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  • 1.
  • 2. MEANINGFUL CLASSROOMS ARE COLORFUL AND INVITING
    MEETING THE NEEDS OF ALL STUDENTS
  • 3. THIRD GRADE CLASSROOM
    DIFFERENTIATE YOUR INSTRUCTION
    ADHD STUDENTS, KELVIN DOMINICK AND
    SHIRANDA
    AUDITORY DISABILITY SARAH
    21 STUDENTS MILD LEARNING DISABILITY
  • 4. ARRANGE STUDENTS TO FACILITATE LEARNING AND USE WHITEBOARDS
    USING WHITEBOARDS WILL HELP STUDENTS TO VISUALIZE LESSON MORE EFFECTIVELY
    TEACHER WILL BE ABLE TO MONITOR HOW STUDENTS ARE PROGRESSING INDIVIDUALLY
    STUDENTS WILL RESPOND MORE WILLINGLY BECAUSE OF ANONNYMITY OF WHITEBOARD RESPONSE SYSTEM
    CIRCLE CONFIGURATION MOTIVATES DISCUSSION AND FLEXIBILITY IN SEATING
  • 5.
  • 6. LEAST RESTRICTIVE ENVIRONMENT
    ACCORDING TO LAW
    FIRST CONSIDERATION SHOULD BE FOR STUDENTS TO HAVE PLACEMENT IN GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSROOM
    APPROPRIATE SUPPLEMENTARY AIDS AND SERVCES SHOULD BE AVAILABLE FOR STUDENTS USE
  • 7. MOTIVATE LEARNING IN AN INCLUSIVE LEAST RESTRICTIVE WAY
  • 8.
  • 9. INCLUSIVE EDUCATION
    REGARDLESS OF THEIR DISABILITY STUDENTS SHOULD BE EDUCATED IN AGE APPROPRIATE GENERAL EDUCATION CLASSES
    BEST FIT IS NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOL IN NATURAL PROPORTIONS
    ALL NECESSARY SUPPORTS ARE PROVIDED FOR STUDENTS AND EDUCATORS
  • 10. DEFINITION OF TERMS
    REGARDLESS OF DISABILITY : INCLUSION LOOKS DIFFERENT FOR EVERY STUDENT, BASED ON INDIVIDUAL NEEDS, STRATEGIES AND RESOURCES REQUIRED
    AGE APPROPRIATE: PLACEMENT SHOULD BE WITH STUDENTS ONE TO TWO YEARS OF CHRONOLOGICAL AGE OF STUDENT BEING INCLUDED
    NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOL: THIS REFERS TO THE SCHOOL THE CHILD WOULD ATTEND IF SHE OR HE DID NOT HAVE AN EDUCATIONAL DISABILITY
    SUPPORTS: CURRICULAR OR INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES, PEER SUPPORTS ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY
  • 11. RESOURCES ONLINE ADDINSCHOOL.COM
      Elementary School Intervention Pages:
    Your Room Set-Up and ADHD Students
    Presenting Your Lesson to ADHD Students
    Using Worksheets Giving Tests to ADHD Students
    Organizing Your ADHD Students
    Increasing Your ADHD Students' Time-On-Task
    Dealing with Impulsive Behaviors
    Improving Social Skills
    Increasing Compliance in the Classroom
    Improving Consistency of Performance
    ADD in School Home Page
     
  • 12. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICES FOR ADHD STUDENTS
    Environmental Assistance
    Provide an ADHD student an appropriate and helpful environment to encourage focus and reduce distractions. Seat him near the teacher and away from items and students that might encourage him to stray. Create a quiet classroom atmosphere by encouraging the use of "inside voices" and calming music. Remove distracting items from an ADHD student's desk, including extra pens and pencils, toys and rubber bands. Give him a fidget object, a small handheld item that can be held and squeezed but that won't make noise.
     
  • 13. INSTRUCTIONAL FOR ADHD
    Organizational Help
    Because children with ADHD lose focus easily, verbal prompts and visual reminders help them stay on task. Print a schedule for the student that stays on her desk or on the wall nearby. Help her organize her textbooks, notebooks and paperwork in a way that follows her daily schedule. Provide verbal prompts by asking questions about what she should be doing and what tools she needs to complete assignments. Suggest she make a list of the steps needed to complete a particular assignment.
  • 14. INSTRUCTIONAL HELP FOR ADHD
    Active Lessons
    Whenever possible, create lessons and activities that include movement. Go outside and have students write their skip-counting (multiplication) numbers on the sidewalk and then tell them to jump from number to number. For spelling words, have students spell aloud as they jump in the air for each letter or do one jumping jack for each letter. When learning a poem, have students walk in circles around the room as they recite their lines. Between lessons, tell students to jog in place for one minute. Ask students to stand up when reading aloud or switch from standing on one foot to the other. Include one or more energy-expending activity during recess, such as two laps around the playground or a race.
  • 15. INSTRUCTIONAL HELP FOR ADHD
    High Expectations
    Create high expectations for students with ADHD. Develop goals and plans and discuss consequences for not meeting the goals. Goals might include staying in the seat, using respectful language and not talking out of turn. Provide tangible and intangible goals. Tangible rewards include extra playtime, an opportunity to help the teacher or a reward from the treasure box. Intangible goals include smiles and positive comments. If a child does not follow the goals and plans, implement appropriate consequences that might include a timeout or removal of classroom privileges.
  • 16.
  • 17. REFERENCES
    References
    U.S. Department of Education: Teaching Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ADHD
    Help Guide: ADHD and School
  • 18. HELPING APPROACHES FOR HEARING IMPAIRED STUDENT
    STUDENT SHOULD SIT CLOSER TO TEACHER
    LOOK DIRECTLEY AT STUDENT
    SPEAK SLOWLY, NATURALLY , AND CLEARLY
    DO NOT EXAGERRATE YOUR LIP MOVEMENTS OR SHOUT
    WRITING MATERIALS SHOULD BREAK UP LONG SENTENCES
    REDUCE DIFFICULT VOCABULARY LOAD
  • 19. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY HEARING IMPAIRED
    HEARING ASSITIVE TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS HATS ARE DEVICES THAT HELP STUDENT FUNCTION BETTER IN DAY TO DAY COMMUNICATION CAN BE USED WITH OR WITHOUT HEARING AIDS OR COCHLEAR IMPLANTS
    HEARING AIDS PLUS HATS EQUAL BETTER LISTENING AND BETTER COMMUNICATION
  • 20.
  • 21. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE FORMIDLY LEARNING DISABLED
    TEACHERS CAN CHANGE CLASSROOM ROUTINES TO HELP CHILDREN WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES
    READING WRITTEN INFORMATION ALOUD
    ALLOWING EXTRA TIME ON EXAMS, TAPING LESSONS
    • USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY THAT HELP TO STIMULATE LEARNING FOR SOME STUDENDTS
    • 22. ENCOURAGE PARENT TO HAVE THEIR DECISIONS WRITTEN INTO THE IEP
    Have your decisions written into the IEP.
  • 23. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE FOR MIDLY LEARNING DISABLED STUDENT
    CHANGE CLASSROOM ROUTINES
    READ WRITTEN INFORMATION OF LESSON ALOUD
    ALLOW EXTRA TIME FOR COMPLETING ASSIGNMENTS OR EXAMS
    TAPING LESSONS
    USING COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY TO HELP STUDENTS THAT RESPOND BETTER TO TECHNOLOGY BASED LEARNING
  • 24. MEETING THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS
  • 25. INSTRUCTIONAL PRACTICE FORMIDLY LEARNING DISABLED STUDENT
    USING READING MATERIALS AT VARYING LEVELS
    USING SPELLING OR VOCABULARY LISTS AT READINESS LEVELS OF STUDENTS
    READING BUDDIES
    MEETING WITH SMALL GROUPS TO RETEACH AN IDEA OR SKILLS
    PRESENTING IDEAS THROUGH BOTH AUDITORY AND VISUAL MEANS
  • 26. DIFFERENTIATE INSTRUCTION TAKES INTO ACCOUNT THE FOLLOWING
    NOT ALL STUDENTS ARE ALIKE
    VARY IN BACKGROUND AND KNOWLEDGE AND ABILITIES
    APPROACH TEACHING AND LEARNING TO REACH STUDENTS WITH DIFFERENT ABILITIES IN SAME CLASSROOM
    MEETING EACH STUDENT WHERE HE OR SHE IS AT
  • 27. ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MIDLY LEARNING DISABLED STUDENTS
    CAN BE HIGH TECHNOLOGY LIKE CALCULATORS,WORD PROCESSORS,ALTERNATIVE KEY BOARDS,AUGMENTAIVE COMMUNICATION DEVICES OR LOW TECH LIKE NOTE TAKING CASSETTEE,WORKBOOKS, PICTURE BOARDS,TAPED INSTRUCTIONS,TALKING CLOCK
    LOW TECH / ORGANIZATION HELP FROM TEACHER OR HIGH TECH SOFTWARE TO HELP WITH ORGANIZATION
    NOTETAKING LOW TECH TEACHER PROVIDES COPY OR HIGH TECH VOICE SYNTHESIZER OR TAPE RECORRDING OF NOTES ON ASSIGNMENT
    WRITING ASSISTANCE/WORD PROCESSING APPLICATION OF ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR MILD DISABILITY ENABLE STUDENTS TO PUT IDEAS ON PAPER WITHOUT BARRIERS IMPOSED BY PAPER AND PENCIL AND ALSO ASSIST IN MECHANICS OF SPELLING, GRAMMAR AND PUNCTUATION ERRORS
  • 28. REFERENCES
    References
    U.S. Department of Education: Teaching Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: ADHD
    Help Guide: ADHD and School
    About.Com. Special Education/http://special ed.about.com/od integrational/a/inclusional.htm.
    What is inclusion? From http.//www/kidstogether.org/isor.htm
  • 29. REFERENCES
    Teaching Tips ADD/ADHD. User.cubrzn.com/kenyonck/add/teaching tips.htm/
    Effective Teaching Strategies for Midly Disabled Children www.hiceducation.org/edu proceeding/kimberly% 2 fields pdf.
    ADD/ADHD in children Ways to Help an ADHD Child/www/adhd child parents.com help for adhd children
  • 30. Resources
    Strategies, skills, support for preparing and implementing inclusion in the classroom
    What does the Research Say About Inclusive Education? Article written by Kathleen Whitbred , PHD
    Educational Games