Regenerative Design & Edible Landscaping

  • 8,801 views
Uploaded on

Create an abundant edible oasis! Learn more at www.appleseedpermaculture.com/blog. …

Create an abundant edible oasis! Learn more at www.appleseedpermaculture.com/blog.

Presented September 2010 in North Conway, NH and West Hartford, CT.

More in: Self Improvement
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Brilliant!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
  • Beautiful photos, delicious landscapes!
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
8,801
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7

Actions

Shares
Downloads
119
Comments
2
Likes
1

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Regenerative Design & Edible Landscaping www.appleseedpermaculture.com Ethan C. Roland, AppleSeed Permaculture LLC With Gratitude to Dave Jacke, Eric Toensmeier, and Dyami Nason-Regan. Apios Institute
  • 2. GAIA UNIVERSITY NORTHEAST www.gaianortheast.org
  • 3. 3
  • 4. Prime Directive “The only ethical decision is to take responsibility for our own existence and that of our children. Make it Now.” - Bill Mollison, Co-creator of Permaculture
  • 5. Regenerative Design & Edible Landscaping • Why? • Principles • Plants • Community
  • 6. Permaculture: meeting human needs while increasing ecosystem health
  • 7. Permaculture: Ethics 1. Earth Care 2. People Care 3. Resource Share Developed in 1980’s, over 1,000,000 people certified, active in 140+ Countries, more than 4,000 projects on the ground
  • 8. Why Regenerative Design?
  • 9. BioDevastation • Welcome to “6X”
  • 10. Climate Chaos 50 million climate change refugees by 2010 - UN
  • 11. 2004 Climate Chaos
  • 12. Hardiness Zones www.arborday.org Hardiness Zone
  • 13. Food Insecurity “...an impending crisis of soaring food prices...” - UN/FAO ISFP
  • 14. Blood Boils Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2009 • Climate has been a major driver of armed conflict in Africa • Future warming is likely to increase the number of deaths from war • Strife arises when the food supply is scarce in warm conditions • 400,000 extra deaths in African conflicts by 2030 • Human costs are likely to be staggering
  • 15. Peak Petroleum
  • 16. The Hirsch Report • World oil peaking is going to happen, and will likely be “abrupt and revolutionary”. • Oil peaking will adversely affect global economies, particularly those most dependent on oil. • Effective mitigation will be dependent on the implementation of mega-projects and mega-changes at the maximum possible rate. • Government intervention will be required, but economic upheaval is not inevitable. • Scenarios: 0, 10, 20 years before peak.
  • 17. Why Regenerative Design?
  • 18. Edible Landscaping Principles
  • 19. 3 Principles of Edible Landsaping • Interconnection • Diversity • Organic & Biological Resources
  • 20. Herbs/Flowers
  • 21. Sweet Cicely Myrrhis odorata
  • 22. Daylilly Hemerocallis spp.
  • 23. Comfrey Symphytum spp.
  • 24. Echinacea Echinacea purperea
  • 25. Anisse Hyssop Agastache foeniculum
  • 26. Perennial Vegetables
  • 27. Some (More) Common Perennial Vegetables Rhubarb Rheum x cultorum Asparagus Asparagus officinalis Nettle Urtica dioica French sorrel - Rumex acetosa
  • 28. Sea Kale (Crambe maritima)
  • 29. Multiplier Onion (Allium cepa-aggregatum) • Shallot, walking onion, chive, garlic chives
  • 30. Climbing Spinach (Hablitzia tamnoides)
  • 31. Trees
  • 32. Pawpaw (Asimina triloba)
  • 33. Juneberry (Amelanchier spp.)
  • 34. American Persimmon (Diospyros virginiana)
  • 35. Chestnut
  • 36. Pine Nut
  • 37. Vines
  • 38. Groundnut Apios americana
  • 39. Hops Humulus lupuls
  • 40. Hardy Kiwi (Actinidia arguta)
  • 41. Super-Hardy Kiwi (Actinidia kolomikta)
  • 42. Shrubs
  • 43. Nanking Cherry Prunus tomentosa
  • 44. Hazelnut (Corylus spp.)
  • 45. Hazelnut (Corylus spp.)
  • 46. Seaberry (Hippophae rhamnoides)
  • 47. Currants (Ribes spp.)
  • 48. Elderberry Sambucus canadensis
  • 49. Want to learn more about these plants? www.apiosinstitute.org Visit the Edible Forest Gardens Wiki at the Apios Institute!
  • 50. Community
  • 51. Community
  • 52. Community
  • 53. Community
  • 54. Community
  • 55. Macedonia - Cegrane Refugee Camp Andrew Jones & Geoff Lawton Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 56. Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 57. Macedonia
‐
Class+Design Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 58. Macedonia
‐
Design Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 59. Earthworks: Water Harvesting, Erosion Control Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 60. Earthworks‐
‐
Swales Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 61. Strawbales Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 62. Strawbale
Women Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 63. Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 64. Early
season
seedlings
raised
in
Cold
Frames
‐‐
Duck
and
Goose
pond
posi@oned
uphill
from
small
crop
gardens
for
 gravity
fer@ga@on
‐‐
Garden
Ponds
add
diversity
and
predator
habitat Photos: Andrew Jones
  • 65. Diverse Organic Productive Small Crops Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 66. Tomatoes First Year: 6.5 Tons of Organic Tomatoes Produced -- Solar-dried and sold to gourmet Italian Market -- Economic Sustainability Photo: Andrew Jones
  • 67. Next Steps www.appleseedpermaculture.com Apios Institute • BOOKS • Landscaping with Fruit - Lee Reich • Gaia’s Garden - Toby Hemenway • PERMACULTURE • Design Certification Courses