June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009.  Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
The six characteristics of successful scientists Emil Chuck, Ph.D. Health Professions Advisor  Term Assistant Professor of...
Success in science June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009.  Health Professions Advising, George Mason University. Responsible ...
Scientific knowledge <ul><li>Mathematics </li></ul><ul><li>Physics </li></ul><ul><li>Chemistry </li></ul><ul><li>Biology <...
Scientific competency <ul><li>Overarching Competency at the Time of Entry into Medical School </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrat...
Scientific competencies (prehealth) <ul><li>Demonstrate quantitative numeracy and facility with the language of  mathemati...
Research skills <ul><li>Understanding the current techniques used and developing creative, innovative techniques to addres...
Research skills (examples) <ul><li>An organized lab notebook </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory safety training and certificatio...
Communications skills <ul><li>Develop written skills in English to most effectively communicate knowledge and data. </li><...
Communications skills <ul><li>Media presentations (TV, website, YouTube) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watc...
Professionalism as identity June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009.  Health Professions Advising, George Mason University. The...
Professionalism <ul><li>How you perceive yourself and your goals. </li></ul><ul><li>How others perceive yourself and your ...
Management skills <ul><li>Teamwork </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing and working in an effective team </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Responsible conduct in research <ul><li>Discuss, address, and make decisions that respect ethical and legal constraints in...
Advisee self-assessment June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009.  Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
Success in science June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009.  Health Professions Advising, George Mason University. Responsible ...
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Assip 2009

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June 22, 2009, Aspiring Summer Scientist Internship Program presentation. NPA Core Competencies for high school and undergraduate biomedical researchers.

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  • Press F5 or use the tool bar to enter presentation mode in order to see the poll.
  • This presentation was given as part of the orientation for the 2009 Aspiring Summer Scientist Internship Program at George Mason University (Prince William Campus, June 22, 2009). The content is based on the work done for the National Postdoctoral Association Core Competencies Committee, in which Dr. Chuck served as a member and was the author of the “Professionalism” section. The content of this presentation is copyrighted 2009 to Dr. Emil Chuck of George Mason University with appropriate acknowledgements and rights granted under Creative Commons license.
  • How will you as future scientists become successful? The future for you as scientists will focus on your ability to develop your skills in six different areas of competence. Here is a drawing that shows these six skills and their connectedness to the scientist.
  • Scientific knowledge can be described by course curriculum, and as most of us think about it, one cannot possibly be a scientist without completing coursework towards a major in a science or engineering field. Here are some of the types of classes you’d have to take. Your math skills for example can encompass algebra, geometry, trigonometry, statistics, and calculus. These are important tools for you to understand more complex applications of mathematics, such as physics, chemistry, and biology upon which most of the biomedical sciences are based. For many of you who will pursue neuroscience, an appreciation for psychology and computer science has enhanced an individual scientist’s perspective.
  • But taking and passing a class does not mean that you really understand the material to the point where you can apply it to more cutting-edge research problems. Recently the Association of American Medical Colleges and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute issued a document in early June 2009 outlining the scientific competencies expected for those who aspire to become doctors or other health care professionals. (Read.) In other words, they want evidence of active learning and application of what is taught in the classroom, and scholarly research like the type you will be involved with here is a great example to demonstrate this competency.
  • To break down these competencies specifically, here are the eight specific competencies for those who will enter medical school. Hopefully by the time you complete your bachelor’s degree and perhaps complete higher-level degrees like a master’s or a Ph.D. in a biomedical field, you will be able to showcase these competencies regardless of whether your goal is to become a physician.
  • While learning abstract science concepts is important, you are here to begin the process of developing your research skills for biomedical careers. Specifically you may be learning how to do techniques, but often these techniques will be obsolete a decade from now. So for those of you just in high school or undergraduate, you need to pay attention to learning how the techniques you use truly address the gaps in knowledge. Furthermore, you should put all your efforts into making sure that you perform your techniques as competently as possible so that new or confirmatory findings can be appropriately evaluated.
  • Some of the key skills that you must learn are listed here. If you don’t keep your data organized in your lab notebook, you won’t be able to convey your findings easily to others. Furthermore, today you have been learning many of the essentials about operating in a laboratory so that you don’t endanger yourself or others. As time goes on, you will learn specific techniques and procedures that will help carry your research forward, including various databases and programs to validate and connect your findings to proven studies.
  • Science cannot be appreciated as innovative unless you as a discoverer can convey your findings to the community of scholars. Your experience here offers foundational opportunities to perfect your communications skills with informal lab meetings and a poster session at the end of the term. These are among the basic ways scientists present their work, and you will hopefully receive future opportunities to give presentations in these other formats, including on your lab website, or perhaps YouTube.
  • Science cannot be appreciated as innovative unless you as a discoverer can convey your findings to the community of scholars. Your experience here offers foundational opportunities to perfect your communications skills with informal lab meetings and a poster session at the end of the term. These are among the basic ways scientists present their work, and you will hopefully receive future opportunities to give presentations in these other formats, including on your lab website, or perhaps YouTube.
  • Professionalism: you’ll hear many people rail about how professionalism should be presented. The problem is that there is really no set of rules regarding professionalism for scientists. Using an argument that says “we know it when we see it,” most people discuss how there is a lack of professionalism in how people dress, the way people communicate with each other, and even how to be appropriately punctual for meetings. Rather than presenting professionalism as a to-do-list, I present this concept as a series of identities and how your professional identity affects the way you are viewed as a member of your profession. All of these identities play an important role in one’s satisfaction with a role in a research project, a career direction, or transition to new careers.
  • One’s personal identities as a member of an ethnic group, sexual identity, and even educational background affect the way a future professional feels he/she is welcomed by the profession. Thus it is important to be able to self-evaluate, to network, to seek mentors and guides, and to represent your research to society. All of these personas reflect the lens under which you see yourself and others see you.
  • Communication and professionalism skills are related to the way you as a scientist will work in interdisciplinary research teams. Being able to handle diverse perspectives and backgrounds while accomplishing research project goals is a lifetime skill that begins with your experience here. Find out what people do to make working relationships work well and fall apart. With experience and observation, you will develop your own philosophy and style of leadership as you take on more responsibilities to advance your work.
  • Also as part of these skills, all scientists must respect and convey ethical and responsible conduct in research to maintain the trustworthiness of research science. One must be engaged in discussions to consider what is appropriate ethical, responsible conduct. Recognize that research is not a license to break the law.
  • In the near future these competencies will be a philosophical training guide that will help you develop into the best possible scientists and citizens to serve society beyond undergraduate or graduate education. Ideally these are competencies that should help you throughout your life and help you succeed in any research-oriented career.
  • Assip 2009

    1. 1. June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    2. 2. The six characteristics of successful scientists Emil Chuck, Ph.D. Health Professions Advisor Term Assistant Professor of Biology AAAS Science Careers Advisor
    3. 3. Success in science June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University. Responsible conduct Management skills Professionalism Communications skills Research skills Scientific knowledge Scientist
    4. 4. Scientific knowledge <ul><li>Mathematics </li></ul><ul><li>Physics </li></ul><ul><li>Chemistry </li></ul><ul><li>Biology </li></ul><ul><li>Psychology </li></ul><ul><li>Computer Science </li></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    5. 5. Scientific competency <ul><li>Overarching Competency at the Time of Entry into Medical School </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate both knowledge of and ability to use basic principles of mathematics and statistics, physics, chemistry, biochemistry, and biology needed for the application of the sciences to human health and disease; demonstrate observational and analytical skills and the ability to apply those skills and principles to biological situations. </li></ul><ul><li>AAMC/HHMI Scientific Foundations for Future Physicians (2009) </li></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    6. 6. Scientific competencies (prehealth) <ul><li>Demonstrate quantitative numeracy and facility with the language of mathematics . </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate understanding of the process of scientific inquiry , and explain how scientific knowledge is discovered and validated . </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate knowledge of basic physical principles and their applications to the understanding of living systems. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate knowledge of basic principles of chemistry and some of their applications to the understanding of living systems. </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate knowledge of how biomolecules contribute to the structure and function of cells . </li></ul><ul><li>Apply understanding of principles of how molecular and cell assemblies, organs, and organisms develop structure and carry out function . </li></ul><ul><li>Explain how organisms sense and control their internal environment and how they respond to external change . </li></ul><ul><li>Demonstrate an understanding of how the organizing principle of evolution by natural selection explains the diversity of life on earth. </li></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    7. 7. Research skills <ul><li>Understanding the current techniques used and developing creative, innovative techniques to address hypothesis-driven investigation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify important gaps in knowledge or technology. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Designing sound experimental protocols. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Competently perform techniques to produce new or confirmatory findings. </li></ul></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    8. 8. Research skills (examples) <ul><li>An organized lab notebook </li></ul><ul><li>Laboratory safety training and certification </li></ul><ul><li>Developing proper controls for experiments </li></ul><ul><li>Biosafety cabinet and fume hood </li></ul><ul><li>Microscope (EM to laser capture) </li></ul><ul><li>Genbank or similar databases </li></ul><ul><li>SPSS (statistics programs) </li></ul><ul><li>Science Citation Index (libraries) </li></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    9. 9. Communications skills <ul><li>Develop written skills in English to most effectively communicate knowledge and data. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Abstracts and posters </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Papers (journal and non-journal) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Grants </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Career resumes </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Develop speaking and listening skills in English to most effectively communicate information to different audiences. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internal lab meetings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Poster talks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Platform/plenary talks (“whiteboard” chalk talks or Powerpoint) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advocacy (funding agencies, government, industry) </li></ul></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    10. 10. Communications skills <ul><li>Media presentations (TV, website, YouTube) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dgJTgDUpbKk </li></ul></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    11. 11. Professionalism as identity June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University. The Universe. My community and the public. My professional network/colleagues My workplace institution (administrators) My workplace colleagues, reports, supervisors My sibling/parent/spouse/companion. I am a scientist .
    12. 12. Professionalism <ul><li>How you perceive yourself and your goals. </li></ul><ul><li>How others perceive yourself and your work. </li></ul><ul><li>How society perceives your profession. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>How you dress. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How your peers misbehave. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How happy you are. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How your interests change. </li></ul></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    13. 13. Management skills <ul><li>Teamwork </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing and working in an effective team </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Developing and evaluating project goals and progress </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reliability, assessment, and problem-solving </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time, financial, and priority management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaboration </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Leadership </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mentoring, coaching, and supervising </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Motivating and inspiring others </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Administrating </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assuming leadership roles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Transitioning from leadership roles </li></ul></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    14. 14. Responsible conduct in research <ul><li>Discuss, address, and make decisions that respect ethical and legal constraints in research </li></ul><ul><li>Develop appreciation for range of accepted practices for conducting research </li></ul><ul><li>Be familiar with regulations, policies, and guidelines that govern the conduct of federally (or other) supported research </li></ul><ul><li>Acknowledge tools and resources that can be used when ethical questions or concerns arise (such as in conflict of interest or misconduct cases) </li></ul>June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    15. 15. Advisee self-assessment June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University.
    16. 16. Success in science June 22, 2009 ASSIP Copyright 2009. Health Professions Advising, George Mason University. Responsible and ethical conduct Management skills Professionalism Communications skills Research skills Scientific knowledge Scientist

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