Social Learning Analytics to study Teachers' Large-scale Professional Networks (eTwinning)

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  • And this is another example from networks where expertise, information and resources flow between individuals.
  • Social Learning Analytics to study Teachers' Large-scale Professional Networks (eTwinning)

    1. 1. OST’12,
Tallinn,
Estonia July
30
2012 Social
Learning
Analytics to
study Teachers’
Large-scale
Professional Networks dr.
Riina
Vuorikari
 Tellnet
project
manager
(external
expert) European
Schoolnet
    2. 2. Who
am
I?• Riina
from
Finland• Teacher
from
my
first training
(MEd
in
Fi),
-
then hypermedia
&
web
(DEA
in
Fr), research
&
doctoral
(PhD
in
Nl)• 2000-2011
in
European
Schoolnet
as Senior
Research
Analyst
and
Project
Manager• 2012:
independent
expert
in
education
and
TEL• www.vuorikari.com
    3. 3. European
Schoolnet
(EUN)• Created in 1997, based in Brussels• Network of 30 European Ministries of Education (MoE) or national educational authorities• Promotes the use of ICTs in school• “Transforming education in Europe”
    4. 4. Presentation1.
Context • Some
current
trends;
eTwinning2.
Why
Social
Learning
Analytics
are
needed? • Mapping
w/OECD
index
on
teachers’
cooperation3.
Proof
of
concept:
3
research
questions4.
Some
announcements
    5. 5. 1.
Context:
need
for
moreprofessional
development
    6. 6. Trend
1.“
more
than
half
of
the
teachers
surveyed reported
having
wanted more
professional
development than
they
had
received.” Teaching
and
Learning
International
Survey
(Talis) OECD,
2009
    7. 7. TALIS,
OECD,
2009
    8. 8. Teachers’
co-operation (TALIS,
OECD,
2009)• Implies
teachers
working
together
in
groups
or teams
to
improve
educational
processes
and outcomes. Trend
2. – Frequency
to
undertake
activities
on
6-point scale
ranging
from
“never”
to
“weekly• A
statistical
factor
analysis
showed
that
is
was possible
to
group
activities
across
two
indices: – Exchange
and
co-ordination
for
teaching – Professional
collaboration
    9. 9. Teachers’
co-operationEXCHANGE
AND
CO-ORDINATION PROFESSIONAL for
teaching COLLABORATION• Discuss
and
decide
on
the • Teach
jointly
as
a
team
in
the selection
of
instructional
media (e.g.
textbooks,
exercise
books). same
class.• Exchange
teaching
materials
with • Take
part
in
professional colleagues. learning
activities
(e.g.
team• Attend
team
conferences
for
the supervision). age
group
I
teach. • Observe
other
teachers’• Ensure
common
standards
in classes
and
provide
feedback. evaluations
for
assessing
student • Engage
in
joint
activities progress. across
different
classes
and• Engage
in
discussion
about
the age
groups
(e.g.
projects). learning
development
of
specific students. • Discuss
and
co-ordinate homework
practice
across subjects.
    10. 10. Teachers’
co-operation (TALIS,
OECD,
2009)• Co-operation
among
staff
creates
opportunities
for – social
and
emotional
support, – exchange
of
ideas
and – practical
advice.• It
can
thus
enhance – professionalism, – feelings
of
self-efficacy
and – prevent
stress
and
“burnout”.• Different
kinds
of
collaboration
may
not
have
the same
effects!
    11. 11. Value
of
informal
learning
networks for
individualsValue
defined
through
social
capital– the
sense
of
belonging
to
the
community– the
provided
and
received
support Trend
3.– the
social
network
structureInformal
networks
offer
a
high
potentialfor
teachers
to– up-skill
in
areas
such
digital
competences,– use
of
ICT
to
support
teaching
and
learning,– communication
in
foreign
languages,– other
areas
of
personal
development
such
as
 intercultural
dialogue
and
social
competence
    12. 12. 1.
Context:
eTwinning
    13. 13. eTwinning
offers:1. Cross-border
school
projects • Using
Information
and
Communication
Technologies2. Formal
and
informal
professional
development • On-line:
distance
courses
and
online
interest
for teachers, • Off-line:
Professional
Development
Workshops, national
meetings3. Social
networking
tools
    14. 14. Breuer et al. (2009)
    15. 15. Breuer et al. (2009)
    16. 16. Breuer et al. (2009)
    17. 17. eTwinning spreads
a(positive)
virus called pedagogical innovation.
    18. 18. eTwinning
reach =number
of
eTwinners
/
number
of
teachers On
average,
2.64%
of
 European
teachers
are
eTwinners
    19. 19. 2.
Why
areSocial
Learning
Analytics needed for
eTwinning
?
    20. 20. Questions
for
eTwinning Analytics?• How
can
evidence
be
gathered
of
how
and
under
which conditions
do
teachers
gain
new
competences
in
socio- technical
network?• Do
certain
activities
support
better
teachers’
lifelong learning
goals
and
professional
development?• How
do
the
activities
undertaken
in
socio-technical networks
eventually
translate
into
actions
in
classroom (e.g.
student-oriented
and
enhanced
activities)?
    21. 21. eTwinning
Analytics• Based
on
the
idea
of
Web-analytics (e.g.
Google
Analytics)
and
Learning
Analytics• eTwinning
Analytics
focuses
on
the
collection, measurement,
analysis
and
reporting
of
data
about eTwinners
and
their
actions,


for
purposes
of
understanding
and
optimising
their
co- operation
and
the
environments
in
which
it
occurs.
    22. 22. 2.
OECD
index on
teachers’
cooperation-
mapping
with
eTwinning
    23. 23. eTwinning
Analytics“..eTwinning
Analytics
focuses
on
the
collection, measurement,
analysis
and
reporting
of
data
about eTwinners
and
their
actions..” – What
data
is
collected?
Where
it
is
collected?“..
for
purposes
of
understanding
and
optimising
their
co- operation
...” – Underlying
framework:
teachers
co-operation
(TALIS,
OECD, 2009): • Collaboration
and
coordination
activities • Professional
collaboration
activities
    24. 24. Index:
exchange
and
co-ordination
for teachingTALIS eTwinning
activities:• Discuss
and
decide
on
the • Participate
in
a
Group
to selection
of
instructional
media discuss
and
exchange (e.g.
textbooks,
exercise
books). – on
a
topic
of
interest• Exchange
teaching
materials
with colleagues. – on
pedagogical
practices• Attend
team
conferences
for
the – on
ICT
tools
and
practices age
group
I
teach. – on
teaching
materials• Ensure
common
standards
in • Comments
and
ratings
on
Kits evaluations
for
assessing
student • Posts
and
comments
on progress. Project
Cards Engage
in
discussion
about
the• learning
development
of
specific • Applications
for
Quality
Lables students.
    25. 25. Index
of
Professional
collaborationTALIS eTwinning
activities
on
the
portal• Teach
jointly
as
a
team
in
the • Take
part
in
Learning
Lab,
a
short same
class. intensive
online
event
offered
on
a• Take
part
in
professional
learning number
of
themes. activities
(e.g.
team
supervision). • Engage
in
a
cross-country
project• Observe
other
teachers’
classes using
ICT.
These
projects
can
be and
provide
feedback. either
within
or
across
disciplines• Engage
in
joint
activities
across or
age
groups. different
classes
and
age
groups (e.g.
projects).• Discuss
and
co-ordinate homework
practice
across subjects.
    26. 26. eTwinning
Analytics:
basics“....collecting
data
about
eTwinners
and
their
actions..”• Aggregated
statistics 1. number
of
items,
e.g.
total
number
of
journal
posts 2. number
of
users
engaged
in
this
action, e.g.
number
of
teachers
with
contacts• Disaggregated
by – teachers
with
projects
/
teachers
without
project,
e.g.accessing
the
Desktop – by
country• Activities – within
a
period
of
time,
e.g.
Jan
1
to
March
31 – snapshot
of
time,
e.g.
how
many
contacts
there
are
at
that
given
point
of
time
    27. 27. 3.
Some
results:3
research
questions
    28. 28. Q1:Is
there
evidence
of
eTwinners remaining engaged
with
the
action
over a
long
period
of
time, i.e.
since
its
beginning in
2005-06?
    29. 29. eTwinning
retention
rate
    30. 30. Q1: There
evidence
of
some eTwinners
(1/6)
remaining engagedwith
the
action
over
a
long
period of
time.
    31. 31. Two
groups
of
eTwinners:1.engaged
in
“professional
collaboration” 

(i.e.
run
school
collaboration
projects) 2.
the
ones
who
are
notQ2:
Do
these
two
groups
use
Socialnetworking
tools
in
the
same
way?
    32. 32. 















Personal
profilePersonal contentContacts ProjectsJournal 3 3
    33. 33. Social
networking
tools: project
vs.
no
projects
    34. 34. Social
networking
tools: project
vs.
no
projects
    35. 35. Q2: These
two
groups
do
not
use Social
networking
tools
in
the same
way.Similarities
are
only
found
in
how “contacts”
are
used.
    36. 36. Q3:
Over
a
long
period
of
time (i.e.
6
years), are
there
any
trends that
emerge inteachers’
co-operation
activities?
    37. 37. Trends
over
a
long
period
of
time
    38. 38. Q3:1.
Professional
collaboration:
eTwinners
in
their early
years
seem
to
be less
engaged
in
project
collaboration than
those
who
have been
on
the
platform
for
3
years
or
more (average
18%
vs.
30%). 2.
Social
networking:
Contacts
feature seems
to
be
well
used by
almost
half
of
the
eTwinners
(45%)
    39. 39. 4.
Some
announcements
    40. 40. Other
Tellnet
activities1.
Papers
related
to
the
use
of
Social
Network Analysic
for
eTwinning
Analytics:• Draft
deliverable:
talk
to
me
(later
on
the
site)• Breuer,
R.,
Klamma,
R.,
Cao,
Y.,
&
Vuorikari,
R.
(2009).
Social Network
Analysis
of
45,000
Schools:
A
Case
Study
of
Technology Enhanced
Learning
in
Europe.• Pham,
M.,
Cao,
Y.,
Petrushyna
Z.
&
Klamma,
R.
(2012).
Learning Analytics
in
a
Teachers
Social
Network.2.
Open
dataset?
Data
on
eTwinning
social
graph• under
discussion;
procedure
    41. 41. 3.
Teachers’
profession in
2025You
decide
how
your
future
looks
like!
    42. 42. Thank
you!riina.vuorikari@eun.org vuorikari@gmail.com

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