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Syllabus  International  Advanced   Diploma In  Business
 

Syllabus International Advanced Diploma In Business

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    Syllabus  International  Advanced   Diploma In  Business Syllabus International Advanced Diploma In Business Document Transcript

    • YEAR 2International Advanced Diploma in Business(IDB) 
    • BSc (Honours) Business Administration programme is in three stages. Year 1: NCC Education International Diploma in Business  Year 2: NCC Education International Advanced Diploma in Business Year 3: BSc (Hons) in Business Administration, delivered online by NCC Education, validated and awarded by the University of Wales. *For futher details regarding the University and its validation services, please log on to www.wales.ac.uk/validation or email validation@wales.ac.uk International Advanced Diploma in Business (IADB) is equivalent to year two of a UK Honours Degree (60 ECTS) The programme is delivered in two 15-week semesters (12 teaching weeks) in which four modules are studied. Each academic year requires around 400 hours of compulsory study in classroom (equivalent to 14/15h per week) plus homework and other independent study. Starting point for students embarking on a career in Business
    • Contents…SyllabusModulesManagerial EconomicsQuantitative MethodsMarketing ManagementHuman Resource ManagementUnderstanding Consumer BehaviourApplications of Financial ControlPrinciples of Business OperationsInformation Systems and Organisations
    • Module Title: Managerial Economics Level: IADB Credits 15Overview of the module:This module examines how an organisation can achieve its objectives most efficientlythrough the application of micro-economic theory and the tools of analysis of decisionscience, such as statistics and quantitative methods. It shows how economic analysis can beused in formulating business policies.2. Module Delivery Suggested Learning Hours Lectures: Tutorials: Seminar: Laboratory: Private study: Total: 24 12 - - 114 150Contents CLASS SUBJECT 1 The nature and scope of Managerial Economics. Tutorial topic: The Theory of the Firm. 2 Types of analysis: optimisation. Tutorial topic: Optimisation using Total, Average and Marginal Relationships. 3 Risk analysis. Tutorial topic: Incorporating Risk into Managerial Decisions. 4 Regression analysis. Tutorial Topic: Multiple Regression Analysis. 5 Demand theory. Tutorial Topic: Point and Arc Elasticity of demand. 6 Demand analysis and forecasting. Tutorial Topic: Time Series Analysis. 7 Production theory and estimation. Tutorial Topic: The Production Function with Two Variable Inputs. 8 Cost theory and estimation. Tutorial Topic: Short Run and Long Cost Curves. Minimisation. 9 Linear programming. Tutorial Topic: Constrained Cost 10 Market structure. Tutorial Topic: Imperfect Competition. 11 Pricing practices. Tutorial Topic: Price Discrimination. 12 Capital budgeting, public goods and cost- benefit analysis. Tutorial Topic: The Cost of Capital.Indicative readingEssential Textbook: Salvatore, D. (2004) Managerial Economics in a Global Economy 5th ed.Thomson LearningISBN-10: 0324171870
    • ISBN-13: 978-0324171877OrSalvatore, D. (2007) Managerial Economics in a Global Economy 6th ed. Oxford UniversityPressISBN-10: 0195307194ISBN-13: 978-01953071913. Module AssessmentModule Learning OutcomesOn completion of this module the student should be able to:Knowledge and understanding 1. Discuss and explain the well established concepts and Understanding principles, and their limits in managerial economics.Intellectual Skills 1. Evaluate and assess the application of alternative theories, techniques and principles to real life business problems. 2. Evaluate the alternative solutions developed from the application of analysis techniques.Practical Skills1. Apply a range of suitable techniques to develop alternative solutions to businessproblems.Transferable Skills1. Application of quantitative methods.Assessment Methods:Number, Type and Weighting of ElementExamination (Open Book) 100%
    • Module Title: Quantitative Methods Level: IADB Credits 15Overview of the module:This module builds on a student’s previous experience of quantitative methods, introducingmore advanced techniques applicable to decision-making in business.2. Module Delivery Suggested Learning Hours Lectures: Tutorials: Seminar: Laboratory: Private study: Total: 24 12 - - 114 150Contents CLASS SUBJECT 1 Introduction and measures of central tendency. Practise lecture topics by working through review activity page 63. 2 Measures of dispersion. Practise lecture topics by reading page 75, working through review activity 2 page 74, one of questions 1-3 page 76, one of questions 5-7 page 77. 3 Sampling methods. Practise lecture topics by working through review activity on page 11, questions 4, 6 page 19. 4 Correlation analysis, regression analysis. Practise lecture topics by working through review activity 1 on pages 91, review activity 2 on page 94, review activity 3 on page 98, question 6 on page 103. Review topic with key points to remember on pages 99-100. 5 Time series analysis. Practise lecture topics by working through review activity on page 201, review activity 3 on page 207, question 2 on page 209. Review topic with key points on page 208. 6 Index numbers. Practise lecture topics by working through review activity 1 on page 181, 2 on page 185, questions 3, 4 on pages 186-187. Review topic with key points on pages 185. Work through supplementary questions 1. 7 Confidence intervals. Practise lecture topics by working through review activity 1 on page 129, 2 on page 135, 3 on page 139, questions 3, 6, 7 on pages 140-141. 8 Significance testing. For this topic use Quantitative Methods by Louise Swift: Practise lecture topics by working through assessment 2 question 3 page 559, assessment 3 on pages 574-575 questions 1, 3, 4. Review topic with structure on page 557. 9 Algebra applied to Business and Economics. For this topic use Quantitative Methods by Louise Swift: Practise lecture topics by working through assessment 3 question 1 on
    • page 148, assessment 4 question 2 on page 157, assessment 3 question 4 on page 180, assessment 2 question 3 on page 200, assessment 6 on page 215 question 1. 10 Differentiation. For this topic use Quantitative Methods by Louise Swift: Practise lecture topics by working through assessment 1 questions 1, 2, 3 on page 223. Complete all the examples in the lecture notes. 11 Applications of differentiation. For this topic use Quantitative Methods by Louise Swift: Practise lecture topics by working through assessment 3 questions 3, 4, 5, 6 on page 236. Assessment 4 questions 6, 7. 12 Integration, applications of integration. Work through supplementary questionsIndicative readingEssential Textbook: McGrane, A and Smailes, J. (2000) Essential Business StatisticsFT Prentice HallISBN-10: 0273643339ISBN-13: 978-0273643333Other Materials: Swift, L. and Piff, S. (2005) Quantitative Methods for Business, Managementand Finance 2nd ed. Palgrave MacmillanISBN-10: 1403935289ISBN-13: 978-14039352813. Module AssessmentModule Learning OutcomesOn completion of this module the student should be able to:Knowledge and understanding 1. Understand a range of mathematical concepts and Understanding techniques. 2. Explain how mathematical techniques can be used to support decision-making in business.Intellectual Skills 1. Evaluate different approaches to business problem-solving.Practical Skills 1. Apply a range of mathematical techniques to the solution of business problems. 2. Present, evaluate and interpret data, to develop lines of argument and make sound judgements in areas of business and management.Transferable Skills 1. Communicate results of studies/research effectively.
    • Assessment Methods:Number, Type and Weighting of ElementExamination 100% Module Title: Marketing Management Level: IADB Credits 15Overview of the module:This module highlights the need for managers to view the role of marketing as critical totheir organisation. The crucial role of marketing in contributing to the success oforganisations will be emphasised.2. Module Delivery Suggested Learning Hours Lectures: Tutorials: Seminar: Laboratory: Private study: Total: 24 12 - - 114 150Contents CLASS SUBJECT 1 Marketing and customer r/ships in the 21st century. Case study analysis. 2 Strategic marketing planning, implementation and control. Newspaper/Journal articles, reading and discussion. 3 Buyer behaviour in consumer markets. Class discussion, with real-life examples. 4 Buyer behaviour in business markets. Case study analysis. 5 Competitive advantage. Class discussion, with real-life examples. 6 Market segmentation. Class discussion in small groups. 7 Market targeting. Cases and class discussions. 8 Product management. Cases and class discussions. 9 Product planning and promotion. Cases and class discussions. 10 Design and management of services. Case study analysis. 11 Development of pricing strategies. Case study analysis. 12 Selecting and managing marketing channels and managing the sales force. Class discussion.Indicative readingEssential Textbook: Kotler, P, Keller, K (2005) Marketing Management 12th ed. FT PrenticeHallISBN-10: 0131457578ISBN-13: 978-0131457577
    • 3. Module AssessmentModule Learning OutcomesOn completion of this module the student should be able to:Knowledge and understanding1. Discuss and explain marketing management.Intellectual Skills 1. Explain the building of strong brands and shaping market offerings. 2. Analyse the building of brands and the shaping of markets.Practical Skills 1. Capture marketing insights and know how to connect with customers. 2. Deliver and communicate value.Assessment Methods:Number, Type and Weighting of ElementAssignment 100%
    • Module Title: Human Resource Management Level: IADB Credits 15Overview of the moduleThis module covers the dynamic role of human resource management policies and practicesin contemporary organisations and their contribution to organisation goals. It defines andcritically examines the major philosophies, policies, procedures and practices related to themanagement of human resources.2. Module Delivery Suggested Learning Hours Lectures: Tutorials: Seminar: Laboratory: Private study: Total: 24 12 - - 114 150Contents CLASS SUBJECT 1 Overview of HRM: Introduction to the nature of HRM; link between business and HR strategy, role of HRM in strategy; scope of planning, analysing and forecasting needs. 2 Resourcing: Strategic aspects, analysing trends and labour markets, flexibility; contracts, consultants, outsourcing. 3 Recruitment and Selection: Vacancies, methods, advertising, evaluation, shortlisting; selection process, criteria, and methods, and decision-making. 4 Retention and Contracts: Turnover rates, analysis and costing, retention strategies; unfair, constructive, and wrongful dismissal, compensation, retirement. 5 Strategic and Organisational Performance: Influences and processes, high performance, HR policies, initiatives, evaluation; learning organisations, knowledge management and managing knowledge. 6 Individual and Team Performance: Performance management and appraisal, stages, 360 degree feedback; nature of teamwork, team types and effectiveness. 7 Leadership, Motivation, and Managing Absence: Leadership traits, styles, and behaviours, situational context, influence of motivation; process and causes of absence, managing attendance. 8 Development: Organisational strategy, labour market, training and development roles; competence(s) and behaviours; nature, methods, and evaluation for learning and development; career development and management. 9 Employee Relations: Trends, individual and collective perspectives; union recognition, law, and consultation; health, safety, and welfare, stress, occupational health. 10 Equality: The legal framework and discrimination; diversity and defined minority groups; Milgram experiments, discipline and grievance processes and procedures.
    • 11 Pay and Incentives: Reward strategy, employee objectives, approaches and elements, equity; job evaluation structures and methods; incentive schemes and disadvantages; pensions and benefits. 12 Cross-functional issues: International and cultural differences, barriers to communication; ethical issues and dilemmas; work life balance practices and problems; Measuring HR, scorecards.Indicative readingTEXT:Torrington, D. And Hall, L. And Taylor, S. (2004) Human Resource Management 6th ed. FTPrentice HallISBN-10: 0273687131ISBN-13: 978-0273687139OrTorrington, D. And Hall, L. And Taylor, S. (2007) Human Resource Management 7th ed. FTPrentice HallISBN-10: 0273710753ISBN-13: 978-02737107523. Module AssessmentModule Learning OutcomesOn completion of this module the student should be able to:Knowledge and understanding 1. Discuss and explain the established principles and practices of HRM and their contribution to organisational goals and change.Intellectual Skills: 1. Evaluate and asses the application of alternative policies, practices and techniques to real world HRM problems. 2. Apply a range of HRM policies, practices, and techniques in novel situations to develop alternative solutions to business problems. 3. Evaluate the impact of worker/management relationships and HRM policies in selected geographical regions of the world.Assessment Methods:Number, Type and Weighting of Element100%: Final Assignment
    • Module Title: Understanding Consumer Behaviour Level: IADB Credits 15Overview of the moduleThis module explores the factors that influence consumer behaviour including individualinfluences such as motives, values and perceptions and influences that derive from beingpart of a group. It also aims to provide insights into why consumers respond the way theydo to marketing activities and the relevance of the theories of consumer behaviour tomarketing decisions. The focus of the unit is on the consumer as an individual butcomparisons will also be made with organisational buying decisions.2. Module Delivery: Suggested Learning Hours Lectures: Tutorials: Seminar: Laboratory: Private study: Total: 24 12 - - 114 150Contents CLASS SUBJECT 1 Introduction to consumer behaviour. Influence of consumer motives and values. Module overview. Examination of needs and wants and the theories of motivation. Relationship between values and motivation. Evans et al Ch 1 2 Influence of consumer demographics. Examination of the role of age, gender and social grade in consumer behaviour. Evans et al Ch5 3 Influence of consumer psychographics. Examination of the role of personality in consumer behaviour. Evans et al Ch 6 4 Influence of social groups, family and culture. Examination of the nature of social group influence of consumer behaviour. Examination of how families buy and the relative contributions to the buying process. Examination of the nature of different consumer values across cultures. Evans et al Ch 7 & 8 5 New product buying. Examination of new product buying behaviour – diffusion-adoption of innovation theories. Evans et al Ch 9 6 Repeat buying, loyalty and relational buying. Examination of the nature of switching, defection and repeat purchasing. Encouraging customer loyalty. The nature and benefits of relational interaction between consumers and organisations. Evans et al Ch 10 7 Organisational buying behaviour. Examination of the differences between consumer and business markets. The organisation buying centre. The organization buying process and major influences. Evans et al Ch 13 8 Consumer response to marketing – exposure, attention and perception. Examination of the hierarchy of effects model- exposure, attention and perception Evans et al Ch 2
    • 9 Consumer response to marketing – learning, attitude and action. Examination of the hierarchy of effects model – learning, attitude and action. Evans et al Ch 3 & 4 10 Consumer response to marketing – post- purchase. Examination of how consumers respond post-purchase. Customer satisfaction, post-purchase dissonance. Levels of consumer involvement in decision making. Evans et al Ch 4 11 Researching consumer behaviour. Examination of the complexity of identifying consumers’ motives. Motivation research techniques. Attitude measures. Evans et al Ch 1 &3 12 Researching consumer behaviour – personalised databases. Examination of the use of consumer buying information to explain and predict consumers’ behaviour and facilitate individualised consumer-organisational interaction. Transactional data, pre- purchase data, geodemographics. Evans et al CH 11Indicative readingTEXT: Evans M, Jamal A, Foxhall G (2009) Consumer Behaviour, 2ed. John Wiley & SonsLtdISBN-10: 0470994657ISBN-13: 978-04709946583. Module AssessmentModule Learning OutcomesAfter completing this course, you should be able to:Knowledge and understanding1. Describe and appraise the importance of understanding consumer behaviour2. Describe and explain the established theories used to explain consumer behaviour3. Compare the differences between consumer and organisational buying decisionsIntellectual Skills1. Demonstrate the relationship between the theory of consumer behaviour and thedevelopment of marketing activities2. Critically analyse marketing activities and identify underlying consumer behaviourtheoriesPractical Skills1. Apply theoretical frameworks to real world consumer contextsAssessment Methods:Number, Type and Weighting of Element
    • Final Assignment- 100% Module Title: Applications of Financial Control Level: IADB Credits 15Overview of the module:This module is designed to build upon the general financial intelligence students will haveaccumulated in the pre-requisite module. Students will not be expected to demonstrate indepth knowledge of existing accounting standards.2. Module Delivery Suggested Learning Hours Lectures: Tutorials: Seminar: Laboratory: Private study: Total: 24 12 - - 114 150Contents CLASS SUBJECT 1 Preparing Published Financial Statements I. Lecture (Chapters 3 and 4 of Elliot text): Balance sheet, Income statement Tutorial: Questions 1, 2 (pages 86-88) Questions 1, 2 (pages 109-110) 2 Preparing Published Financial Statements II Lecture (Chapter 21 of Elliot text): Cash flow statement Tutorial: Questions 1,2 (pages 486-488) 3 Preparation of Consolidated Accounts I Lecture (Chapters 15 and 16 of Elliot text): Balance sheet Tutorial: Questions 7, 8 on page 376-377 Question 1 on pages 389 4 Preparation of Consolidated Accounts II Lecture (Chapter 17 and 18 of Elliot text): Income statement Tutorial: Questions 1, 2 (pages 400-401) Questions 1, 2 (pages 419-421)
    • 5 Interpretation of Consolidated Accounts Lecture (Chapter 22 of Elliot text): Ratio analysis Tutorial: Question 3 (page 527) 6 Corporate Governance and Ethics Lecture (Chapter 25 and 27 of Elliot text): Corporate governance, Ethical codes Tutorial: Question 2 page 618 7 Standard Costing Lecture (Chapter 22 of Weetman text): The control process, Cost variances, Variance analysis Tutorial: Questions B22.1-B22.3 and C22.1-C22.3 (pages 621-625) 8 Break Even Analysis Lecture (Chapter 20 of Weetman text): Applications, Limitations, Pricing decisions Tutorial: Questions B20.1-C20.1 (pages 554-555) 9 Performance Evaluation Lecture (Chapter 23 of Weetman text): Preparing performance reports, Performance measures Tutorial: Questions C23.1-C23.2 (pages 646-647) 10 Capital Investment Appraisal I Lecture (Chapter 24 of Weetman text pages 652-655): ARR, NPV Tutorial: Questions B24.1, B24.3, B24.4 (pages 675- 676) 11 Capital Investment Appraisal II Lecture (Chapter 24 of Weetman text pages 665-679): IRR, Mutually exclusive projects Tutorial: Questions B24.2, C24.1-C24.2 (pages 676-677) 12 Business Strategy and Management Accounting Lecture (Chapter 24 of Weetman text): Control of investment projects Tutorial: Questions B25.1-C25.1 (pages 693-694)Indicative reading
    • Essential Textbook: Elliiot, B and Elliot, J. (2005) Financial Accounting, Reporting andAnalysis: International Edition 2nd ed. FT Prentice HallISBN-10: 027370253XISBN-13: 978-0273702535Weetman, P. (2006) Financial and Management Accounting: An IntroductionFT Prentice HallISBN-10: 0273703692ISBN-13: 978-0273703693Other Materials www.pearsoned.co.uk/elliot_elliot www.pearsoned.co.uk/weetman3. Module AssessmentModule Learning OutcomesOn completion of this module the student should be able to:Knowledge and understanding 1. Understand published financial statements and the preparation of balance sheets, income statements and cash flow statements. 2. Discuss and explain group accounting including associate and subsidiary companies. 3. Discuss and explain standard costing and the preparation and interpretation of variance analysis statements. 4. Discuss and explain the techniques of performance evaluation. 5. Understand the role of management accounting in supporting strategic decision making.Intellectual Skills1. Interpret and analyse financial performance using ratio analysis and preparation of relevant reports.2. Critically evaluate the role of good corporate governance and ethics in accounting.3. Critically analyse the relative advantages and disadvantages of investment appraisal reports.4. Critically reflect on the role of management accounting in supporting strategic decision making.Practical Skills1. Prepare consolidated balance sheets and consolidated income statements.2. Prepare break even analysis statements and interpretation of computations.3. Prepare investment appraisal reports using standard appraisal techniques.Assessment Methods:
    • Number, Type and Weighting of ElementExamination (Open Book) 100% Module Title: Principles of Business Operations Level: IADB Credits 15Overview of the module:The Operations Management function is about creating and sustaining effective and efficientoperations that deliver the products or services in a manner that achieves the objectives ofthe organisation, with respect to cost, quality, flexibility, dependability and speed.Operations management deals with all planning and design activities, from the location ofany manufacturing or service company through to the acquisition of raw materials anddelivery of complete products/services. Those organisations that dominate their industrysectors have demonstrated that successful operations management requires an enterprise-wide awareness and control of activities, and their interfaces with supporting functions.2. Module Delivery Suggested Learning Hours Lectures: Tutorials: Seminar: Laboratory: Private study: Total: 24 12 - - 114 150Content CLASS SUBJECT 1 Operations Management activities and models: Introduction to the field and context of Operations Management – case study. 2 Operations Management strategic objectives: the strategic role and objectives of operations, performance objectives – research case study and discussion. 3 Operations strategy: The content and process of operations strategy – research case study and discussion. 4 The deign of products and services: Process / product / service design. Research and provide examples of design. 5 Job design of products and services: Ergonomics, scientific management, work measurement – research case study and discussion. 6 Capacity planning and control: Volume / variety effect, choosing a capacity planning and control approach. 7 Supply chain management: Supply chain behaviour, types of relationships in a supply chain – research case study and discussion. 8 Lean operations and JIT: Lean philosophy, JIT techniques- research case study and discussion. 9 Quality: Specification, process control, sampling- SPC tools and techniques. 10 Project Management: Project planning and control process - research case study and discussion.
    • 11 Operational improvement: Approaches / techniques of improvement, failure and recovery - research case study and discussion. 12 Operational challenges: Environmental / social challenges - research case study and discussion.Course text –bookTEXT: Slack, M, Chambers, S, Johnstone, R (2007) Operations Management 5th ed.Prentice HallISBN-10: 140584700XISBN-13: 978-1405847001 1. Module AssessmentModule Learning OutcomesOn completion of this course, students should be able to:Knowledge and understanding1. Describe and explain the established principles of operations management.Intellectual Skills: 1. Evaluate and assess the application of operation management techniques to real life operations management problems. 2. Critically evaluate the role of operations management in business competitiveness. 3. Apply a range of operations management techniques to relatively complex cases and draw conclusions about operations management issues.Assessment Methods:Number, Type and Weighting of ElementExamination - 100%
    • Module Title: Information Systems and Organisations Level: IADB Credits 15Overview of the module:This module introduces participants to the subject of Information Systems and Technology(IS&T) in organisations, taking a broad management perspective. Students will demonstratean understanding of the current and future role of IS and information in modernorganisations, including an appreciation of social, cultural and political aspects that areimportant to successful adoption of technology.2. Module Delivery Suggested Learning Hours Lectures: Tutorials: Seminar: Laboratory: Private study: Total: 24 12 - - 114 150Contents CLASS SUBJECT 1 Organisations and Information Systems (IS). Data, information and knowledge. The importance of IS for organisations. 2 Social Context and Perspectives on IS. Social contexts within organisations, different perspectives, technology interaction with the organisation. 3 Internal IS, Enterprise Wide Systems. Evolution and classification of IS, information flows and enterprise wide systems. 4 External IS, Knowledge, CRM and e-Business. Managing knowledge, customers and external parties using IS. 5 Costs and Benefits of IS. Sources of cost and benefit, tangible and intangible factors, formal-rational evaluation. 6 Evaluation of IS. Balanced portfolio of IS, wider criteria for evaluating IS, organisational implications. 7 Cultural, Structural and Political aspects of IS. Culture and IS, how IS affect structure, central and local decision making, political aspects of IS. 8 People and IS, Interpretation. Human needs ,information ownership, legal and ethical issues. 9 People and IS, Virtuality and Control. Using IS for commitment and control, managing distributed work. 10 People and IS, Technology Acceptance. Technology acceptance and the socio-technical approach. 11 IS and Change. Implementing IS and the context of change, critical aspects of a project, understanding models of change.
    • 12 Stakeholder. Identifying and influencing stakeholders. Management.Indicative readingEssential Textbook: Boddy, D., Boonstra ,A., Kennedy, G. (2004) Managing InformationSystems 2nd ed. FT Prentice HallISBN-10: 0273686356ISBN-13: 978-0273686354OrBoddy, D., Boonstra ,A., Kennedy, G. (2008) Managing Information Systems 3rd ed. FTPrentice HallISBN-10: 0273716816ISBN-13: 978-02737168153. Module AssessmentModule Learning OutcomesOn completion of this module the student should be able to:Knowledge and understanding1. Describe and explain a range of information systems (IS) and technology and theirapplications.Intellectual Skills1. Identify and evaluate information system and technology possibilities within an organisation.2. Propose ways in which IS adoption can be achieved within the social context of an organisation.3. Demonstrate the ability to identify risks to successful adoption of IS and related human needs.Assessment Methods:Number, Type and Weighting of ElementExamination (Open Book) 100%
    • ESEI International Business School Barcelona www.esei.es info@esei.es Phone: +34 93 417 46 77ESEI International Business School Barcelonawww.esei.esinfo@esei.esPhone: +34 93 417 46 77