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Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
Florence Nightingale
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Florence Nightingale

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The Life of Florence Nightingale

The Life of Florence Nightingale

Published in: Education, Health & Medicine
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  • 1. Florence Nightingale Ashlee W.
  • 2. Childhood Memories <ul><li>Florence was born May 12, 1820 at the Villa La Columbia in Florence, Italy. </li></ul><ul><li>Her parents were William Edward Shore Nightingale and Frances Smith, and her sister was Parthenope. </li></ul><ul><li>She was a very serious child, preferring to spend her time alone and collecting shells, coins and souvenirs. </li></ul><ul><li>She and her sister studied Italian, Greek, Latin, and German, grammar, history, classic literature, philosophy and mathematics. </li></ul>
  • 3. Nursing <ul><li>In 1845, Florence asked her parents if she could work at the local hospital, that was run by a family friend, for three months. Her idea was immediately rejected. </li></ul><ul><li>Florence wrote, “Mama was terrified”, Parthenope became hysterical, and her father told her sternly that she needed to forget about such nonsense. Even the Doctor who ran the hospital “threw cold water” on her idea. She also wrote, “It was if I had said I wanted to be a kitchen maid”. </li></ul><ul><li>She was very eager to become a nurse, and in 1851 she got permission to go to Kaiserwerth to train to become a nurse. </li></ul><ul><li>She studied very hard for three months and returned home with high recommendations from the hospital. </li></ul>
  • 4. Art of Nursing <ul><li>Florence wrote, “Nursing is an art, and if it is to be made an art, it requires as exclusive devotion, as hard preparation, as an painter’s or sculptor’s work; for what is having to do with canvas or cold marble compared to do with the living body- the Temple of God spirit?” </li></ul>
  • 5. Marriage <ul><li>In 1846, she was introduced by her parents to the wealthy, well respected bachelor, Richard Monckton Milnes. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1849, she turned down Richards marriage proposal. </li></ul><ul><li>She wrote in her journal, “I have an intellectual nature which requires satisfaction and that would find in him. I have a passionate nature which requires satisfaction and that would find in him… But I could not satisfy this nature by spending a life with him in making society and arranging domestic things.” </li></ul><ul><li>Her mother and sister were extremely angry with her for rejecting is marriage proposal and accused her of being insensitive, selfish and obstinate. </li></ul>
  • 6. Crimean War <ul><li>In March of 1854, the Crimean War broke out. </li></ul><ul><li>Florence offered her services to the war office on October 14, and they were accepted. </li></ul><ul><li>Florence then convinced thirty-eight nurses to go with her. </li></ul><ul><li>Her stubborn nature helped get the bandages and medicine she needed, and money to build a new and cleaner hospital. </li></ul>
  • 7. Lady with the Lamp <ul><li>The soldiers knew she was working hard to help them. She often went twenty hours with out sleep. </li></ul><ul><li>She helped them write letters home in which they wrote about the “Lady with the Lamp” or Florence. </li></ul><ul><li>She was called this because she would walk around the resting soldiers at night carrying a lamp. </li></ul>
  • 8. Final Years <ul><li>Florence returned home August of 1856. </li></ul><ul><li>She founded the Nightingale School and Home for Nurses in London. Within a few years, hospitals from all over Europe and America wanted to hire nurses from her school. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1907, she became the first woman ever to receive the “Order of Merit” and was given the Honorary Freedom of the city of London in 1909. </li></ul><ul><li>She died on South Street, Park Lane, London, on August 13, 1910 at the age of 90. </li></ul>
  • 9. Hero in our Midst <ul><li>After she died, a statue of her was erected in London. The statue was made to help people remember her hard work and dedication to others. </li></ul><ul><li>International Nurses Day is celebrated on her birthday. </li></ul>

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