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Buying Morality: Shopping and the Good Life
 

Buying Morality: Shopping and the Good Life

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CRESI’s 12th February 2009 seminar given by Dr Andrew Fagan (Human Rights Centre, University of Essex).

CRESI’s 12th February 2009 seminar given by Dr Andrew Fagan (Human Rights Centre, University of Essex).

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    Buying Morality: Shopping and the Good Life Buying Morality: Shopping and the Good Life Presentation Transcript

    • Buying Morality: Shopping & the Good Life Dr. Andrew Fagan Deputy Director Human Rights Centre University of Essex
    • Being Moral
      • How ‘moral’ are you?
      • Defining ‘being morally good’
      • Virtuous, rights-respecting, or harm-reducer?
      • Self-directed or other-directed?
      • Passive or active agent?
    • Shopping & Morality
      • Shopping & the modern life
      • What effect does shopping have upon others?
      • Shopping as a means for effecting change
      • Ethical shopping & moral-empowerment
      • Can you become a ‘better’ person through shopping?
      • Defining ethical shopping – avoiding harm & promoting well-being
    • Ethical shopping
      • Three conditions for ethical shopping: globalisation; identification & opportunity
      • Putting a price on being moral – ethical surcharge
      • Characterising goods and relations as moral and immoral
      • Utilising consumer power to morally-valuable ends
    • Ethical shopping
      • Trade and not aid
      • Empowering others through market forces
      • ‘ Fairtrade’ logo and branding
      • A direct form of action
      • Shopping as a route to a better world
      • A moral imperative for shopping ethically
    • Problems
      • Trust – labelling & validation
      • A divided morality
      • Danger of moral hypocrisy through action, rather than inaction
      • Is shopping part of the problem, rather than the solution?
      • Unintended consequences of ‘do-gooders’ deeds
      • Moral choice & coercion
    • Conclusion
      • What do you think?
      • How will you shop?