http://lsl.eun.orgRoger Blamire23 May 2013Webinar (Brussels)ICT audit results
2The LSL ICT audit Aims• Provide a basis for interviews with Diana Bannister,University of Wolverhampton• Benchmark your ...
3The Survey of Schools: ICT inEducation 190,000 responses, 31 countries, first since2006 Outputs• Main report, country r...
4"Reports like this help bring us a little closer toa time when such opinions and positions areinformed to a greater exten...
5Outline1. Policies, initiatives and access to ICT2. Use of ICT and professional development3. Attitudes towards ICT and i...
6Key findings: 1 - policy and accessto ICT School leaders’ role is vital and active LSL schools are generally innovative...
7Infrastructure and accessAdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEU benchmark(grade 8)Student to computer ratios2450255...
8ESSIE: Students per computer –country level
9Broadband0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%50%Advanced Schools Advanced PractitionerschoolsEU benchmark (grade 8)Broadband fast...
10Connectedness0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEU benchmark(grade 8)AdvancedSchools...
11Key findings: 2 - Use of ICT and CPD Use• Generally high use• But some LSL teachers have low access to ICT• Constraints...
12Use of ICT0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%AS teachers AP teachers EU benchmark Grade 8Use of ICT in >25% of lessons
13Teacher use of ICT equipment(ESSIE)
141:1 classes and use of mobilesby students0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%AS teachers AP teachers EUbenchmarkGrade 8AS teachers AP ...
15Innovative practices?0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%AS teachers AP teachers EU benchmarkGrade 8AS teachers AP teachers EU benc...
16Obstacles to ICT use0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsAdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractit...
17Key findings: 3 – Attitudes LSL teachers are more positive towards ICT thanaverage• Therefore inspiration and support a...
18Attitudes towards radical change0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEU benchmark(grad...
194: Making change happen
20Digitally equipped schools
21Digitally equipped schools(cont.) Type 1: Highly digitally equipped schools: relativelyhigh equipment levels, fast broa...
22ESSIE: Correlations / successconditions Students’ frequency of ICT-based activities for learning in theclassroom increa...
23Some useful links Survey of Schools: ICT in Education– EUN site: http://essie.eun.org– European Commission: main report...
24Thank youweb http://lsl.eun.orgemail lsl-info@eun.orgThe work presented in this presentation is partiallysupported by th...
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Living Schools Lab - ICT audit results - June 2013

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The ICT audit was carried out through an online questionnaire which focused on the infrastructure, ICT equipment, learning spaces, staff skills and competences, CPD strategy, level of eMaturity, and pedagogical use of ICT in and out of school for each of the Living Schools Lab schools. The audit was done in March-April 2013, based on a sub-set of questions from a recent, pan-European “Survey of Schools: ICT in Education”. Read more at: http://lsl.eun.org

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Living Schools Lab - ICT audit results - June 2013

  1. 1. http://lsl.eun.orgRoger Blamire23 May 2013Webinar (Brussels)ICT audit results
  2. 2. 2The LSL ICT audit Aims• Provide a basis for interviews with Diana Bannister,University of Wolverhampton• Benchmark your school over time against itself and others inLSL• Compare your school with national and EU means Method• Adapted from the European Survey of Schools: ICT inEducation (ESSIE)• Online for head teachers and teachers in Advanced Schoolsand Advanced Practitioner schools• Infrastructure, use / non-use, attitudes
  3. 3. 3The Survey of Schools: ICT inEducation 190,000 responses, 31 countries, first since2006 Outputs• Main report, country reports, literature review,technical report• Over 2,400 charts• Open ‘big data’ set: 190 000 responses• Benchmark indicators plus investigations ofrelationships
  4. 4. 4"Reports like this help bring us a little closer toa time when such opinions and positions areinformed to a greater extent by data and goodscience than by politics, intuition, andmarketing imperatives."Students and teachers are keen to "go digital",computer numbers have doubled since 2006and most schools are now "connected", butuse of ICT and digital skill levels are veryuneven. These skills and support for teachersto deliver them need a strong boost.Reactions
  5. 5. 5Outline1. Policies, initiatives and access to ICT2. Use of ICT and professional development3. Attitudes towards ICT and innovation4. Making change happen
  6. 6. 6Key findings: 1 - policy and accessto ICT School leaders’ role is vital and active LSL schools are generally innovative andinvolved in pilot initiatives already• Go beyond comfort zone, radical change? ICT provision varies considerably between LSLschools• Technical support is rather low• Key obstacles: insufficient laptops and tablets
  7. 7. 7Infrastructure and accessAdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEU benchmark(grade 8)Student to computer ratios2450255075100AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEUbenchmark(grade8)AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEUbenchmark(grade8)Student to IWB ratios Student to data projector41 44100272043
  8. 8. 8ESSIE: Students per computer –country level
  9. 9. 9Broadband0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%50%Advanced Schools Advanced PractitionerschoolsEU benchmark (grade 8)Broadband faster than 30mbps50%16%14%
  10. 10. 10Connectedness0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEU benchmark(grade 8)AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEU benchmark(grade 8)School has a VLE With student access outside school
  11. 11. 11Key findings: 2 - Use of ICT and CPD Use• Generally high use• But some LSL teachers have low access to ICT• Constraints of space are frequently mentioned• Some innovative practices? E.g.• 1:1 classes• Communication online with families• ICT and assessment of learning Continuous Professional Development• Online professional development is infrequent• Little use of peers outside school
  12. 12. 12Use of ICT0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%AS teachers AP teachers EU benchmark Grade 8Use of ICT in >25% of lessons
  13. 13. 13Teacher use of ICT equipment(ESSIE)
  14. 14. 141:1 classes and use of mobilesby students0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%AS teachers AP teachers EUbenchmarkGrade 8AS teachers AP teachers EUbenchmarkGrade 81:1 type class Students allowed to use mobile phone32%22%21%12%20%28%
  15. 15. 15Innovative practices?0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%AS teachers AP teachers EU benchmarkGrade 8AS teachers AP teachers EU benchmarkGrade 8Student assessment Communicating with parentsUse of ICT at least weekly39%37%13%39%29%13%
  16. 16. 16Obstacles to ICT use0%5%10%15%20%25%30%35%40%45%AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsAdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEUbenchmark(grade 8)AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEUbenchmark(grade 8)AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsPrincipals Teachers Principals TeachersInsufficient laptops/tablets Space issues
  17. 17. 17Key findings: 3 – Attitudes LSL teachers are more positive towards ICT thanaverage• Therefore inspiration and support are needed
  18. 18. 18Attitudes towards radical change0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEU benchmark(grade 8)AdvancedSchoolsAdvancedPractitionerschoolsEU benchmark(grade 8)Principals TeachersRadical changes are needed for ICT to be fully exploited78%68%83%73% 73%88%
  19. 19. 194: Making change happen
  20. 20. 20Digitally equipped schools
  21. 21. 21Digitally equipped schools(cont.) Type 1: Highly digitally equipped schools: relativelyhigh equipment levels, fast broadband andrelatively high connectedness Type 2: Partially digitally equipped schools, withlower than type 1 equipment levels, slow (less than10mbps) or no broadband, and someconnectedness Type 3: As type 2 but with no connectedness
  22. 22. 22ESSIE: Correlations / successconditions Students’ frequency of ICT-based activities for learning in theclassroom increases when:• Schools• Have specific policies to use ICT in teaching and learning• Implement concrete support measures at school level• Teachers’• Confidence is high• Opinions about ICT use for teaching and learning are positive• Levels of professional development are high• a condition for the effective and efficient use of the available infrastructure. Students’ ICT use during lessons• Still lags far behind their use of ICT out of school• Affecting their confidence in their digital competence.
  23. 23. 23Some useful links Survey of Schools: ICT in Education– EUN site: http://essie.eun.org– European Commission: main report and countryreports): https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/node/51275– Dataset (with questionnaires, codebooks, technical report)in three formats (CSV, SPSS, SAS):https://ec.europa.eu/digital-agenda/en/download-data
  24. 24. 24Thank youweb http://lsl.eun.orgemail lsl-info@eun.orgThe work presented in this presentation is partiallysupported by the European Commission’s FP7 programme– project Living Schools Lab (Grant agreement Nº 317587).The content of this presentation is the sole responsibility ofthe consortium members and it does not represent theopinion of the European Commission and the Commissionis not responsible for any use that might be made ofinformation contained herein.

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