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Student Generated Content and Guidelines to Students
 

Student Generated Content and Guidelines to Students

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This presentation is created to share with my EDIT 2000 class at the University of Georgia. ...

This presentation is created to share with my EDIT 2000 class at the University of Georgia.
This presentation aims to provide a framework for designing and implementing student-generated content (SGC) activities using free Web 2.0 tools. I discuss the characteristics of SGC and guidelines to students when they engage with SGC activities.

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  • This presentation aims to provide a framework for designing and implementing SGC activitiesusing free Web 2.0 tools. I discuss the characteristics of SGC and guidelines to students when they engagewithSGC activities.
  • In the 1980 book, The Third Wave, futurologistAlvin Toffler coined the term "prosumer" when he predicted that the role of producers and consumers would begin to blur and merge (even though he described it in his book Future Shock from 1970).In the emergence of Web 2.0 technologies, users’ active role of creating the content has been apparent. For example, citizen journalists write their news stories in their blogs and amateur video producers upload videos to YouTube to share with millions of subscribers. Students also can be encouraged to create an educational artifact using Web 2.0 tools. Tapscott and Williams (2006) indeed pointed out students’ new role of content consumers to prosumers who create products and services that will be ultimately used by themselves.
  • In the emergence of Web 2.0 technologies, users’ active role of creating the content has been apparent. For example, citizen journalists write their news stories in their blogs and amateur video producers upload videos to YouTube to share with millions of subscribers. Students also can be encouraged to create an educational artifact using Web 2.0 tools. Tapscott and Williams (2006) indeed pointed out students’ new role of content consumers to prosumers who create products and services that will be ultimately used by themselves.
  • Self-determination Theory suggests that individual’s experience of autonomy, competence, and relatedness fosters the most volitional and high quality forms of motivation and engagement for activities, including enhanced performance, persistence, and creativity. (Ryan & Deci, 2000)
  • First, students take ownership and autonomy in the personalized construction, organization, and utilization of their new knowledge outside the boundaries of their traditional role. Students assume ownership and responsibility of making decisions along the process. There is a great deal of evidence that learning is enhanced when students take charge in decision making and generating an artifact that is initiated by student themselves (Peckman, 1996; Platz, 1994).   Second, student generated content is targeted a real world audience beyond the teacher and the student. The product can be widely disseminated and used by other students in class, at school, or even the society, and globally. For example, writing a paper in an economics class can be turned into writing for a local news paper about the local economy. Having corporeal audience emphasizes in the tangible lasting value of the products. Traditionally, student’s artifacts’ life span is short and mostly discarded after the time of assessment. Student generated content can be disseminated and continuously contributed to future students and wider audiences  (Sener, 2007).Third, student generated content requires a real world problem solving skills.  Solving ill-structured real world problems represents many paths to unidentified solution.  Working in groups will help students practice collaborative skills that students will most likely need in the real world job settings. In the real world problem solving, unexpected problems subsequently occur and students will be better prepared in negotiating and finding optimal solutions. 

Student Generated Content and Guidelines to Students Student Generated Content and Guidelines to Students Presentation Transcript

  • Student Generated Content and Guidelines to StudentsEunbae LeeEDIT2000, Spring, 2012The University of Georgia
  • OverviewBackgroundDefinitionExamplesGuidelines
  • Background: User-GeneratedContent and Web 2.0Prosumers who create products and services that will be ultimately used by themselves (Toffler, 1980)User-generated Content (Tapscott and Williams, 2006) Citizen journalists Amateur video producers
  • Background: Web 2.0
  • Background: Student-CenteredLearning Where the locus of activity and control shifts to individual responsibility for establishing learning goals and determining learning means (Hannafin et al., 1999)
  • Background: Self-DeterminationTheory (Ryan &Deci, 2000) Fosters• Autonomy • Enhanced• Competence • Volition performance• Relatedness • Motivation • Persistence • Engagement • Creativity Experience Result in of
  • DefinitionStudent-Generated Content is an educational strategy that represents a significant shift of student’s role from content consumers to content producers, and result in products of lasting value to students individually, others students, a larger community, and society (Sener, 2007; Lee & Mock, 2009).
  • Student Generated ContentOwnership and autonomyReal world audienceLasting value
  • Use of Web 2.0 Tools• The student • The video is • Students write group used uploaded to their reflection Wiki to organize YouTube and in their blogs. ideas, to write shared with • Their video and synopsis, make Clark county the refection is a list of props school students included in and and the world. their learning characters, an • People portfolio. d to plan comment on filming. the video.Wiki YouTube Blogs
  • Guideline to students #1 Focus on content learning. In order to present a good material to others, you need to first understand all about it, how it works, the pros and cons, and ins and outs of the task/ content/ material. Make sure you have a good grip of the content.
  • Guideline #2 Choose a tool with which you would have the most fun with. If you find it interesting, the chances that others will find interesting is high. Also, you will keep your motivation levels high throughout the project.
  • Guideline #3 Set a SMART (Specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-sensitive) goal E.g., I will create a commercial that is 30 seconds long, for other educators who are interested in using the Web 2.0 tool of choice. I will use a free screen capture tool Jing to demonstrate the benefits and functions of a tool with my narration. I will complete the project by Thursday, Feb. 2nd.
  • Guideline#4 Keep your audience in mind. Be sure to address what they want and need rather than what you personally find interesting.
  • Guideline#5 Make it sweet and short Chances that you will keep your audiences attention for a long time is slim . First grab their attention, make it concise and to the point, and add some wow factors,
  • Guideline#6 Stay true to the goal of the project You might get swept away when you are so focused on your way. From time to time, review the evaluation criteria and remind yourself the goal of the project.
  • References Hannifin, M. J., Land, S. M., & Oliver, K. (1999). Open learning environments. In C. M. Reigeluth (ed.). Instructional-design theories and models: A new paradigm of instructional theory. Volume II, pp.115-140. Mahwah, N.J: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Lee, E., Mock, J. (2009, June). Strategies for Designing and Supporting Student-Generated Content. Presentation at the Sloan-C International Symposium on Emerging Technology Applications for Online Learning, San Francisco, CA. Ryan, R. M. &Deci, E. L. (2000). Intrinsic and extrinsic motivations: Classic definitions and new directions. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 25, 54–67. Deci, E. L. & Ryan, R. M. (2000). The “what” and “why” of goal pursuits: Human needs and the self- determination of behavior. Psychological Inquiry, 11(4), 227-268. Sener, J. (2007). In search of student-generated content in online education. e-mentor, 4(21), Retrieved from www.e-mentor.edu.pl/eng. Peckman, S. (1996). Developing student ownership in the `real world. English Journal, 85(2), 60. Platz, D. L. (1994). Student directed planning: fostering student ownership in learning. Education, 114(3), 420-422. Tapscott, D. & Williams, A.D (2006). Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything. New York: Portfolio.