Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Population 2
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Population 2

238

Published on

Published in: Technology, Economy & Finance
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
238
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. 1
  • 2. The science dealing with population size, distribution, composition, and change. (Hughes and Kroehler) 2
  • 3.  By 2050 the world’s population will be over 9 billion people.  Currently it is 7 billion 3
  • 4. 4
  • 5. 5
  • 6. 6
  • 7. The potential number of children that could be born to a woman. 7
  • 8. 8
  • 9. 9
  • 10.  The ratio of total live births to total population in a specified community or area over a specified period of time.  Called “crude” because it lumps all births (regardless of race, ethnicity, classes and age categories).  The birthrate is often expressed as the number of live births per 1,000 of the population per year. Also called natality. 10
  • 11. 11
  • 12. Infant Mortality Rate: The number of deaths among infants under one year of age per 1,000 live births. (Also called the Infant Death Rate) 12
  • 13. 13
  • 14. Child Mortality Rate: Child mortality refers to the death of infants and children under the age of five. About 26,000 young children die every day, mainly from preventable causes. (Wikipedia) The under-5 mortality rate is a leading indicator of the level of child health and overall development in countries. (WHO) 14
  • 15. 15
  • 16.  The increase or decrease per 1,000 members of the population in a given year that results from people entering or leaving a society. 16
  • 17. 17
  • 18. 18
  • 19. 19
  • 20. This is the idea that the process of modernization has three (or four or five) stages to the present.  High potential growth  Transitional growth  Population stability 20
  • 21. 21
  • 22. 22
  • 23. The average number of children per woman of childbearing age for a modern population to replace itself without immigration is 2.1 23
  • 24. 24
  • 25. 25
  • 26. 26 http://www.census.gov/ipc/www/idbpyr.html
  • 27. What would the baby-boom cohort look like now? That is the large boom of babies after World War II. Draw a quick picture to get an idea. 27
  • 28. 28
  • 29. So you can see why there is some real concern about social security and Medicare. Someone explain the dilemma. 29
  • 30. 30 New Politics Institute
  • 31. So this means the same issue in front of us as before. Oh dear, what should we do? 31
  • 32.  Urban development (the end of the farm)  Urban decay (flight of commerce to the suburbs)  Gentrification (displacing the urban poor)  Environmental racism 32
  • 33. Since the 1800s there has been a marked trend of the population moving from rural areas into urban centers. 33
  • 34. 34
  • 35.  Concentric Circle Theory  Sector Theory  Multiple Nuclei Theory  Peripheral Model 35
  • 36. 36 Park, Burgess, and McKenzie 1925
  • 37. 37
  • 38. 38
  • 39. Henslin 2010 39
  • 40. 40
  • 41. As the population becomes more divided by class and wealth we begin to see a digital divide. 41
  • 42. 42
  • 43. 43
  • 44. 44
  • 45. 45 "A man who is born into a world already possessed, if he cannot get subsistence from his parents on whom he has a just demand, and if the society do not want his labour, has no claim of right to the smallest portion of food, and, in fact, has no business to be where he is. At nature’s mighty feast there is no vacant cover for him." ~T. R. Malthus, Essay on the Principle of Population (2nd ed., 1803)
  • 46. 46
  • 47. 47
  • 48. 48
  • 49. 49
  • 50.  Famine in the lesser developed nations like India and areas in Africa  Wars and, worse yet, genocides as in Nazi Germany, Rwanda, Khmer Rouge (Pol Pot), Indonesia, Darfur, and Bosnia – to name a few.  Plagues and epidemics (although low in numbers) as in AIDS, polio, the flu of WWI, and whatever is next. 50
  • 51. 51
  • 52.  Birth Control  Abortion in several countries  China “one child” policy (although in dispute as to its real effect)  Modernization as a general disincentive for having many children. (See slide graphic and text on “demographic transition”) 52
  • 53. 53
  • 54. 54
  • 55. 55
  • 56. 56
  • 57. 57
  • 58.  There is an inverse correlation between wealth and fertility  The wealthier countries of the world have the lowest population growth rates.  This runs counter to Malthus’s idea that left unchecked, a population will continue to increase. Discuss why this is. How does this relate to the demographic transition model? 58
  • 59. Karl Marx's primary disagreement with Thomas Malthus was his insistence that society was not overpopulated but that wealth needed to be equally distributed. 59 A good question is whether this remains true today. And in 2050?
  • 60. Remember that population graph? What did it look like by the year 2050? The question is: is this sustainable in any realistic fashion? If not, then who goes? Who suffers the most? Are we headed for a Malthusian trap? 60
  • 61. What happens to the developing countries if demographic transition theory is correct? Will they survive phase two? 61
  • 62. 62

×