Becoming Abstract

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Microteaching for the course in Leeds July 2013 by Sonia Arnedo, Rodrigo Hernández, Aitziber Rubio y Pilar Toro.

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Becoming Abstract

  1. 1. becoming abstractLeeds, July 2013 Sonia Arnedo, Rodrigo Hernández , Aitziber Rubio, Pilar Toro
  2. 2. STAGE 1.- INTRODUCTION AND REVIEW STAGE 2.- BECOMING ABSTRACT BY DRAWING STAGE 3.- INTRODUCING NEW CONCEPTS: LIFELIKE/ ABSTRACT STAGE 4.- PRESENTING THE ARTIST 4.1.- Biography 4.2.- Ancient sculpture: becoming abstract 4.3.- Landscape: becoming abstract STAGE 5.- 3D EXPERIENCE: CREATING AN ABSTRACT SCULTURE
  3. 3. STAGE 1. INTRODUCTION AND REVISION AITZIBER
  4. 4. NATURAL / ARTIFICIAL
  5. 5. ORGANIC / GEOMETRIC
  6. 6. TWO-DIMENSIONAL / THREE-DIMENSIONAL
  7. 7. STAGE 2. BECOMING ABSTRACT BY DRAWING STAGE 3. INTRODUCTING NEW CONCEPTS RODRIGO
  8. 8. BECOMING ABSTRACT EXERCISE I Duration 1 minute Subject A portrait of your classmate Technique Continuous contact. Not looking at your drawing. Materials Pencil or pen on white paper.
  9. 9. Method • Put yourselves in pairs and turn to face one another. • Place a piece of paper on the table and choose the material you most like: pencil, pen, etc. • Place the pencil on the paper. • You are going to draw a portrait of your classmate in one minute without being able to see what you are drawing. • Try to keep the pencil in contact with the paper, pull and push the pencil around. That is, you can’t lift the pencil from the paper once you have started the drawing. Not looking at your drawing is necessary to achieve the purpose of the activity. To focus your entire attention on the visual information (the face of your model: classmate) To remove all attention from the drawing. If you see what you draw, you will tend to focus on details and defeat the purpose of the exercise.
  10. 10. Lifelike shape Representing things as they are in real life, so, as they really look. Abstract shape Not representing people or things in a realistic way.
  11. 11. Las Meninas by Diego Velázquez Guernica by Pablo Picasso Composition VIII by W. Kandinsky White on White by Kazimir Malevich
  12. 12. STRUCTURES: My picture is more __________ than yours. My picture is less ____________ than yours.
  13. 13. Las Meninas by Diego Velázquez Guernica by Pablo Picasso Composition VIII by W. Kandinsky White on White by Kazimir Malevich I prefer the __________ picture because …..
  14. 14. STAGE 4. PRESENTING THE ARTIST • 4.1 Biography • 4.2 Ancient Culture: becoming abstract • 4.3Landscape: becoming abstract (4.1-4.2) SONIA / (4.3) AITZIBER
  15. 15. THE SCULPTOR HENRY MOORE ‘I think in shapes not words‘
  16. 16. Henry Spencer Moore was born in Castleford, Yorkshire, England in 1898.
  17. 17. Henry Moore decided he wanted to become a sculptor at the age of eleven.
  18. 18. CARVING: is one of the sculptural techniques. Is a sculpture created by removing materials (as wood or stone) in order to create a desired shape. The sculptor removes material using chisels and other tools. Chisel CLAY: is a natural earthy material that is plastic when wet, used for making bricks, pottery, etc
  19. 19. With eighteen years old served to his king and country as a soldier in the cold war for two years. He back home more mature and ready for what to do with his life.
  20. 20. He studied sculpture at Leeds, and became the teacher of his first school, moved to London and teaching there too and then he decided to spend some time abroad. He went to lots of places in Italy. The 1920s was a period of research and exploration for Moore.
  21. 21. But his work was different and not everybody understood it.
  22. 22. And he continuous travelling and meeting other artists as Picasso, Giacometti, Arc, Greco's works in Toledo, Spain.
  23. 23. He became a well known artist because of the shelters drawings during World War II
  24. 24. In 1943 Canon Walter Hussey, an Anglican Clergyman asked Moore for a Madonna and Child for his church. The theme of mother and child went back when his daughter born is 1946
  25. 25. In 1946 Moore had made his first visit to New York
  26. 26. Moore received increasingly prestigious commissions abroad. At the same time, demands for exhibitions of his work continued to increase, both in number and in scale. By the end of the seventies the number of exhibitions were about forty a year. EVERY BODY WANTS A HENRY MOORE!
  27. 27. Henry Moore died on 31st August 1986. He was 88. Moore’s career spanned over fifty years . That’s a lot of sculptures!
  28. 28. ANCIENT ART – HENRY MOORE
  29. 29. King and Queen King and Queen, 1952-1953, Bronze Egyptian effigy of a married couple Demeter and Persephone in a Wagon
  30. 30. Draped Reclining Figures In the early 1950s, Moore went to Greece and was influenced by ancient Greek and Roman sculpture but his figures are bigger. Draped Reclining Figure, 1952-53. Bronze. Ancient Greek Sculpture Draped Seated Woman 1957 Diane und Aphrodite, east pediment of the Parthenon
  31. 31. Timeless Figures Figure A This simplified, stylized stone sculpture of the ancient Mexican figure known as a Chacmool (chock-MOOL), gave Moore the idea for his reclining figure. Figure B Reclining Woman 1929, Brown stone Figure A Chacmoo. 9th-13th Century , Mexico Figure B Moore created his first relining figures during the 1920s. Carved out of stone, the figure is realistic but highly simplified. It has the strong, solid shape and rough texture of the ancient Mexican sculptures that Moore admired.
  32. 32. Reclining Figures Henry Moore’s sculpture is always based on the human figure; most are a reclining female. His figures are partly inspired from his youth when he rubbed his reclining mother’s back while she was suffering from arthritis.
  33. 33. GUIDELINES: THEMES: RECLININIG FIGURES MOTHER AND CHILD FAMILY GROUPS THE SHELTER DRAWINGS INFLUENCES: 1)HISTORICAL EVENTS: • First World War • Spanish Civil War • The Cold War • The second World War 2) ANCIENT ART( Archaic Greek, African Art, Oceanic Art and Mexican Art) 3) LANDSCAPES:
  34. 34. Landscape: becoming abstract
  35. 35. Moore’s sculpture and the landscape Moors Hills
  36. 36. Moore’s sculpture and the landscape Caverns Rock Arch
  37. 37. Moore’s sculpture and the landscape Tree trunk Cliffs
  38. 38. STAGE 5. 3D EXPERIENCE: CREATING AN ABSTRACT SCULPTURE PILAR
  39. 39. CARVING Chisel CLAY
  40. 40. Modelling Is a type of additive sculpture in which material is added and/or shaped to create a form.
  41. 41. Casting Uses liquid materials such as plaster poured in a cast which then hardens to create a new solid form
  42. 42. Assemblage Is used when combining element much like collage except that it is three-dimensional
  43. 43. A sculpture is a person who is interested in the shape of things, a poet in words, a musician by sounds. Henry Moore

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