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  • Title;Describe a project to create “learning objects” that will integrate information literacy concepts into the “One Health/One Medicine” framework.I’ll warn you that this isn’t the presentation I thought I would be giving when I submitted my abstract, in October. I misjudged the ability of a large group of faculty and staff from multiple disciplines to meet stated deadlines!
  • These were some of the suggestions that came out of the faculty meetings.
  • In the end, this is what we proposed. We didn’t want to do a tutorial, just because those go out of date so fast, so we focused on the concepts that would have a longer shelf-life.(note--lack of knowledge of ebm/ebph & PICO from people I thought would know about it! Culture shock!)
  • In the end, faculty felt access to information wasn’t one of their key goals Emphasizing interdisciplinarity and developing research techniques was. But they were still concerned about how to get students to the appropriate resources, so we proposed an information portal or LibGuide.
  • This is an example of the planning worksheet we were asked to use. You can see, we had to be pretty clear before we even developed content on our learning objectives, and were asked to use Bloom’s Taxonomy.We then took our teaching points and filled them out in a powerpoint, which the instructional technologists then filled out. This unfortunately is still pretty conceptual—they have it pretty well sketched out, but you won’t see the interactivity that’s planned. However, these will be open access, so I’ll be able to share via listservs, etc., when they’re done.One other possible change—we designed this using Avian Influenza as our scenario. And then of course H1N1 hit. We’re thinking of revising it to use swine flu instead, but aren’t sure yet.The other thing that’s happened recently, As I said, when I proposed the paper I anticipated I’d have a live learning object to show, but due to the vicissitudes of working w/ faculty, what we have is the skeleton of one.
  • So here’s some examples of content on the interdisciplinarity LO. Webmotif will be used throughout…
  • Red objective – is it necessary since we only talk briefly about the research cycle?
  • Build collage of images representing fields—veterinary, human health (nurses, hospital, village clinic), ecological (?), plus something representing social sci/cultural anthro (maybe an image of a group of people in a village). C.K. you can probably re-use some of the images from the Zoonosis LOStart with text and continue….the next few slides depict how the text and collage of images will build. I think this section should build automatically when users land on this slide and then stop when indicated….
  • The next few slides depict how the collage of images will build automatically.
  • So first I’ll give you a bit of information on how this project came to be.If you’re not familiar w/ OHOM, here’s a bit of background:I’m sure the veterinary librarians in the room can give a much better background than I can.Bascially, it promotes the concept of an interdisciplinary approach to health, encouraging collaboration and cross-education btwn animal and human health, originally promoted in 19th century by William Osler & Rudolph Virchow). It shows up intermittently in the literature over the past 100 years, but was revived recently by the AVMA as an interdisciplinary educational concept, which now includes environmental health.This recognizes the unprecedented challenges associated with emerging pathogens, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and explosive human population growth resulting in habitat loss and increased wildlife/human interactions.  About 60% of existing human pathogens, and more than 75% of those appearing over the past two decades, are zoonotic.  An interdisciplinary “One Health” would ideally involve veterinarians, physicians, biologists, public health experts, and environmental health professionals, working to collaboratively address health concerns associated with these complex issues.   It’s been endorsed byorganizations such as the Wildlife Conservation Society, and the American Medical Association.  
  • The next few slides depict how the collage of images will build automatically. Collage of images representing fields—veterinary, human health (nurses, hospital, village clinic), ecological (?), plus something representing social sci/cultural anthro (maybe an image of a group of people in a village
  • After collage/web is complete, fade to watermark and end with text overlay.
  • More about scope/impact of avian flu? If so, maybe we can add a “More about Avian Flu” button that opens a pop up. Draggable questions:Human Health: How is avian flu transmitted to humans?Vetmed: How is avian flu transmitted among domestic bird populations?Wildlife Ecologist: How do the migration patterns of wild birds relate to the spread of avian flu?Public Health: What are effective community interventions to reduce the risk of an influenza outbreak?Anthropologist: What cultural characteristics of human groups promote or retard the spread of avian flu? How do the cultural norms / characteristics affect practicality of flu prevention or outbreak containment?
  • We’re not actually so crazy about this—the whole concept is to promote interdisciplinarity, and we don’t want students to come away thinking that doctors always use quantitative methods, and anthropologists never do. So some tweaking of content is needed.
  • .”
  • Feedback on Submit:Correct: “That’s right. Biomedical researchers will collect data about the H5N1 virus during laboratory research.This type of data will then call for quantitative analysis.”Incorrect: “Sorry. Biomedical researchers will collect data about the H5N1 virus during laboratory research.This type of data will then call for quantitative analysis.”
  • This will tie in to our evaluation object. There’s a bit after here that gives pointers on how to evaluate the research methods, but there will be more in the evaluation object.
  • At the UW end of things, there is a 3-yr project, funded by the provost, to award grants for integration of technology into instruction. They’ve been averaging about 6 awards/yr.
  • 2nd LO will focus on evaluating information.
  • We’ve marked up an article (currently just a pdf) with pointers on what to look for when evaluating an article. This will be made into interactive LO.
  • This and the next sheet are your basic guide to evaluatingan article. Some of the concepts will be integrated as quizzes, but this will also be available as a handout.
  • Lots of portals libguides on campus w/ different info, but OH/OM specific was felt necessary to bridge interD divide.Another example of interesting politics—Ebling has our own web team, and have been creating our own portals for a few yrs. Campus bought LibGuide license a bit over a year ago, and has been steadily moving the subject guides that were on the GLS pages to libguides. Again, because this was such an interdisciplinary effort, we were under strong pressure to do this as a libguide, rather than as one of our Ebing-branded portals. Put together a small team—Allan Barclay, Gabe Gossett (SLIS student Sarah hired to help w/ this project). This was really helpful for the rest of the project, actually, because in pulling together the team, we had to explain to them the rest of the project, including the concept and the audience.Issues: who will be cntact. Do we create a OHOM team? Group email? Who’s in charge of keeping up to date (esp. once Gabe graduates and is gone)?Note—currently suffering from the common libguides problem of too much stuff. A lot of this will change..
  • (lots of participants, not a lot of accountability)Always good to have a SLIS student who can focus on it.Something about slippery nature of project?
  • w/o Gabe, we’d still be working on the interdisciplinarity ppt.
  • PH/HA and PSS for travel stipendsUW – madison for flexibility to take part in this project. Hard, but very educational.
  • Web/mosaic/puzzle motif will be used throughout… I’m thinking a web motif is best because it’s easier to add and subtract elements for more or less complexity.
  • Spring ‘08, school of vet med applied for a TEL grant to be used for OH/OM concepts. Among other things, the grant was meant to address the fact that many expert faculty end up presenting the same basic lectures for multiple courses in Vet Med, Global Health, Public Health, and other programs.A learning object is more than a recorded lecture & ppt. It takes content and makes it interactive, usually with quizzes or other activities mixed in. If you’re interested in seeing some completed ones, I’ve provided a link at the end.
  • Red objective – is it necessary since we only talk briefly about the research cycle?
  • Build collage of images representing fields—veterinary, human health (nurses, hospital, village clinic), ecological (?), plus something representing social sci/cultural anthro (maybe an image of a group of people in a village). C.K. you can probably re-use some of the images from the Zoonosis LOStart with text and continue….the next few slides depict how the text and collage of images will build. I think this section should build automatically when users land on this slide and then stop when indicated….
  • The next few slides depict how the collage of images will build automatically.
  • The next few slides depict how the collage of images will build automatically. Collage of images representing fields—veterinary, human health (nurses, hospital, village clinic), ecological (?), plus something representing social sci/cultural anthro (maybe an image of a group of people in a village
  • After collage/web is complete, fade to watermark and end with text overlay.
  • More about scope/impact of avian flu? If so, maybe we can add a “More about Avian Flu” button that opens a pop up. Draggable questions:Human Health: How is avian flu transmitted to humans?Vetmed: How is avian flu transmitted among domestic bird populations?Wildlife Ecologist: How do the migration patterns of wild birds relate to the spread of avian flu?Public Health: What are effective community interventions to reduce the risk of an influenza outbreak?Anthropologist: What cultural characteristics of human groups promote or retard the spread of avian flu? How do the cultural norms / characteristics affect practicality of flu prevention or outbreak containment?
  • After [Submit] text on bottom appears as feedback. Rollover for epistemology: The study of knowledge which addresses:Problematics (ways of conceiving problems); Sources of evidence; andMethods of analysis and inference. (Epistemology Definition from “Anthropology and Epidemiology: ”) I reworded this a little so I’m not sure how we would cite. I assume it needs citation, right?
  • Another part of the grant targeted UW’s digital repository, which some on campus felt was a bit...cumbersome. Because there was a proposal to revise the interface, the DCC librarian was on the grant committee, and was able to suggest info literacy and access to information as topics. I should note that the campus Info Lit coordinator was consulted at this point, and wrote a letter of support for the grant—but she wasn’t actually invited to any of the planning meetings.
  • Feedback on Submit:Correct: “That’s right. Anthropologists and sociologists use interviews and observation to create an ethnography, a picture of cultural practices. This approach would require qualitative analysis of the data.”Incorrect: “Sorry, that’s not right. Anthropologists and sociologists use interviews and observation to create an ethnography, a picture of cultural practices. This approach would require qualitative analysis of the data.”
  • Feedback on Submit:Correct: “That’s right. Both veterinary and human public health practitioners are likely to use both methods to answer these questions. For instance they would both probably have to interview practitioners that were working in the field during the outbreak and compare that qualitative data to the quantitative data about rates of infection/vaccination.”Incorrect: “Sorry, that’s incorrect. Veterinary and human public health practitioners are most likely to use both methods to answer these questions. For instance they would both probably have to interview practitioners that were working in the field during the outbreak and compare that qualitative data to the quantitative data about rates of infection/vaccination.”
  • Feedback on Submit:Correct: “That’s right. Biomedical researchers will collect data about the H5N1 virus during laboratory research.This type of data will then call for quantitative analysis.”Incorrect: “Sorry. Biomedical researchers will collect data about the H5N1 virus during laboratory research.This type of data will then call for quantitative analysis.”
  • C.K. - snap-back if incorrectly placed.Feedback for when they get them all into place: “Good job. How does this translate into knowledge production, transfer, sharing? {This probably needs more written to help transition to the next section on the history of info sharing…?}”
  • develop this section later….Library will provide images
  • Walk through example, have them answer questions about a second one. NOTE: I need to check with Erika, but not sure these abstracts are in the public domain. If not, I could do a little more checking re: copyright.
  • You can see—very interdisciplinary group—although notably lacking anyone from the MD program. These are the people who wrote the grant. What you can’t see on this is the political implications of this group. School of Vet Med is part of our CALS, which is served by the biology & life sciences library (part of our GLS); however, SVM students are heavy users of our facilities, and have asked to be given some of the same privileges that the other health sciences schools have. SMPH and the rest of the health sciences schools are served by Ebling Library, and organizationally we’re part of the med school not part of GLS. We collaborate, but it’s not a formal relationship, and as always in big institutions it can be easy to ruffle feathers when there’s a perception of turf areas.
  • Each of these will pop up, open over this screen and have a close button so that users will be back here after closing. Depending on the format of these samples, maybe we can have them identify one piece of information for each one or answer a question or something? But then they would come back to this screen to type in their answer.
  • Possible additional example to work with Another possible interaction would be to build an abstract.
  • References:AAVMC, 2009? - quote“Anthropology and Epidemiology: ” – Epistemology Referencehttp://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dgdq2j2v_70gj7vzwwx (Content behind path of research, further reading, citations).
  • Lots of portals libguides on campus w/ different info, but OH/OM specific was felt necessary to bridge interD divide.Another example of interesting politics—Ebling has our own web team, and have been creating our own portals for a few yrs. Campus bought LibGuide license a bit over a year ago, and has been steadily moving the subject guides that were on the GLS pages to libguides. Again, because this was such an interdisciplinary effort, we were under strong pressure to do this as a libguide, rather than as one of our Ebing-branded portals. Put together a small team—Allan Barclay, Gabe Gossett (SLIS student Sarah hired to help w/ this project). This was really helpful for the rest of the project, actually, because in pulling together the team, we had to explain to them the rest of the project, including the concept and the audience.Issues: who will be cntact. Do we create a OHOM team? Group email? Who’s in charge of keeping up to date (esp. once Gabe graduates and is gone)?Note—currently suffering form the common libguides problem of too much stuff. A lot of this will change..
  • Fill in background—Sarah asked to write letter of support & proposal, but not at the mtgs.In September I got asked to be involved (out of the blue email, no context), because the MPH and Global Health people on the committee had worked with me on other projects and portals.Because this is a SVM grant, we need to get Steenbock involved. Director asks us to meet w/ SVM liaison. Start talking to faculty to figure out what they’d want from these modules.Quick turn-around!
  • This is the detailed timeline proposed by the PI. You can imagine how well this went, dealing with faculty...
  • So as soon as we knew we were doing this, we began to meet w/faculty involved. (CurriculumDean for SVM, Asst. Director for GH, and Assoc Dir of MPH program). These are the sorts of questions we asked, to try to get up to speed on the project.

OHOM OHOM Presentation Transcript

  • FUSING INFORMATION LITERACY TO MULTIDISCIPLINARY GLOBAL HEALTH EDUCATION Erika L. Sevetson, MS Sarah McDaniel, MA University of Wisconsin – Madison
  • ABOUT ONE HEALTH  In July 2007, the AVMA launches a One Health Initiative and Task Force “to study the feasibility of a campaign to facilitate collaboration and cooperation among health science professions, academic institutions, governmental agencies, and industries to help with the assessment, treatment, and prevention of cross-species disease transmission and mutually prevalent, but non-transmitted, human and animal diseases, and medical conditions.”  The term One Health is defined as “the collaborative efforts of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally, and globally, to attain optimal health for people, animals, and our environment. Achieving the end point of One Health is truly one of the critical challenges facing humankind today.” One Health—A New Professional Imperative. Retrieved May 10, 2009, from http://www.avma.org/onehealth/preface.asp
  • THE GRANT OPPORTUNITY...  2007 – 08: UW Provost office launches the Technology- Enhanced Learning (TEL) Project.  The TEL (Technology-Enhanced Learning) Project will develop classroom learning modules, quot;hybridquot; and technology-heavy courses, searchable databases, and build capacity among UW–Madison faculty, instructors, and future faculty. Key to the TEL project will be developing teaching & learning collaborations across our schools and colleges, and creating ways to seamlessly integrate technology into our students' educational experience.  Three funding cycles, awarding $500,000 each cycle.
  • THE PROPOSAL  Spring 2008: Technology for Learning Center at School of Veterinary Medicine applies for TEL grant, focusing on One Health/One Medicine “On the UW-Madison campus we have a number of programs and departments concerned with the study of issues at the human/animal/ecosystem heath interface... These programs often share faculty for individual lectures and topics...a challenge is to not overburden the faculty by asking them to repeatedly present the same content to different classes and yet still provide an interdisciplinary approach. “We propose to capitalize on an electronic learning model based on a learning object architecture paradigm...The main idea is to break educational content down into small chunks that can be mixed, matched, or glued together to form a variety of instructional lessons or courses. “
  • THE PROPOSAL (PT. 2)  Target student base includes primarily graduate and professional degree students in the various collaborating programs: Veterinary Medicine, Public Health, Global Health, Environmental Studies.  Core topics proposed include research ethics, community-based research, and information literacy. General health related topics cover epidemiology, disease surveillance, and access to health and global information. Topics such as impacts on health due to climate changes, land use changes, biodiversity and health, industrial agricultural impacts on health, and food security cut across the One Health/One Medicine programs.
  • PLANNING GROUP P.I. Director, Technology for Learning Center, SVM Collaborating Units School of Veterinary Medicine Assoc. Dean(Curriculum) 2 faculty members School of Medicine and Public Health Master of Public Health, Associate Director Center for Global Health, Assistant Director Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment (Environmental Studies) 1 faculty member (dual appt in SMPH) UW Library’s Digital Collections Center Digital Repository Librarian
  • TIMELINE (2008-09)  April SVM writes/applies for TEL grant  Campus Info Lit coordinator works w/ Steenbock (Life Sciences library) Ed. Coord. (since retired) to propose Info Lit component.  Sept. Grant is funded. Planning group meets, GH faculty suggests Ebling be involved in Info Lit. portion.  Other LOs:  Why Ecohealth  The zoonosis story  Impact of anthropogenic global environmental changes on animal and human health  Cross cultural approach to health and disease  Sept. Meetings with faculty  Oct. Our first meeting w/ planning grp. Outlines of learning objects due.  Dec. Draft LOs due.
  • PROPOSED TIMELINE Task Responsible Party/Comment Completed? Identify topic Faculty and Project Staff 9/02/08 Identify faculty content expert Faculty and/or Project Staff 9/02/08 Schedule initial and follow-up meetings/in-person or phone Project Staff ongoing Discuss learning objectives that are specific and measurable Faculty and Project Staff; Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy; refine as project progresses Due 9/30/08 Develop teaching points Faculty; answer question “What do students need to know about this topic?” Due 9/30/08 Identify evidence-based information and other resources Faculty; Powerpoint presentations, articles, books, web sites, etc. Due 9/30/08 Outline the content Faculty Due 9/30/08 Develop the creative concept Project Staff Due 10/21/08 Create copy Project Staff Due 10/21/08 Modify and supplement as needed Faculty and Project Staff November Provide examples/cases Faculty November Develop interactive activities Faculty and Project Staff November Review iterations and make suggestions; modify and edit as Faculty and Project Staff December needed Develop assessment activities Faculty and Project Staff December Distribute for peer review; modify based on feedback Project Staff December Discuss/agree on final version Faculty and Project Staff January Place completed learning object in repository and provide Project Staff January access
  • CATCHING UP  Faculty mtgs  How would you use info lit. learning modules? (Pre-class, in- class)  What kind of information literacy instruction do your students already get? What else do they need?  What teaching points are needed by your students?  If we used avian flu as a framework, what would be a scenario that would speak to your students?  How do you see these LOs fitting into the whole curriculum (MPH, DVM, etc.)
  • MEETING OUTCOMES  Interesting goals and suggestions!  Tutorial on using different information sources (PubMed, etc.)  How to track diseases using WHO, maps, etc.  How to find & select information sources  Problems of global information access  Finding and selecting sources  Importance of an interdisciplinary approach
  • PROPOSED LOS  Interdisciplinarity  EBPH  Creating focused questions and evaluating information using a PICO, etc.  Access to information
  • PROPOSED LOS (REVISED)  Interdisciplinarity  Evaluating information, creating a focused research question (EBPH w/o the name)  Access to information  OneHealth Portal/LibGuide
  • ONE HEALTH – ONE MEDICINE: INFORMATION LITERACY INTERDISCIPLINARITY
  • AFTER COMPLETING THIS LESSON YOU WILL BE ABLE TO:  Discuss the ways that different disciplines approach problems in One Health/One Medicine;  Identify at least two disciplinary perspectives on a One Health/One Medicine problem; and  Identify elements in research results that provide clues to the disciplinary approach used in the research.  Describe how these perspectives/findings are shared in published research (research cycle).
  • In this lesson we will explore interdisciplinary research and it’s importance in the One Health /One Medicine approach to problem solving in the health sciences. Learn more about the origins of the One Health initiative by clicking on each of the buttons below. One Health Initiative Calvin Schwabe William Rudolf Osler Virchow
  • Humans Disease Animals Environment Global ―One Health is the collaborative effort of multiple disciplines – working locally, nationally, and globally – to attain optimal health for people, animals, and our environment‖ (AAVMC, 2009?).
  • A One Health approach is essential because no one person, profession, or nation can solve the major health problems we face today. Disease
  • Human Med Picture Disease Vet Med Picture Ecological Sci Picture
  • Human Med Picture Human Med Picture Ecological Sci Picture Human Med Picture Disease Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture Ecological Sci Picture Vet Med Picture
  • Human Med Picture Human Med Picture Ecological Sci Picture Human Med Picture Human Med Picture Disease Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture Ecological Sci Picture Vet Med Picture Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture
  • It takes a web of researchers Human Med Picture to resolve a problem. Human Med Picture Ecological Sci Picture Different disciplines bring different perspectives, approaches, and Human Med Picture methodologies to Med Picture and all of them combined make up a vast Human a problem web of knowledge about the topic. Disease Let’s continue by examining different approaches to Avian Influenza. Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture Ecological Sci Picture Vet Med Picture Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture
  • Avian Influenza RECENT OUTBREAKS OF AVIAN INFLUENZA IN ASIA HAVE CAUSED IMPACTS WORLDWIDE. LOCALLY, IT CAUSED HUMAN AND ANIMAL DEATHS AND IT COST THE WORLDWIDE ECONOMY TREMENDOUSLY. RESEARCHERS FOCUSED ON PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF AVIAN FLU POSE DIFFERENT QUESTIONS AS THEY WORK TO UNDERSTAND AND SOLVE THE PROBLEM. AS THEY APPEAR, MATCH THE RESEARCH QUESTION BELOW TO THE CORRECT DISCIPLINE BY DRAGGING IT INTO PLACE ON THE DIAGRAM How is avian flu transmitted to humans? Human Health Veterinary Anthropology Problem: Medicine Preventing the Spread of Avian Flu Public Health Wildlife Ecology
  • Disciplines conceive of problems differently which leads them to collect evidence from different sources and ultimately they employ different methods of analysis. For instance, some disciplines might be asking the type of questions that require a qualitative approach while others are primarily quantitative. Qualitative research involves Quantitative research involves analysis of descriptions. analysis of numerical data. vs. Data can be observed but not Data which can be measured. measured. (Colors, textures, smells, (Length, height, area, volume, tastes, appearance, beauty, etc.) weight, speed, time, temperature, humidity, sound levels, cost, Data can include words (e.g., from members, ages, etc.) interviews), pictures (e.g., video), or objects (e.g., an artifact). Quantitative → Quantity Qualitative → Quality [Not sure what from the OH/OM checklist you wanted to include here so I just put in this basic info. Perhaps just a link to the ―Checklist for Evaluating Research‖ document?]
  • Avian Influenza LET’S RETURN TO THE CASE OF THE 2003 HONG KONG AVIAN INFLUENZA OUTBREAK. EXAMINE THIS DIAGRAM DEPICTING RESEARCHERS FROM 4 DISCIPLINES AND THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS. THINK ABOUT THE TYPE OF DATA THEY WILL NEED TO COLLECT, WHERE IT WILL COME FROM AND WHAT ANALYSIS METHODS THEY MIGHT EMPLOY. USE THAT INFORMATION TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. Public Health Which researcher is most Anthropologist Veterinarian likely to use a qualitative What is the cultural What are effective importance of practices for increasing approach? domestic chicken influenza vaccination raising in China? among Chinese domestic poultry populations? Public Health Veterinarian Problem: Public Health Practitioner Preventing Anthropologist the Spread Biomedical Researcher of Avian Biomedical Public Health Practitioner/Researc Flu Researcher [Submit] her How has the What was the role of public health nurses in H5N1 virus controlling the 2003 evolved in the Hong Kong AI past 10 years? outbreak?
  • Avian Influenza LET’S RETURN TO THE CASE OF THE 2003 HONG KONG AVIAN INFLUENZA OUTBREAK. EXAMINE THIS DIAGRAM DEPICTING RESEARCHERS FROM 4 DISCIPLINES AND THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS. THINK ABOUT THE TYPE OF DATA THEY WILL NEED TO COLLECT, WHERE IT WILL COME FROM AND WHAT ANALYSIS METHODS THEY MIGHT EMPLOY. USE THAT INFORMATION TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. Public Health Which professionals are Anthropologist Veterinarian most likely to use a blend of What is the cultural What are effective importance of practices for increasing qualitative and quantitative domestic chicken influenza vaccination analysis methods? raising in China? among Chinese domestic (check all that apply) poultry populations? Problem: Preventing Public Health Veterinarian the Spread Public Health Practitioner of Avian Public Health Flu Biomedical Anthropologist Researcher Practitioner/Researc Biomedical Researcher her How has the What was the role of public health nurses in H5N1 virus controlling the 2003 evolved in the [Submit] Hong Kong AI past 10 years? outbreak?
  • Avian Influenza LET’S RETURN TO THE CASE OF THE 2003 HONG KONG AVIAN INFLUENZA OUTBREAK. EXAMINE THIS DIAGRAM DEPICTING RESEARCHERS FROM 4 DISCIPLINES AND THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS. THINK ABOUT THE TYPE OF DATA THEY WILL NEED TO COLLECT, WHERE IT WILL COME FROM AND WHAT ANALYSIS METHODS THEY MIGHT EMPLOY. USE THAT INFORMATION TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. Public Health Which researcher is mostl Anthropologist Veterinarian likely to collect their data What is the cultural What are effective importance of practices for increasing directly from the infectious domestic chicken influenza vaccination agent? raising in China? among Chinese domestic poultry populations? Problem: Public Health Veterinarian Preventing Public Health Practitioner the Spread Anthropologist of Avian Public Health Flu Biomedical Biomedical Researcher Practitioner/Researc Researcher her How has the What was the role of H5N1 virus [Submit] public health nurses in controlling the 2003 evolved in the Hong Kong AI past 10 years? outbreak?
  • There’s no doubt that multidisciplinary information is easier to find than ever before. But not all articles about your research topic are created equal - you must be able to decode clues about the author’s discipline to be an effective researcher. Understanding how to interpret interdisciplinary research is vital to a One Health /One Medicine approach.
  • Summary Human Med Picture By now you should have a better understanding of why interdisciplinary Human Med Picture research is important in the One Health /One Medicine approach to Ecological Sci Picture problem solving in the health sciences. It’s important to remember Human Med Picture that: Human Med Picture • Disease Different disciplines approach the same health problem in different ways; • These differing perspectives create a vast webpictureknowledge that Anthropology of Vet Med Picture can be used by researchers seeking to work with a One Ecological Sci Picture Health/One Medicine approach; and • You must identify elements in research results that provide clues to the disciplinary approachVet Med Picture research. used in the Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture
  • WHAT’S NEXT? Decoding clues about an author’s discipline is one step in conducting interdisciplinary research. You must also evaluate the quality of the information in the article. Learn more about how in this “Evaluating Research” tutorial. With an understanding of different disciplinary approaches and the ability to evaluate research, you’ll be ready to conduct interdisciplinary research. How will you use it to inform your work? To get started, download this worksheet . For more information and resources about One Health / One Medicine, visit the UW Madison research portal on the topic.
  • PORTAL
  • PORTAL
  • CONCLUSIONS/LESSONS LEARNED In a multidisciplinary, somewhat fuzzy project such as this you need:  Clarity of goals  Firm deadlines  SLIS student (hopefully)
  • PARTICIPANTS  Gabe Gossett  Eileen Horn  Barb Hamel  Jeannette McDonald  Chris Hooper-Lane  C.K. Worel (sp?)  Collaborating faculty:  Allan Barclay  Chris Olsen  Kurt Sladtky  Lori DiPrete Brown  Jonathan Patz  Barbara Duerst
  • THANK YOU  PH/HA Section  PSS Section  UW – Madison
  • LINKS Sample Learning Objects  Neatproject.org: bit.ly/yCgDc Slides
  •  Full learning object slides follow
  • ONE HEALTH – ONE MEDICINE: INFORMATION LITERACY INTERDISCIPLINARITY
  • AFTER COMPLETING THIS LESSON YOU WILL BE ABLE TO:  Discuss the ways that different disciplines approach problems in One Health/One Medicine;  Identify at least two disciplinary perspectives on a One Health/One Medicine problem; and  Identify elements in research results that provide clues to the disciplinary approach used in the research.  Describe how these perspectives/findings are shared in published research (research cycle).
  • In this lesson we will explore interdisciplinary research and it’s importance in the One Health /One Medicine approach to problem solving in the health sciences. Learn more about the origins of the One Health initiative by clicking on each of the buttons below. [Embedded One Health/One Medicine LO] One Health Initiative Calvin Schwabe William Rudolf Osler Virchow
  • Humans Disease Animals Environment Global ―One Health is the collaborative effort of multiple disciplines – working locally, nationally, and globally – to attain optimal health for people, animals, and our environment‖ (AAVMC, 2009?).
  • A One Health approach is essential because no one person, profession, or nation can solve the major health problems we face today. Disease
  • Human Med Picture Disease Vet Med Picture Ecological Sci Picture
  • Human Med Picture Human Med Picture Ecological Sci Picture Human Med Picture Disease Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture Ecological Sci Picture Vet Med Picture
  • Human Med Picture Human Med Picture Ecological Sci Picture Human Med Picture Human Med Picture Disease Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture Ecological Sci Picture Vet Med Picture Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture
  • It takes a web of researchers Human Med Picture to resolve a problem. Human Med Picture Ecological Sci Picture Different disciplines bring different perspectives, approaches, and Human Med Picture methodologies to Med Picture and all of them combined make up a vast Human a problem web of knowledge about the topic. Disease Let’s continue by examining different approaches to Avian Influenza. Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture Ecological Sci Picture Vet Med Picture Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture
  • Avian Influenza RECENT OUTBREAKS OF AVIAN INFLUENZA IN ASIA HAVE CAUSED IMPACTS WORLDWIDE. LOCALLY, IT CAUSED HUMAN AND ANIMAL DEATHS AND IT COST THE WORLDWIDE ECONOMY TREMENDOUSLY. RESEARCHERS FOCUSED ON PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF AVIAN FLU POSE DIFFERENT QUESTIONS AS THEY WORK TO UNDERSTAND AND SOLVE THE PROBLEM. AS THEY APPEAR, MATCH THE RESEARCH QUESTION BELOW TO THE CORRECT DISCIPLINE BY DRAGGING IT INTO PLACE ON THE DIAGRAM How is avian flu transmitted to humans? Human Health Veterinary Anthropology Problem: Medicine Preventing the Spread of Avian Flu Public Health Wildlife Ecology
  • Think about why disciplines differ in their approaches. Write your thoughts about why these differences exist below. [Submit] [This appears onSubmit] Did you think about differences in training and research methods? Training and research methods in a discipline are centered on its epistemology. Epistemology is the creation and dissemination of knowledge in particular areas of inquiry.
  • Disciplines conceive of problems differently which leads them to collect evidence from different sources and ultimately they employ different methods of analysis. For instance, some disciplines might be asking the type of questions that require a qualitative approach while others are primarily quantitative. Qualitative research involves Quantitative research involves analysis of descriptions. analysis of numerical data. vs. Data can be observed but not Data which can be measured. measured. (Colors, textures, smells, (Length, height, area, volume, tastes, appearance, beauty, etc.) weight, speed, time, temperature, humidity, sound levels, cost, Data can include words (e.g., from members, ages, etc.) interviews), pictures (e.g., video), or objects (e.g., an artifact). Quantitative → Quantity Qualitative → Quality [Not sure what from the OH/OM checklist you wanted to include here so I just put in this basic info. Perhaps just a link to the ―Checklist for Evaluating Research‖ document?]
  • Avian Influenza LET’S RETURN TO THE CASE OF THE 2003 HONG KONG AVIAN INFLUENZA OUTBREAK. EXAMINE THIS DIAGRAM DEPICTING RESEARCHERS FROM 4 DISCIPLINES AND THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS. THINK ABOUT THE TYPE OF DATA THEY WILL NEED TO COLLECT, WHERE IT WILL COME FROM AND WHAT ANALYSIS METHODS THEY MIGHT EMPLOY. USE THAT INFORMATION TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. Public Health Which researcher is most Anthropologist Veterinarian likely to use a qualitative What is the cultural What are effective importance of practices for increasing approach? domestic chicken influenza vaccination raising in China? among Chinese domestic poultry populations? Public Health Veterinarian Problem: Public Health Practitioner Preventing Anthropologist the Spread Biomedical Researcher of Avian Biomedical Public Health Practitioner/Researc Flu Researcher [Submit] her How has the What was the role of public health nurses in H5N1 virus controlling the 2003 evolved in the Hong Kong AI past 10 years? outbreak?
  • Avian Influenza LET’S RETURN TO THE CASE OF THE 2003 HONG KONG AVIAN INFLUENZA OUTBREAK. EXAMINE THIS DIAGRAM DEPICTING RESEARCHERS FROM 4 DISCIPLINES AND THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS. THINK ABOUT THE TYPE OF DATA THEY WILL NEED TO COLLECT, WHERE IT WILL COME FROM AND WHAT ANALYSIS METHODS THEY MIGHT EMPLOY. USE THAT INFORMATION TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. Public Health Which professionals are Anthropologist Veterinarian most likely to use a blend of What is the cultural What are effective importance of practices for increasing qualitative and quantitative domestic chicken influenza vaccination analysis methods? raising in China? among Chinese domestic (check all that apply) poultry populations? Problem: Preventing Public Health Veterinarian the Spread Public Health Practitioner of Avian Public Health Flu Biomedical Anthropologist Researcher Practitioner/Researc Biomedical Researcher her How has the What was the role of public health nurses in H5N1 virus controlling the 2003 evolved in the [Submit] Hong Kong AI past 10 years? outbreak?
  • Avian Influenza LET’S RETURN TO THE CASE OF THE 2003 HONG KONG AVIAN INFLUENZA OUTBREAK. EXAMINE THIS DIAGRAM DEPICTING RESEARCHERS FROM 4 DISCIPLINES AND THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS. THINK ABOUT THE TYPE OF DATA THEY WILL NEED TO COLLECT, WHERE IT WILL COME FROM AND WHAT ANALYSIS METHODS THEY MIGHT EMPLOY. USE THAT INFORMATION TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. Public Health Which researcher is mostl Anthropologist Veterinarian likely to collect their data What is the cultural What are effective importance of practices for increasing directly from the infectious domestic chicken influenza vaccination agent? raising in China? among Chinese domestic poultry populations? Problem: Public Health Veterinarian Preventing Public Health Practitioner the Spread Anthropologist of Avian Public Health Flu Biomedical Biomedical Researcher Practitioner/Researc Researcher her How has the What was the role of H5N1 virus [Submit] public health nurses in controlling the 2003 evolved in the Hong Kong AI past 10 years? outbreak?
  • Avian Influenza LET’S RETURN TO THE CASE OF THE 2003 HONG KONG AVIAN INFLUENZA OUTBREAK. EXAMINE THIS DIAGRAM DEPICTING RESEARCHERS FROM 4 DISCIPLINES AND THEIR RESEARCH QUESTIONS. THINK ABOUT THE TYPE OF DATA THEY WILL NEED TO COLLECT, WHERE IT WILL COME FROM AND WHAT ANALYSIS METHODS THEY MIGHT EMPLOY. USE THAT INFORMATION TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS. Public Health Anthropologist Veterinarian What is the cultural What are effective After the outbreak is over, importance of practices for increasing what happens to their domestic chicken influenza vaccination raising in China? among Chinese domestic findings? How can other poultry populations? researchers learn from what Problem: these did? Preventing the Spread of Avian Let’s take a look at the Public Health Biomedical Practitioner/Researc Flu Researcher research cycle and how her How has the information is disseminated. What was the role of public health nurses in H5N1 virus controlling the 2003 evolved in the Hong Kong AI past 10 years? outbreak?
  • First we’ll take a quick look at the steps in the research cycle. Put the 5 steps below into the correct order by dragging them to the correct place on the diagram. Developing a Research Question/Hypothesis Publishing Results Reviewing the Literature: Searching and Evaluation 4 Building Data through Analyzing Data Experiments or Studies
  • HISTORY OF HOW INFORMATION IS DISSEMINATED  Back in the day, researchers shared info primarily with others in their field (SHOW: bound vols. of “Journal of VetMed” in library stacks, dating back to 1800s, show a page)  Researchers looked for information by discipline (SHOW: page of printed index for vetmed). You could be confident that you knew about all the important research in your field.  When computer-based searching began, you could search all the years of a publication at once (SCREENSHOT: CAB abstracts description).  Today, on the web and in huge, multidisciplinary databases like Web of Knowledge, you can find research across disciplines and time periods (SCREENSHOTS: Google Scholar, Web of Knowledge)
  • There’s no doubt that multidisciplinary information is easier to find than ever before. But not all articles about your research topic are created equal - you must be able to decode clues about the author’s discipline to be an effective researcher. Understanding how to interpret interdisciplinary research is vital to a One Health /One Medicine approach.
  • WHAT CLUES TO DISCIPLINARY APPROACH WILL YOU FIND IN YOUR SEARCH RESULTS? There are some factors that indicate a disciplinary context while other elements indicate research methodology. The types of information included or not also provide clues that you can interpret. Below we’ve provided 2 different types of articles. Examine each of these to learn what you should look for. Article 1 Article 2
  • ARTICLE #1 Title includes ―custom,‖ ―science ―(points to an anthropologic & scientific perspective) Journal title and subject headings also indicate focus of article
  • ARTICLE #1 (CONT.) No indication of research methods— implies qualitative design. References to social structure indicate a primarily anthropological perspective, but focus is on the interplay of cultural factors with infectious disease and economic factors.
  • ARTICLE #2 Objectives and study design stated clearly—indicates a quantitative study Structured abstracts (which include elements such as Objectives, Study Design, Methods, Results, and Conclusions) are common to fields such as epidemiology, biomedicine, and the life sciences. They’re often used to describe the results of a clinical trial or cohort study.
  • Avian Influenza TRY IT YOURSELF! Can you identify the discipline of each of the research papers below? Click on each article and look for the clues that you just learned about (and answer questions?). After you’ve looked at them all, identify the discipline for each one and check your answers. 1 2 3 Medicine Sociology Veterinary [Submit]
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  • Summary Human Med Picture By now you should have a better understanding of why interdisciplinary Human Med Picture research is important in the One Health /One Medicine approach to Ecological Sci Picture problem solving in the health sciences. It’s important to remember Human Med Picture that: Human Med Picture • Disease Different disciplines approach the same health problem in different ways; • These differing perspectives create a vast webpictureknowledge that Anthropology of Vet Med Picture can be used by researchers seeking to work with a One Ecological Sci Picture Health/One Medicine approach; and • You must identify elements in research results that provide clues to the disciplinary approachVet Med Picture research. used in the Vet Med Picture Anthropology picture
  • WHAT’S NEXT? Decoding clues about an author’s discipline is one step in conducting interdisciplinary research. You must also evaluate the quality of the information in the article. Learn more about how in this “Evaluating Research” tutorial. With an understanding of different disciplinary approaches and the ability to evaluate research, you’ll be ready to conduct interdisciplinary research. How will you use it to inform your work? To get started, download this worksheet . For more information and resources about One Health / One Medicine, visit the UW Madison research portal on the topic.
  • CREDITS Content Author: Sarah McDaniel Erika Svetson J. Gabe Gossett University of Wisconsin – Madison Production: Eileen Horn, BA - Instructional Designer CK Worrell, BFA – Media Designer Jeannette McDonald, DVM, PhD - Producer With support from: The University of Wisconsin Technology Enhance Learning grant program Printable summary PDF including resources
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