Virtual Environments and the Future of Collaboration

  • 424 views
Uploaded on

Ralph Schroeder's presentation to TACTiCS.

Ralph Schroeder's presentation to TACTiCS.

More in: Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
424
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
14
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Virtual Environments and the  Future of Collaboration Ralph Schroeder Oxford Internet Institute TACTiCS, April 8 2011
  • 2. Overview• Real World Applications• Why are Virtual Environments Important?• Definition of Virtual Environments and Two End‐ states• Some Findings• Different Media For Being there Together• Outlook for Technology, Society, and Collaboration• Useful Tools for Thinking about the Future• The Future of Distributed Collaboration
  • 3. Real World Applications• Business Meetings  – time and travel • Training – if difficult otherwise• Design and Visualization – Exploring spaces• Online worlds – For socializing• Education – Classes and co‐visualizations
  • 4. Why are Virtual Environments Important?• They are the most ‘extreme’ form of mediated being  there together• Technologies for ‘being there together’ are  proliferating• There are many preconceptions that mediated ‘being  there together’ is not as good as face‐to‐face• Virtual Environments can help us to understand the  future of mediated collaboration
  • 5. Definition of Shared Virtual Environments and two End‐states• Definition: presence, plus interacting, plus  Copresence  – Sensory experience of being in a place other than  the one you are physically in, and being able to  interact with it, and being there and interacting  with others• There are only two End‐States: totally  immersive video vs. computer‐generated• We can work backwards from these ‐ to less  immersive forms of being there together
  • 6. Blue‐C: the video captured immersive end‐stateCourtesy of Markus Gross, The blue-c project, ETH Zürich
  • 7. Blue‐CCourtesy of Markus Gross, The blue-c project, ETH Zürich
  • 8. CAVE‐like Systems: the computer generated end‐stateChalmers’ Tan VR-CUBE UCL’s Trimension ReaCTor
  • 9. London – Gothenburg ‘Caves’
  • 10. Doing the Rubik’s cube
  • 11. Task: The Rubik puzzle
  • 12. FtF
  • 13. Other TasksWith Anthony Steed and Dave Roberts
  • 14. Some Findings• Collaboration is as good as face‐to‐face• The more immersive, the more sense of  the being there together (other things  equal!)• Technology determines ‘leadership’• Following and not following conventions  (going through avatars, leaning, pointing)
  • 15. Activeworlds
  • 16. Onlive Traveler
  • 17. HP Halo
  • 18. More Findings• videoconferencing has been available for decades, but is not  widely used – the ‘I’m having a bad hair day’ problem – Findings about skype and grandparents and distributed  couples: realism doesn’t matter, being there together does• In online virtual worlds, some social cues are not needed,  some forms of non‐verbal communication have limited uses• online virtual worlds are enjoyable for socializing and joint  spatial activity• Avatars need consistency• Voice is a reality check• People develop a stake in their world
  • 19. Different Media for Being Together• Instant Messaging• Social Networking• Videoconferencing• Mobile Phones• Shared workspaces• All have – High‐Low Spatial Component – Self‐presentation component – Large or Small Group Interaction
  • 20. Tools for Thinking about the Future • Only Two End‐States (video versus computer‐ generated), with different affordances• Online spaces support spatial interaction, social  norms, and engaging content • There are limits to the number of others that can be  focused on• Mixed or Augmented Reality are subject to attention  limits• All mediated forms of togetherness approximate the  two end‐states
  • 21. Technology and Social Outlook• Technological problems are solvable• the technology for large 3D displays and interaction is  becoming cheap and widespread • Users adapt to modality and self‐representation • co‐visualization and co‐manipulation of spaces works well• lots of things can be done together in online worlds that can’t  be done in the real world• online sociability be can better than real world sociability • online spaces can be more imaginative and interesting than  real ones• Convergence and mixing of modalities
  • 22. Collaboration Outlook• How much face, body and space is needed?• Facial photorealism/videoconferencing versus  Spatial computer generated environment? – Not quite• Large population worlds, small groups of  faces?• How different is collaborating from  socializing?• Time, money and environmental reasons  dictate less travel
  • 23. Observing education in action through  scripting classes
  • 24. The Future of Distributed Collaboration• Face‐to‐Face interaction is not the Gold Standard• Combining the Two (and only two) End‐States with Mixed and  Augmented Realities, Sensors, Geolocation, Tagging,  Crowdsourcing…• Social networking and mobiles: ‘always on’ ‘availability’ and  ‘awareness’ • Collaboration is becoming more multi‐modal, with greater  need for managing overload, and sharing and distributing  work• The future consists of effective and enjoyable mixing and  matching of modes of being there together