Communication Disorders

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Communication Disorders

  1. 1. Communication Disorders http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w5hXlc_qBpA&feature=related
  2. 3. Communication Disorders <ul><li>Speech Disorders </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Articulation Disorders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Voice Disorders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fluency Disorders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Stuttering </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cluttering </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Mixed Disorders </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Language Disorders </li></ul>
  3. 4. Stuttering <ul><li>http://education381.glogster.com/Stuttering/ </li></ul>
  4. 5. Possible Causes <ul><li>Genetics </li></ul><ul><li>Auditory Processing Deficits </li></ul><ul><li>Differences in Linguistic Processing </li></ul><ul><li>Physical Trauma </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: When Liz fell down the stairs… </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Highly stressful situations </li></ul>
  5. 6. Warning Signs <ul><li>Simple whole-word and sound repetitions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: He– He– He– He said that already </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: Buh– Buh– Baby Bill is sad </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Substitutions of feared words for non-feared words </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ex: (video) Sprite v. Coke </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Avoidances of speaking situation </li></ul><ul><li>Eyes closing, jaw tremors and other bodily contortions </li></ul>
  6. 8. Affects on Students <ul><li>Fear of speaking </li></ul><ul><li>Embarrassment </li></ul><ul><li>Feelings of victimization </li></ul><ul><li>Are more likely to have reading, language, and writing difficulties </li></ul>
  7. 9. Treatments <ul><li>Speech Therapy </li></ul><ul><li>Practice! Practice! Practice! </li></ul><ul><li>Speaking in time with a metronome </li></ul><ul><li>Group therapy </li></ul><ul><li>Anti-stuttering medication </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But… not very effective and has lots of bad side effects </li></ul></ul>
  8. 10. A Teacher’s Role <ul><li>Remember! Students who stutter are people with feelings. Be patient with them. </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of how classmates are treating them, students who stutter are more likely to be bullied  </li></ul><ul><li>Re-reading passages can reduce stuttering, (adaptation) so give students a chance to read through on their own first, before asking them to read aloud. </li></ul><ul><li>Learn information to songs, or in group repetition </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t allow the focus to be just them. If they need to speak in class, have students focusing on other things at the same time. </li></ul>
  9. 11. References <ul><li>Davis, S., Howell, P., & Cooke, F. (2002, October). Sociodynamic relationships between children who stutter and their non–stuttering classmates. Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry & Allied Disciplines , 43 (7), 939-947. Retrieved October 10, 2008, from Psychology and Behavioral Sciences Collection database. </li></ul><ul><li>Werts, G., Margaret, (2007). Fundamentals of Special Education: What Every Teacher Needs to Know , 3 rd Edition </li></ul><ul><li>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuttering#Causes_of_developmental_stuttering </li></ul>

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