Finding synergies between teachers professional development and eTwinning

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eTwinning: Leading 21st Century Schools. Berlin Nov 10-12 2011

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  • Even if eTwinning is not about physical mobility, some ‘on-site events’ take place (PDW, Conference), they are instrumental to the set-up, development, strengthening, uptaking of virtual communities (of eTwinners, of Ambassadors, of NSS, of partners in projects etc.). eTwinners say that they create new contact both through online channels (50%) and through face-to-face meetings (50%).
  • Finding synergies between teachers professional development and eTwinning

    1. 1. Reforming professional development (PD) through eTwinning Riina Vuorikari Central Support Service In-house expert Berlin Nov 10-12 2011 ( eTwinning: Leading 21st Century Schools)
    2. 2. Finding synergies between professional development and eTwinning Riina Vuorikari Central Support Service In-house expert Berlin Nov 10-12 2011 ( eTwinning: Leading 21st Century Schools)
    3. 4. “ Professional development is defined as activities that develop an individual’s skills , knowledge , expertise and other characteristics as a teacher. What is professional development ? This definition recognises that development can be provided in many ways, ranging from the formal to the informal . It can be made available through external expertise in the form of courses , workshops or formal qualification programmes, through collaboration between schools or teachers across schools or within the schools in which teachers work” (TALIS, 2009: 49).
    4. 5. TALIS, OECD, 2009
    5. 6. TALIS, OECD, 2009
    6. 8. Dec 2008 … beyond projects..more social networking approach Jan 2005 Dec 2005 Sept 2006 Jan 2008 Teachers Rooms, Profiles Multimodality of professional development offerings Oct 2010 European-wide professional development workshops National training, e.g. online courses eTwinning school collaboration projects Learning Events, Groups
    7. 9. Multimodality of professional development offerings Little steps at the time... Teachers Rooms, Profiles European-wide professional development workshops National training, e.g. online courses eTwinning school collaboration projects Learning Events, Groups
    8. 10. <ul><li>Up-skill in areas such digital competences </li></ul><ul><li>The use
of ICT to support teaching and learning (new methods) </li></ul><ul><li>Integrating ICTs into into subject teaching </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration with other teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Communication in foreign
languages , </li></ul><ul><li>Other areas of personal development such as
intercultural dialogue and social competence </li></ul>eTwinning is not a trigger for teachers’ professional development, but an added value!
    9. 11. eTwinning used for formal professional development <ul><li>Estonia , Hungary, Lithuania, Poland , Portugal, Slovenia and Spain </li></ul><ul><li>Vuorikari, R. (2010). eTwinning Report 2010: Teachers’ professional development: an overview of current practice. European Schoolnet. </li></ul>
    10. 12. eTwinning reach = number of eTwinners / number of teachers On average, 2.64% of European teachers are eTwinners
    11. 13. Diffusion of innovation (1)
    12. 14. Crawley et al, 2009
    13. 15. a Quality Label , a sign of recognition of eTwinning excellent activities awarded to schools. NSS award National Quality Labels to schools that successfully apply for it . European eTwinning Prizes , awarded every year to schools selected by a European evaluation board. Formal recognition through eTwinning
    14. 16. Informal recognition = the recognition that teachers receive from peers, school management, pupils and parents. Additionally, informal recognition can be related to teachers’ intrinsic motivation to participate in eTwinning and their personal development goals Informal recognition through eTwinning
    15. 17. example: Informal recognition thriving teachers
    16. 18. The next question: <ul><li>If more and more research recognises the value of informal PD, how </li></ul><ul><li>can national and local in-service training schemes best take advantage of it? </li></ul>
    17. 19. Example from eTwinning 57% yes, to some extent!
    18. 20. Example from eTwinning e.g. Spain e.g. Poland, Estonia
    19. 21. <ul><li>Maria from Spain first heard about eTwinning through a national online course that is offered in collaboration with the online teacher training department within the Ministry of Education . </li></ul><ul><li>There were more than thirty other online courses available , but the international aspect of eTwinning intrigued her. </li></ul><ul><li>The course lasted for two months and she learned to understand the pedagogical principles of eTwinning, to design an eTwinning project and to manage the variety of eTwinning tools . </li></ul><ul><li>The course was valued at four credits for her career advancement . </li></ul>Formal recognition: eTwinning course credits
    20. 22. <ul><li>Anna from Poland is currently applying for the third degree of a professional teacher promotion . </li></ul><ul><li>At this stage of her professional advancement , she needs to demonstrate to the qualification committee that, among other things, she has developed certain methods of work and ICT skills . </li></ul><ul><li>She plans to use her current eTwinning-project as a demonstration of that. </li></ul><ul><li>So even if she thinks eTwinningis fun and motivating , it’s important that she can also use the project, its planning, the process and outcomes - different materials and documents - to demonstrate her newly acquired skills . </li></ul>Formal recognition : career advancement
    21. 23. <ul><li>Kirsten from Estonia participated in an in-service training course of ten modules of face-to-face teaching (forty hours) on how to use ICT for teaching and learning processes. </li></ul><ul><li>One of the modules is on eTwinning: the other modules include among other things new technology and creativity at kindergarten level and training for head teachers. </li></ul><ul><li>After having done her own eTwinning project, she became a volunteer “mentor” for other teachers. </li></ul><ul><li>Her task is to encourage teachers in nearby schools to take part in eTwinning actions. This happens through various peer-to-peer activities (e.g., on subject bases) and sharing best practices in the pedagogical use of ICT and pedagogical school projects. </li></ul><ul><li>In Estonian teaching culture, being an innovative teacher also makes one popular among colleagues and pupils. </li></ul>Informal recognition: volunteer “mentor”
    22. 24. <ul><li>One of Anna’s colleagues in another school, an eTwinning Ambassador. She has already com pleted her career advancement programme, but still loves to participate in eTwinning . </li></ul><ul><li>She finds that thanks to eTwinning, there is more interest in her teaching job from outside the school, from parents and other teachers. </li></ul><ul><li>And thanks to the language skills she has gained through running eTwinning-projects, she also gets some new tasks in her school. </li></ul><ul><li>Recently she helped prepare a meeting with teachers from European schools who visited the municipality. </li></ul>Informal recognition: peer recognition
    23. 25. <ul><li>Support from the senior school management </li></ul><ul><li>Possible integration to local/school curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>eTwinning teams </li></ul><ul><li>a well-developed and active professional development culture in the school. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>e.g. islands of innovation (upto 15% of the teacher and/or student population) vs. school-wide implementation (involving more than 50% of the teacher and/or student population) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Who leads the initiative; teacher-led vs. school head-led ? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Level of previous innovation: is this common practice in school vs. is eTwinning the only example. Other conditions (timing, PD, peer-learning) </li></ul></ul>School conditions for good eTwinnig work
    24. 26. <ul><li>Write down an example of a practice that takes place in school: </li></ul><ul><li>that you consider teachers’ professional development through eTwinning </li></ul><ul><li>that you could consider implementing as teachers’ professional development </li></ul>Group discussion
    25. 27. <ul><li>Value defined through social capital </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the sense of belonging to the community </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the provided and received support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the social network structure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Offer a high potential for teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to up-skill in areas such digital competences , </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the use
of ICT to support teaching and learning, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>communication in foreign
languages , </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>other areas of personal development such as
intercultural dialogue and social competence </li></ul></ul>Value of informal learning networks for individuals
    26. 28. Diffusion of innovation (2)
    27. 31. Now, imagine: “viruses” spread through collaboration. This virus is a positive one, called eTwinning . Who will not get the virus?
    28. 32. Who will not get the virus? The ones who are not connected, e.g. who are not collaborating with others.
    29. 33. Diffusion of innovation within a school follows the same pattern ! Institutionalising “culture of change”
    30. 34. What is the role of Teacher Networks for professional development in Europe in 2025? Out in 2012 Q1
    31. 35. References <ul><li>Teachers’ Lifelong Learning Network (www.tellnet.eun.org) </li></ul><ul><li>Crawley, C., Gilleran, A., Scimeca, S., Vuorikari, R., & Wastiau, P. (2009). Beyond School Projects, A report on eTwinning 2008-2009. Central Support Service for eTwinning (CSS), European Schoolnet. Retrieved from http://resources.eun.org/etwinning/25/EN_eTwinning_165x230_Report.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Vuorikari, R. (2010). eTwinning Report 2010: Teachers’ professional development: an overview of current practice. European Schoolnet. Retrieved from http://desktop. etwinning .net/library/desktop/resources/5/55/955/43955/etwinning_report_teachers_professional_development_en. pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Vuorikari, R., Gilleran, A., & Scimeca, S. (2011). Growing beyond Innovators – ICT-Based School Collaboration in eTwinning. In C. D. Kloos, D. Gillet, R. M. Crespo García, F. Wild, & M. Wolpers (Eds.), Towards Ubiquitous Learning (Vol. 6964, pp. 537-542). Berlin, Heidelberg: Springer Berlin Heidelberg. http: //tellnet . eun . org/c/document_library/get_file ? p_l_id=10704 & folderId=18137 &name=DLFE-515. pdf </li></ul>

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