Ceap National Convention 2008 Talk By Mgos
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
748
On Slideshare
748
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. CEAP - How do we respond to the "Signs of the Times"? (Who are we? What are we to do? How do we do it?) Msgr. Gerardo O. Santos, Ed.D.
  • 2.
    • AN ASSOCIATION WHICH UPHOLDS QUALITY CATHOLIC EDUCATION IN THE SPIRIT OF COMMUNION AND SERVICE, GUIDED BY GOSPEL VALUES AND TEACHINGS OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
    The Vision – Mission Statement
  • 3. CEAP SEEKS TO:
    • ADVOCATE FOR GOVERNMENT AND NGO SUPPORT TO SMALL MEMBER SCHOOLS ON ISSUES AFFECTING CATHOLIC EDUCATION
  • 4.
    • ENSURE EFFECTIVE AND EFFICIENT DELIVERY OF SERVICES AND PROGRAMS IN THE NATIONAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS
    CEAP SEEKS TO:
  • 5.
    • WORK TOWARDS FINANCIAL VIABILITY OF MEMBER SCHOOLS
    CEAP SEEKS TO:
  • 6.
    • FIND WAYS FOR COLLABORATIVE EFFORTS AMONG MEMBER SCHOOLS
    CEAP SEEKS TO:
  • 7.
    • INCREASE ITS VISIBILITY IN NATIONAL AND REGIONAL LEVELS WHILE MAINTAINING CREDIBILITY
    • AND
    CEAP SEEKS TO:
  • 8.
    • INTEGRITY IN PROJECTING ITS VIEWS AND POSITIONS TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC. IT WILL WORK FOR EMPOWERED AND SELF-RELIANT CEAP REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS
    CEAP SEEKS TO:
  • 9. PREAMBLE The member institutions of the Catholic Educational Association of the Philippines (CEAP) believe that:
  • 10.
    • 1. Catholic education is an effective instrument for integral evangelization;
  • 11.
    • 2. The pursuit of knowledge, wisdom and truth must be founded on Christ’s teachings, and the Gospel values;
  • 12.
    • 3. True Catholic education is committed to the integration of faith, life and culture in the context of quality and relevant education;
  • 13.
    • 4. Catholic education must give witness to its fidelity to the Church’s “preferential love for the poor” . (PCP II) ;
  • 14.
    • 5. Unity and solidarity among Catholic schools with Christ as the center can hasten the way to social transformation and integral national development.
  • 15. CEAP
    • 1. Apostolic community of learning institutions
    2. Academic organization committed to excellence 3. Business organization whose membership is committed to social responsibility
  • 16. CEAP Domains Advocacy Pastoral Life Organization Programs & Services
  • 17. Pillars of Transformative Education
    • Engaged Citizenship
    • Justice & Peace
  • 18.
    • Gender Sensitivity
    • Ecological Stewardship
  • 19.
    • Poverty Alleviation
    • Youth Empowerment
  • 20. Framework of this presentation
    • To see the world of Catholic Education in the Philippines
  • 21.
    • To reflect on Catholic Education based on the “ WORD ” – the sources of our Christian tradition
  • 22. To present implications based on the:
    • a. Organizational Renewal and
    • Re-engineering
  • 23.
    • b. Effective and Efficient as well as Relevant and Productive Research-based Programs and Services
  • 24.
    • c. Advocacy that makes CEAP a learner-friendly organization
    • in the service
    • of social transformation.
  • 25.
    • d. Pastoral Involvement in the building of the Church
  • 26. Reflections on Catholic Education
  • 27. Catholic Education is called to live a Christ- centered Paschal Mystery Spirituality
  • 28.
    • “ But we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles”
    (1Cor 1:23)
  • 29.
    • “ Yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me; insofar as I now live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God who has loved me and given himself up for me.”
    (Galatians 2:20)
  • 30. Pastoral Letter of Filipino Spirituality (2000)
    • “ ANONG URI NG LANDAS ANG LANDAS NI KRISTO? … ANG PAGPAPAKA BANAL AY ANG PATULOY NA PAKIKIPAGTAGPO SA KALOOBA N NI KRISTO, ANG PATULOY NA PAGTAHAK SA LANDAS NI KRISTO.
  • 31. SAMAKATUWID, ANG BUHAY KABANALAN (spirituality) AY BUHAY PAKIKIPAGKAPWA-KALOOBAN KAY KRISTO.”
  • 32.
    • Catholic schools share with other Christian educational institutions an integrated view of the human person grounded in the person of Jesus Christ.
    PCP II 624
  • 33. Implications:
    • Challenge to proclaim and to live the vision of Jesus – the “Kingdom Values” as it is exercised in the Roman Catholic tradition.
    IMPLICATION 1
  • 34. In our Jubilee year 2006 , CEAP presented var ious ways to un derstand it’s “Catholic” c haracter. A self - survey made by Assumpt ion Antipolo known a s the HCIYS self - survey for Catholic BED Schools. “ How Catholic Is Your School?”
  • 35.
    • Challenge to strengthen “Religion as Core of the Curriculum”. What does this mean?
    • It means to make religion as normative and constitutive in our life as learning institutions.
    IMPLICATION 2
  • 36.
    • Challenge to strengthen the “shepherding” role of our organization by addressing common leadership concerns such as: Boards of Governance and School Heads training.
    IMPLICATION 3
  • 37. Catholic Education is called to be Ecclesial and Missionary
  • 38.
    • “ If I preach the gospel, this is no reason for me to boast, for an obligation has been imposed on me and woe to me if I do not preach it!”
    • (1 Corinthians 9.16)
  • 39. “ By reason of its identity, the Catholic school is a place of ecclesial experience, which is molded in the Christian community.
  • 40. However, it should not be forgotten that the school fulfills its vocation to be a genuine experience of church only if it takes its stand within the organic pastoral work of the Christian community.” (CSTTM, 12)
  • 41.
    • Catholic educational institutions are among the most necessary and potent means of evangelization.
    PCP II 622 – 646
  • 42. Among the causes are:
    • 1. The existing trend towards competition among different Catholic schools, sometimes bordering on an unhealthy contest to have the best graduates or faculty.
    Among the causes are: Deficiencies of Catholic schools in relation to evangelization
  • 43.
    • 2. Many affluent Filipinos have a cultural fixation towards elitism in education. Because high standards of education require high financial support, Catholic schools may find it impossible to express the Christian love of preference for the poor.
    Among the causes are:
  • 44.
    • 3. There is a prevailing consumerism in our society. This consumerism offers the highest reward to courses that foster consumerist attitudes.
    Among the causes are:
  • 45.
    • Challenge to work closely with the local Church
    IMPLICATION 1
  • 46. The Diocese The Parishes The Vicariates Basic Ecclesial Communities
  • 47. “ Basic Ecclesial Communities: a New Way of Being Church in the Philippines” 3 Components of Evangelization Proclamation Inculturation Social Transformation Gabriel 116
  • 48. Nature of the BEC The “New Way of being Church in our country” today PCP II: 137-140
  • 49.
    • Challenge to activate the “creative tension” of solidarity and subsidiarity in our organization. We need to experience our unity of purpose and direction as a national association of schools.
    IMPLICATION 2
  • 50.
    • How can regions promote the interests of the CEAP on the national level? How can CEAP National serve the interests of the regions?
  • 51.
    • CEAP is only as good as its regions.
  • 52.
    • How can small schools be best served by the big schools in a region? What are the practices? Can they be replicated? How do we deal with membership dues as support for national and regional programs?
  • 53. CEAP 1 st MINDANAO SUMMIT AUGUST 1-2, 2008 UNIVERSITY OF IMMACULATE CONCEPTION DAVAO
  • 54.
    • Challenge to be a missionary association. We need to look at the countries next to us.
    • LOOK AT THE MISSIONARY OBLIGATION PLACED ON US BY JOHN PAUL THE GREAT. ASIA’ S FERTILE MISSIONARY SOIL.
  • 55. “ The Philippine nation is deserving of particular honor since from the beginning of its Christianization… all through centuries, its people have remained true to the Christian Faith…
  • 56. (they) have successfully blended and have shaped… a clear national identity that is unmistakenly Filipino and truly Christian…”
  • 57. This achievement unparalleled in history “creates an obligation and confers upon the nation a specific mission…
  • 58. not only to preserve its Christian heritage but to bear witness to the values of its Christian culture before the whole world.” (John Paul II, Address to the President and the Nation, February 17 – 22, 1981)
  • 59. Challenging the Church in the Philippines in his address to the bishops, he said,
  • 60. “ at the same time you will hear other nations, especially your neighbors in Asia, calling to you: ‘Come over and help us.’” (John Paul II, Address to the Bishops, ibid)
  • 61.  
  • 62.  
  • 63.  
  • 64.  
  • 65.  
  • 66.  
  • 67.  
  • 68. Catholic Education is Prophecy
  • 69. “ Jesus came to Nazareth where he had grown up… he stood up to read… he unrolled the scroll and found the passage where it was written:
  • 70. The Spirit of the Lord is upon me, he has anointed me to bring glad tidings to the poor. He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives and recovery of sight to the blind, to let the oppressed go free, and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.” (Luke 4.16 -19)
  • 71.
    • Prophecy is the nurturing, nourishing and promotion of a consciousness and perception alternative to the consciousness and perception of the dominant culture around us.
    • (Brueggemann, 13)
  • 72. This alternative consciousness serves to dismantle the dominant consciousness and serves to energize persons and communities by its promise of another time and situation toward which the community of faith may move. (ibid.)
  • 73.
    • CEAP is calle d to promote a re levant, yet prophetic ed ucation. It must seek to promote social transfo rmation in all its progra ms and activities.
  • 74.
    • While relevance is the name of the game these days for survival, CEAP should be able to nurture a “social conscience” that is guided by the Social Teachings of the Church.
  • 75.
    • Challenge to review our way of life - the way we do “business” in our association, in our schools.
    IMPLICATION 1
  • 76.
    • How do we survive and still make real the church’s “option for the poor” that calls us to be in solidarity with, to advocate for and to empower the poor?
    IMPLICATION 2
  • 77.
    • Challenge to engage in social transformation. This is the bottom line – this may mean a discernment that leads us to “disturbing options”.
    IMPLICATION 3
  • 78. Cardinal Rosales of Manila in his meeting with the CEAP NCR school heads spoke these words: “ More than just condemning wrong doing, is there something that could be done in terms of creating a system or climate to make cheating and fraud both difficult and unrewarding?
  • 79. Is it possible for CEAP to look beyond today and team up with the Integrated Bar of the Philippines (IBP) to prepare a PI, a People’s Initiative banning family dynasties? Family and related-group interests are some of the roots to national corruption”.
  • 80. PCP II calls us to “critical solidarity”? What is our stance in political life when values are simply violated and our students are asking us to make educative these events?
  • 81. We need to connect with socially transformative movements that are faith-impelled. What are the criteria of our involvement as a Catholic organization?
  • 82. These are the BUSINA, the EHEM Movement and the HEART network, the KAYA NATIN ITO Movement. We need to prepare for the 2010 elections with our network of NAMFREL and PPCRV.
  • 83. Things we need to focus on are: first time voters registration, audit of the automation of elections, voters’ education and cleansing of the voters’ list with COMELEC.
  • 84. “ We are called to be political but not partisan. We are called to be principled but not ideological. We are called to be clear but also civil. We are called to be engaged but not used” (USCCB – USCC) This is engaged citizenship – we are good Christians, we are good citizens.
  • 85. Catholic Education is for the Integral Development of the Person
  • 86.
    • “ O Lord, Our Lord how awesome is Your Name through all the earth! …
    • What are humans that You are mindful of them, mere mortals that You care for them? Yet You have made them little less than a god crowned them with glory
    • and honor.”
    • (Psalm 8. 2, 5-6)
  • 87.
    • “ The Catholic school sets out to be a school for the human person and of human persons. The person of each individual human being, in his or her material and spiritual needs, is at the heart of Christ’s teaching:
  • 88.
    • This is wh y the promotion of the human pe rson is the goal o f the Catholic s chool.” (CSTTHM, 9)
  • 89.
    • What is integral development? It is for excellence – it is holiness. We are in the business of “making saints” out of our students. The school is the place of excellence – academically, morally and spiritually.
  • 90.
    • This is the call to integration of life and faith. The association should be fertile ground in the living out of the “Beatitudes”.
  • 91.
    • St. Paul says:
    • “ Whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious,
  • 92.
    • if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing what you have learned and received and heard and seen in me. Then the God of peace will be with you.” (Philippians 4.8-9)
  • 93.
    • Challenge to promote the student concerns and leadership as priority programs of the organization.
    IMPLICATION 1
  • 94.
    • Facilitate more programs for youth empowerment. Review as an organization our programs- are we “youth friendly”? Do we listen to the children and the young?
  • 95.
    • Challenge to promote standards of excellence in the work of instruction, research and extension. Accreditation and ISO certification are ways to guarantee quality in our ranks.
    Certified IMPLICATION 2
  • 96. Work ing closely with DEP ED , CHED and TESDA and other age ncies is needed to ensure that we deliv er excellence in instr uction. What is our connection now w ith A TEACHER ?
  • 97. “ MAKING QUALITY HIGHER EDUCATION MORE ACCESSIBLE IN THE PHILIPPINES: SOMEONE HAS TO PAY.” What is our legislative agenda in favor of private education? A case to be considered is the paper written by Fr. Joel Tabora, SJ
  • 98.
    • Challenge to look into culture: ability to work in the ennobling of culture – an environment of excellence that challenges us not simply to settle on “PWEDE NA YAN” .
    IMPLICATION 3
  • 99.
    • A review of curriculum by our practitioners and researchers is needed in CEAP . Review of our training programs for our school leaders and managers.
  • 100.
    • Can CEAP set up these programs through an institute of continuing education connected to any of our excellent universities?
  • 101.
    • Challenge to strengthen family life. Our association should work closely with family life groups to advocate for life in all its phases and dimensions.
    IMPLICATION 4
  • 102.
    • The covenanted communities and trans-parochial communities as well as parish-based family and youth groups should make the association more conscious and committed in protecting the family from “anti life threats”.
  • 103. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP “ But I think organizations do not retire. If they fail to flourish, they simply die. And how does an organization die?
  • 104. In two ways: first, by being abandoned by those who have vowed to nurture it; and second, by what I may call, institutional sclerosis. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP
  • 105. The first possibility is far-fetched because we all love CEAP, and will never abandon it. But the possibility of institutional sclerosis demands greater vigilance from us. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP
  • 106. Organizations that have experienced stability for many years contain the seed of their relative decline and extinction. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP
  • 107. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP The greater the stability of an organization, the greater is the tendency of its component parts to harden and expand,
  • 108. squeezing out any space for swift change and dynamic innovation. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP
  • 109. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP Mutual paralysis thus sets in, and institutional arteries become clogged with bureaucratic routines,
  • 110. and with many good intentions and spectacular plans that seldom translate to reality. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP
  • 111. The best antidote to institutional sclerosis is dynamic and competent leadership, a critical but cooperative membership, and periodic self-evaluation. Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP
  • 112. I suppose we have all three, so we need not fear that CEAP will disappear in the near future.” Fr. Rolando dela Rosa, OP
  • 113. Dynamic and competent leadership, a critical but cooperative membership and periodic self-evaluation
  • 114. The cause is noble, the excitement contagious, the prospects promising.
  • 115. Fin