Supervision and Technology<br />“Teaching, by definition, is an activity that is observed. It is only recently, however, f...
Reasons for Observations<br />Formative Observation is used…<br />To help improve your teaching<br />To highlight trouble ...
Types of Observations<br />Self<br />Through utilizing technology (such as video camera) teachers may continually self obs...
Engage in “non-judgmental constructive feedback” (Gosling, 2002, p.5)
Mutual reflection on the part of both the observer and the teacher</li></ul>Administrator<br /><ul><li>Responsible for both:
Formative
Summative
Role of both:
Evaluator
Coach
Limited time can lead to generalized or incorrect assessments</li></li></ul><li>Using Video Cameras<br />Video cameras are...
Equipment Needed<br />Video camera (analog or digital)<br />Recording media<br />Tripod<br />Optional<br />Portable microp...
Why Should We Use Video Cameras for Observation?<br />Video cameras can be used as a form of less intrusive observations. ...
A Case For Video Cameras in Formative Assessments<br />
Video Cameras for Making Annotations in Summative Evaluations<br />				When performing a summative observation of a 					t...
Bug-in-Ear Technology<br />Novice or struggling teachers improve their teaching through the use of a small “bug” or speake...
Traditional Forms of Observation and Delayed Feedback<br />
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Supervision and Technology

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Supervision and Technology

  1. 1. Supervision and Technology<br />“Teaching, by definition, is an activity that is observed. It is only recently, however, for teachers… to be observed by people other than those being taught”<br />(McMahon et. al., 2007, p. 2)<br />
  2. 2. Reasons for Observations<br />Formative Observation is used…<br />To help improve your teaching<br />To highlight trouble areas<br />To highlight strategies that work<br />To provide extra support to teachers<br />Summative Observation is used…<br />To check that you have met the minimum expectations<br />To meet “externally imposed, uniformly applied measure, intended to judge all teachers on similar criteria to determine their worthiness, merit and competence as employees”(Glickman et. al., 2010, p.238) <br />
  3. 3. Types of Observations<br />Self<br />Through utilizing technology (such as video camera) teachers may continually self observe and reflect<br />Helpful to develop “reflection-on-action” throughout a teaching career<br />Self-reflect on what went well and what did not work<br />Use reflection to improve instruction<br />Peer<br /><ul><li>Teachers take turns observing each other in person and utilizing technology
  4. 4. Engage in “non-judgmental constructive feedback” (Gosling, 2002, p.5)
  5. 5. Mutual reflection on the part of both the observer and the teacher</li></ul>Administrator<br /><ul><li>Responsible for both:
  6. 6. Formative
  7. 7. Summative
  8. 8. Role of both:
  9. 9. Evaluator
  10. 10. Coach
  11. 11. Limited time can lead to generalized or incorrect assessments</li></li></ul><li>Using Video Cameras<br />Video cameras are inexpensive and effective tools to observe and evaluate teachers and lessons.<br />Video cameras can be used…<br />By teachers for self-reflection<br />By teachers for an absent supervisor<br />By an observing administrator who is present<br />
  12. 12. Equipment Needed<br />Video camera (analog or digital)<br />Recording media<br />Tripod<br />Optional<br />Portable microphone<br />
  13. 13. Why Should We Use Video Cameras for Observation?<br />Video cameras can be used as a form of less intrusive observations. <br />Often it is difficult for supervisors to play both the role of the mentor and evaluator.<br />Camera can be used as an “outside source” to look at a lesson and teacher objectively. <br />Efficient form of observation on a large scale.<br />“Videotaping a classroom captures the closest representative picture of actual occurrences.” (Glickman et al, 2010, p.242)<br />
  14. 14. A Case For Video Cameras in Formative Assessments<br />
  15. 15. Video Cameras for Making Annotations in Summative Evaluations<br /> When performing a summative observation of a teacher, it can be difficult to fully evaluate and to “check all the boxes”, even over multiple visits<br />PROBLEM:<br />When video cameras are utilized, they allow an administrator to record and comment during a lesson. They may then review the footage to mark a teacher fairly. <br />Solution<br /> Administrators have limited amount of time to perform summative evaluations<br />PROBLEM:<br />Teachers can set up and record their own lessons. Administrators may then view during free time and permits review of concurrent classes.<br />Solution<br />
  16. 16. Bug-in-Ear Technology<br />Novice or struggling teachers improve their teaching through the use of a small “bug” or speaker placed in the ear<br />Corrections to instruction can be made immediately through well-timed cues and dialogue<br />Supervisor can be in the room or observing via a video camera from thousands of miles away<br />
  17. 17. Traditional Forms of Observation and Delayed Feedback<br />
  18. 18. Bug-In-Ear Technology – Immediate feedback<br />
  19. 19. Skype and Bug-In-Ear Technology<br />Use of two-way communication.<br />Skype – a type of online calling with a webcam. This can be utilized by teachers and supervisors (the supervisor can be far away!). Webcam and microphone may be used for supervisor to observe and guide the teacher.<br />Supervisor can give well-timed comments, directions and praise to guide teachers.<br />
  20. 20. Example of Skype and Bug-in-Ear Guiding Dialogue<br />
  21. 21. Equipment and Training Needed<br />Equipment<br />One-way radio ear bud OR Bluetooth/wireless microphone and headset<br />Computer (Skype installed) with webcam for non present supervisor (optional)<br />Training<br /><ul><li>For teachers unfamiliar with Skype, a 30 minute introduction may be needed
  22. 22. Teachers and supervisors should agree on the type and length of feedback before a session</li></li></ul><li>Hand-Held Devices<br />School administrators can record observations on their handheld devices.<br />A diverse range of application allow for quick note-taking and recording<br />Software is compatible with several hand-held devices (such as the Blackberry and iPhone)<br />Reports can be uploaded onto the internet for quick transfer of information <br />
  23. 23. iPad for Walkthroughs<br />iPad has several tools useful for walkthroughs<br />Newly createdTeacher Observation Appincludes synchronization, scheduling, customizable rubrics, and reporting<br />Can be used for diversified functions such as:<br /> Note taking<br />Diagrams and drawings<br />Photographs and recording<br />All data is stored digitally and can be transferred to a computer<br />
  24. 24. References<br />Bruce, B. C., & Reynolds, A. (2009). Technology in Docklands education: using scenarios as guides for teaching and research. Educational Studies (03055698), 35(5), 561-574. doi:10.1080/03055690902880216.<br />Giebelhaus, C. R. (1994). The bug-in-the-ear device: an alternative student teaching supervision strategy. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.<br />Gosling, D. (2002) Models of peer-observation of teaching. Learning and Teaching Support Network, Generic Centre. Retrieved From: www.heacademy.ac.uk/resources<br />Glickman, C., Gordon, S. & Ross -Gordon, J. (2010). Supervision and instructional leadership: A developmental approach (8th Edition). Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.<br />Hamid, B., & Azman, H. (1992). Adapting the six category intervention analysis to promote facilitative type supervisory feedback in teaching practice. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.<br />Jarvis, D. K. (1973). Videotape recording as a supplement to in-person supervision. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.<br />McMahon, T., Barrett, T., & O'Neill, G. (2007). Using observation of teaching to improve quality: finding your way through the muddle of competing conceptions, confusion of practice and mutually exclusive intentions. Teaching in Higher Education, 12(4), 499-511. doi:10.1080/13562510701415607<br />Paese, P. C., & Hodge, G. (1990). The use of systematic observation by a public school supervisor: does it make a difference?. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.<br />Rock, M. L., Gregg, M., Howard, P. W., Ploessl, D. M., Maughn, S., Gable, R. A., & Zigmond, N. P. (2009). See me, hear me, coach me. Journal of Staff Development, 30(3), 24-26,. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.<br />Thomson, W. (1992). Using videotape as a supplement to traditional student teacher supervision. Retrieved from EBSCOhost.<br />

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