Social movements 11 30-13

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Social movements 11 30-13

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  3. 3.    Marx and the utter deprivation of the working class Relative Deprivation Rise and fall with Davies’s J-Curve 3
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  5. 5. Charles Tilly     Organization Mobilization Common Interests Opportunity 5
  6. 6. Protest movements are organized in many ways:  Spontaneous  Diciplined revolutionary groups  Consider the Weathermen Underground 6
  7. 7.     The acquisition of resources to make collective action possible Material goods Political support Weaponry 7
  8. 8.    What are the possible gains and losses? Common goals. (Ideology?) 8
  9. 9.     Special events History itself Chance and luck Other social movements 9
  10. 10.     Global inequality and international competition. Clash of interests between state and powerful groups. Popular uprisings. Production of a more powerful, centralized government than that which existed. 10
  11. 11. Marx again: The dialectic, or, dialectic materialism progress to efficiency and digress again The conflict between opposites Conflict as a major source of change Thus, if social change is created out of conflict, social movements would be the engine. (That’s what I think, anyway.) 11
  12. 12.   Change is inevitable. There is a constant struggle between classes such as the Proletariat and the Bourgeoisie. Change is violent and sudden from the strain of conflicting forces. This will only end when the Proletariat wins the final revolution and a true socialist state is in place. Itself a social movement. 12
  13. 13. 1. 2. 3. 4. While collective behavior is transitory (short lived) social movements are longer lasting. Mass hysteria and riots are spontaneous while social movements are purposeful and goaloriented. Social movements are structured rather than free form. Collective behavior may involve only a small number of people, while social movements involve large numbers. 13
  14. 14.      Ideology Revolutionary social movements Reform movements Resistance movements Expressive movements 14
  15. 15. An ideology is a set of beliefs and principles that serve to form the glue for revolutionary behavior. It then is a paradigm, a shared view of the world. It contains the group purpose and motivation for reform or change. That is, an ideology maintains what things “should” be, not necessarily what they are. An ideology unites people with a single cause. 15
  16. 16. Revolutionary social movements seek to replace the existing value system with something new (i.e. socialism for capitalism) You do know what the Arab Spring was all about? And Occupy Wall Street? Reform movements, on the other hand, seek changes that implement existing values more adequately. (i.e. the civil rights movement.) 16
  17. 17. Resistance movements arise to either implement change or to resist change itself. Should a government swing too far to the right or the left, a resistance movement may arise to thwart its domination of existing values. Expressive movements are less concerned with political change than with “change from within” such as the Pentecostalism and the need for “rebirth”. 17
  18. 18.     Centralized power of the state Military’s allegiance to the state is weakened A political crisis occurs (i.e. a foreign war going badly) Uprisings by a substantial portion of the public 18
  19. 19. What is going on right now? Why, of all things, a social revolution. Since the 2008 financial crisis, the European Union (EU) has been imposing what are called Austerity Measures. This means a reduction in social services to the majority of the populations in numerous countries, most specifically Greece and Spain. It does NOT mean that the wealthy contribute to resolving the crisis through financial support, but it DOES mean that the wealthy retain their wealth and status. 19
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  39. 39. See slide shows on Arab Spring and Occupy Wall Street (OWS) 39
  40. 40.     Some of the material on social movements comes from Gells and Levine, 1999. Other comes from Hughes and Kroehler, 2005. Still more from Macionis, 1995 And more from OpenStax 40

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