commitment to all; be a brand for the interdependent “us” 83
  • 84. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER demonstrate a commitment to all; be a brand for the interdependent “us” 84
  • 85. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER embrace corporate transparency; admit to your objectives; don’t pretend you’re not hurting as well 85
  • 86. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER embrace corporate transparency; admit to your objectives; don’t pretend you’re not hurting as well 1932 GM Advertisement: “There is nothing altruistic about GM research. We expect it to broaden our goodwill. We expect it to help us sell more automobiles.” 86
  • 87. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER embrace corporate transparency; admit to your objectives; don’t pretend you’re not hurting as well 1932 GM Advertisement: ur ht of o ugresearch.’tWe ed aluyit to broaden l “There is nothing altruistic abouto h ne expect ? A our goodwill. We expect Tit toGMey dsellnmore ey b d help us i es th automobiles.” h um ers t s the on d cons much a e tol or as if w — W hat roducts p 87
  • 88. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER embrace corporate transparency; admit to your objectives; don’t pretend you’re not hurting as well 1932 GM Advertisement: “There is nothing altruistic about GM research. We expect it to broaden our goodwill. We expect it to help us sell more automobiles.” 88
  • 89. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER customer service! it’s never mattered more! 89
  • 90. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER customer service! it’s never mattered more! Beyond price, how satisfying are the following “added values” when you make a purchase? Top 2 Box Summary 67% top-notch customer service top-notch customer service 61% freebies (gifts with purchase, etc.) 58% made by a company I trust 45% made by a company I admire 44% scarce/hard to find 38% conscientious/making a difference 90
  • 91. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER customer service! it’s never mattered more! 91
  • 92. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER customer service! it’s never mattered more! Shipping and return shipping are free; most repeat customers get upgrades to free overnight or second-day delivery. 92
  • 93. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER customer service! it’s never mattered more! Beyond price, how satisfying are the following “added values” when you make a purchase? Top 2 Box Summary 67% top-notch customer service top-notch customer service 61% freebies (gifts with purchase, etc.) 58% made by a company I trust 45% made by a company I admire 44% scarce/hard to find 38% conscientious/making a difference 93
  • 94. SatisfyingTHE GATHERER promise a better real life; avoid the untrustworthy fantasyland of aspiration celebrate time-tested values; be nostalgic without being old-fashioned demonstrate a commitment to all; be a brand for the interdependent “us” embrace corporate transparency; admit to your objectives; don’t pretend you’re not hurting as well customer service! it’s never mattered more Build a Genuine BOND OF TRUST 94
  • 95. The Gold Standard HUNTING GATHERING need for discovery need for trust 95
  • 96. Moved Away from Explicit Price Messagepursued new partnerships: Apple real family lifenew emphasis: food political involvement/ community activisma variety of tones: fun, for all: America’s storeeco-consciousrevamped website with indispensable greeterscommunity feature 96
  • 97. Communicating Value:A Semiotic Analysis 97
  • 98. Semiotics Trajectory RESIDUAL DOMINANT EMERGENT 98
  • 99. Semiotics Trajectory RESIDUAL DOMINANT EMERGENT 99
  • 100. RESIDUAL PRICE! quantity necessity generic 100
  • 101. RESIDUALMore Bang for Your Buck Quantity Necessity Generic 101
  • 102. RESIDUAL DOMINANT EMERGENTMore Bang for right price > right product Your Buck more is always better quantity (“Depression Mentality”) necessity “brands” scream: sunbursts! generic low prices: a democratic right 102
  • 103. RESIDUAL DOMINANTMore Bang for Better Bang for Your Buck Your Buck quantity quality necessity “masstige” generic smart/savvy 103
  • 104. RESIDUAL DOMINANTBetter Bang for Your Buck quality “masstige” smart/savvy 104
  • 105. DOMINANTBetter Bang for Your Buck quality “masstige” smart/savvy 105
  • 106. DOMINANTBetter Bang for Your Buck quality “masstige” smart/savvy 106
  • 107. imitate premium codes (style > price) 107
  • 108. (celebrity-endorsed) quality for less 108
  • 109. appeal to “trendy” values (value/values) 109
  • 110. a smart choice, not a cheap choice 110
  • 111. DOMINANTBetter Bang for Your Buck premium codes quality popular values “masstige” smart/savvy smart/savvy 111
  • 112. RESIDUAL DOMINANT More Bang for Better Bang for Your Buck Your BuckYou can buy cheap things. You can maintain a great life.Generic and informational. Stylish and playful.Save because you have to. Save because you’re smart. 112
  • 113. RESIDUAL DOMINANTMore Bang for Better Bang for Your Buck Your Buck 113
  • 114. RESIDUAL DOMINANTMore Bang for Better Bang for Your Buck Your Buck A Formula for Success, but … 114
  • 115. RESIDUAL DOMINANT EMERGENT More Bang for Better Bang for Right Bang for Your Buck Your Buck Your BuckYou can buy cheap things. You can maintain a great life. Have BETTER EXPERIENCES.Generic and informational. Stylish and playful. REBOOT TRADITIONAL VALUESSave because you have to. Save because you’re smart. Save because it’s THE WISE THING TO DO 115
  • 116. RESIDUAL DOMINANT EMERGENTMore Bang for Better Bang for Right Bang for Your Buck Your Buck Your Buck consumption EXPERIENCE (explicit communication of value) (implicit communication of values) 116
  • 117. Value Values 117
  • 118. EMERGENT VALUE CODES 118 Experience Good Enough Revivalist Wisdom (vs. Consumption)• brand as resource or tool • less about getting one • voluntary simplicity, • concern with responsible for richer experience over on the big brands conscious consumerism choices, relationships, than about getting to• forgoing ownership and community • transparent brand what’s important accumulation personality, real product • can be about looking to • project a more plural,• eBay, auction culture, story, simple packaging future instead of past, inclusive, humble, well- Craigslist taking the old and • magazines celebrating adjusted outlook making it new• rent a car, not an RV; cool self-reliance, • YAWN (Young, charming hotel, not a pragmatism, DIY • Obama’s Inaugural; Ann Wealthy, and Normal); resort Hathaway, Norah Jones • Craftster, Make, Craft Obama, Bjork 118
  • 119. EXPERIENCE vs. CONSUMPTION 119• Point is that money can’t buy you love, and the best things in life are free. Or, as MasterCard prefers to put it, they are priceless.• Consumption should always be a fun adventure (e.g., shopping in new places, experimenting with new sorts of things); or an opportunity for conviviality (with family, friends, romantic interest); or an invigorating competition or challenge (auction, haggling, eBay, Craigslist).• Consumption can be a creative act, involving your imagination, generosity, sense of daring. 119
  • 120. GOOD ENOUGH vs. MORE/BETTER 120• 33% more is only better if you really need to eat that much cereal, drink that much juice. Value isn’t only about more, it’s about more of the right thing, cheaper price for the right amount, paying a fair price for something fit for purpose—instead of cheaply made, one-size- fits-all product or service.• Making more considered, responsible choices generally; this doesn’t necessarily mean choosing a value brand, but it can.• Responsible people don’t overreach, don’t greedily, instinctively go for the most/best bang for your buck…but the right bang.• Notion that austerity isn’t only/always a burden, but can be a means to becoming a better person, deciding what really matters, living lightly on the earth, not being wasteful.• RIGHT-SIZER: Paying less for something big and wasteful, trendy and pointless, is not saving money. It’s OK to spend more on something that lasts. 120
  • 121. REVIVALIST vs. NOSTALGIA• We don’t need to retreat back into old-fashioned values (moderation, doing-it-yourself, taking responsibility for choices, concern with community and family). Instead, we can reboot these values, make them our own; make them new, for now. It’s forward-looking revivalism.• We admire austerity, pluck, resourcefulness, cheerfulness in the face of hard times when we think of our ancestors, so let’s also admire it in ourselves: Value brands can encourage intergenerational, historical, American pride in value-for-money.• Instead of aping the codes of the latest, trendiest brands, value brands should reference the good old days—but without slavishly replicating the color palettes, design styles, typefaces, and so forth, of those times. Always make it new. 121
  • 122. WISDOM vs. SMART/SAVVY• “Get smart” is a pejorative, these days: By always trying to outsmart the other guy, get the most/best bang for your buck, you’ve only outsmarted yourself. Because you ended up buying things you didn’t need, aping a lifestyle you never wanted to live, paying less for things that were too expensive in the first place.• Value brands can tap into emergent Wisdom coding by avoiding “smart” messages (you-can- have-it-both-ways, e.g., cheap and luxurious/stylish/plentiful) and instead emphasizing “wise” messages (eating locally, buying local products is not only cheaper but better for the community/environment; spending less on the things you need and avoiding things you don’t need gives you more time and money to do the things you want).• Value brands can tap into emergent Wisdom coding by educating consumers that paying more for something that lasts, vs. buying cheap and disposable items, is not only better for your wallet in the long run but better, period. 122
  • 123. Learning from “Ethical” Brands community/movement handcrafted/under-designed quality above all else develop a personality (use humor) 123
  • 124. COMMUNICATION OPPORTUNITIESOwning an Emergent Value Space 124
  • 125. “NEW DEAL” GENERICSA populist proposition—excellence for everyone. A world in which there are no“second class citizens”—inclusive, pragmatic, and genuinely simple. The best ofwhat democracy has to offer. The “no logo movement.” 125
  • 126. GENUINE MEANINGA new hopefulness with a strong desire to focus on that which is “meaningful.”Increased appeal around participative experiences (versus things that are simplyacquired). A secular way of finding meaningfulness. New respect around publicservice i.e., teachers, nurses, cops, etc. (versus decreased respect for businessmen).Value not as the need to cut out or give up, but as an opportunity to find real meaning. 126
  • 127. ENLIGHTENED MALEThe desire for strong, confident, male leadership—a new idea of the well-adjustedmale outlook on the world that is neither aggressive nor self-conscious. 127
  • 128. NEW RESPECT A new sense of respect and decorum in which humility, and trustworthiness is valued above extravagance. Prudence, moderation, and appropriateness. Decency, civility, and respect. Emulating the Greatest Generation, while looking to the future. 128
  • 129. Media Inquiries For inquiries regarding Euro RSCG Worldwide’s studies, please contact: Lisa Gruber Global Communications Manager Euro RSCG Worldwide T +1 212.886.2018 E lisa.gruber@eurorscg.com 129 129
  • 130. For more insights from Euro RSCG research, visit www.Prosumer-report.comAnd follow us on Twitter (@Prosumer_report) 130

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