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Recruiting & Using Executive Volunteer
 

Recruiting & Using Executive Volunteer

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An introduction to recruiting and using skills based volunteers for nonprofit agencies. This presentation was developed for the 2009 Mental Health Corporations of America. Inc. Summer Conference.

An introduction to recruiting and using skills based volunteers for nonprofit agencies. This presentation was developed for the 2009 Mental Health Corporations of America. Inc. Summer Conference.

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  • Alison We will share some information with you but also do two exercises that will prepare you to make better use of skills based volunteers.
  • How can centers successfully tap into the professional skills of volunteers, particularly professionals with marketing and fund development expertise? At the end of this session you will be able to: 1) Identify factors important to a successful match with a skills-based volunteer 2) Assess your organization’s readiness to use highly skilled volunteers   3) Develop a scope of work for a SBV and 4) Identify sources of skills-based volunteers. The presenter is Nancy Long, Executive Director of the Executive Service of Washington. ESCWA is a member of the Executive Service Corps Affiliate Network, a nationwide network of nonprofit consulting organizations providing high quality, affordable consulting services, and other technical assistance to nonprofits. 
  • volunteers with specialized skills …pro-bono work …highly skilled volunteers
  • much of traditional volunteering asks volunteers to take a small part of a process and assist the organization by doing that part without necessarily providing the background and context for the work or giving the volunteer a say in what is done and how it is done. Skills based volunteers want to understand the work and have a say in how the work is done.
  • We need to change the way we think about volunteers Using skills- based volunteers is not a program but a strategy that needs Leadership from the top and Broad understanding an adoption throughout the organization You can engage SBV in project-based work or in an unpaid or stipended volunteer role. In both cases it is important that the volunteer is an active participant in designing how the work is done Agency describes the outcome Volunteer contributes to how the outcome is reached For most people it enhances their volunteer experience if their volunteer role is Paired with learning Done in a diverse and intergenerational environment
  • Some of the benefits of SBV: Access to needed management skills/expertise An outside perspective on strategic issues Helps solve organizational issues that staff are not able to take on because they do not have the skills/expertise or just do not have the time Volunteers serve as effective and often well connected ambassadors for the organization A deeper volunteer engagement often leads to deeper commitment to the organization and increased donations to the org. Boomer opportunity 57% say it's very important that they have work (paid and unpaid) that gives them a sense of purpose keeps them involved with people and helps them improve their communities
  • Fundraising Marketing & PR Accounting & Financial Services Planning & Org. Development Technology Human Resources Program development/evaluation Facilities planning and management
  • Atlantic Philanthropies initiative Funding to community foundations 30 + cities Understand the barriers to successful engagement of boomers Seattle project focused on skills based volunteers We identified 6 major problem areas or barriers We will focus on 4 of them today The first two are well understood by everyone in this room; Funders are providing very little support for volunteerism of any kind, particularly SBV or older adult engagement Volunteer management is underfunded and underdeveloped How many of your have volunteer managers?
  • Nancy The barriers we will focus on today are…. NFPs do not have a conceptual basis for understanding how to match people with substantive volunteer roles NFPs need to assess their readiness to use SBV and act to increase readiness. Need to learn to “contract” with volunteers NFPs need to tap into volunteer brokers
  • Nancy Lets talk about matchmaking There is no e-harmony for volunteers Yet matching a volunteer – especially a skills-based volunteer - into a role in an organization is every bit as complicated as hiring the right person for a job. And – when we try to fit square pegs in round holes what happens? Attrition Bad PR Lose donors
  • Nancy We felt we needed to get inside the match process and understand what needs to align for a good match to happen We developed this typology that looks at the two sides of a successful volunteer engagement First the volunteer… The parallel issues exist for the organization What are some of the volunteer values issues that can cause a match to succeed or fail? What are the organizational culture issues that need to be understood and discussed? What are some elements of how the volunteer wants to be engaged that an organization needs to understand? What issues related to the structure and benefits of a volunteer engagement are important to consider?
  • Nancy One person plays the role of the volunteer and chooses a volunteer identity One person plays the role of the agency and chooses and agency identity
  • Nancy Remember to think about all of these factors – do not move too quickly to the work to be done Centers- you need to understand what this volunteer is looking for and what they have to offer Volunteers – you need to determine whether the culture of the organization is a good match for you and if you can provide what they need.
  • Taproot
  • Nancy
  • Nancy Resources: beyond office, expense budget it means background info, information, access to staff/leadership, Cannot be done with perfect knowledge – do not want to crowd out discovery process, the opportunity to learn from an outside perspective etc. May need to re-define the scope as you go Accountability and evaluation – include the soft skills, culture fit, communications, trust We evaluate project outcomes and the communications skills of our volunteers including the ability to speak the organization’s language, doing what you say you will do, Most important: demonstrating appreciation for the organization’s strengths and achievements
  • Return to your partner Do not need to deal with timeline
  • Discussion to tease out the success characteristics – what matters? Doing what you say you will do Listening/ learning before judging Showing appreciation for the accomplishments of the organization
  • Nancy We realized that organizations needed some help in assessing their readiness to use SBV. Wanted to develop a tool that showed people where they were on the continuum and what improvement would look like Decided to develop it using the format of the Vol Management Audit developed by Susan J. Ellis Go through the assessment – break
  • Nancy We realized that organizations needed some help in assessing their readiness to use SBV. Wanted to develop a tool that showed people where they were on the continuum and what improvement would look like Decided to develop it using the format of the Vol Management Audit developed by Susan J. Ellis
  • Nancy We recognize that the process for successful engagement of SBV we have talked about can seem pretty overwhelming for most nonprofits Luckily there is a somewhat easier way that will meet some of the needs of organizations Use volunteer brokers Portals: a connector organization that helps an employer who has volunteers to deploy or an individual who wants to volunteer identify the right volunteering opportunity, often through the use of a website. Brokers: a connector organization that plays an active role in matching the volunteer with a community need, in some cases remaining involved to ensure that the volunteer relationship is working well and the community need is being met.
  • Nancy Vol matching process more efficient and effective for the volunteer and the organization. Source and develop opportunities. Can help an individual find a best match. Understand local needs or needs of specific sectors for certain types of volunteers. Know which organizations are working on specific local issues. Familiar with the intent of employers who are promoting volunteerism so they can identify and match employees with relevant opportunities. What are some examples of volunteer brokers in your community?
  • Templated process Teams of 6
  • Nancy We want to spend a few minutes talking about two demographic groups that are receiving a lot of attention I will talk about people over 50, particularly boomers And Alison will talk about her work with people in their 20s and 30s. 48% of working adults over 45 volunteer (AARP); Higher education = more volunteering Survey by Civic Ventures: 80% expect to work after 65 but 57% say it's very important that…
  • Alison

Recruiting & Using Executive Volunteer Recruiting & Using Executive Volunteer Presentation Transcript

  • Using Skills-Based Volunteers Nancy Long Executive Service Corps of Washington
  • Purpose
    • Provide tools and resources that help nonprofits successfully tap into the professional skills of volunteers…
    • ...and encourage companies to facilitate the engagement of their employees in skills-based roles.
  • Key Outcomes
    • At the end of this session you will be able to:
    • Identify factors important to a successful match with a skills based volunteer
    • Develop a scope of work for SBV
    • Identify sources of skills-based volunteers
    • Definition: Using the professional skills of volunteers to build organizational strength and increase nonprofit capacity.
    Skills-based Volunteerism
  • What’s different? “ You don’t need to know where you are going. Just keep walking.”
  • Reinvent Volunteerism
    • Individually based (not a program)
      • Project-based—Driven by scope of work
      • Unpaid (or stipended) staff role
    • Volunteer is an active participant
      • Agency describes the outcome
      • Volunteer contributes to how the outcome is reached
    • Enhanced experience if:
      • Paired with learning
      • Diverse/Intergenerational
  • What are some possible benefits of using SBV?
  • What professional skills might be useful to nonprofits?
  • W hat are the barriers? Results of the Community Experience Partnership Assessment
    • Philanthropy is providing very little support for volunteerism of any kind, particularly SBV or older adult engagement
    • Volunteer management is underfunded and underdeveloped
  • Focus for Today
    • NFPs do not understand how to match people
    • NFPs need to assess readiness to use SBV
    • Need to learn to “contract” with volunteers
    • NFPs need to tap into volunteer brokers
  • Step #1: Matching Volunteers
    • Square peg in a round hole?
    • Determining a good “fit”
  • Typology for Matching Volunteer Requirements with Organizational Needs Volunteer Organization Volunteer’s values about who they want to help Focus/mission; staff/board diversity; who is served Volunteer’s values about workplace culture Organizational culture Volunteer’s preferences about using/developing their skills Organizational needs (what needs to be done; what expertise is needed) Volunteer’s preferences about the structure and benefits of a volunteer opportunity Structure and benefits of the volunteer opportunity
  • Typology Exercise
    • Choose a partner
    • One plays the role of the volunteer
    • One plays the role of the organization
    • Read the description of the nonprofit’s project and the profile of the volunteer and attempt to determine if there is a good match
  • Typology for Matching Volunteer Requirements with Organizational Needs Volunteer Organization Volunteer’s values about who they want to help Focus/mission; staff/board diversity; who is served Volunteer’s values about workplace culture Organizational culture Volunteer’s preferences about using/developing their skills Organizational needs (what needs to be done what expertise is needed) Volunteer’s preferences about the structure and benefits of a volunteer opportunity Structure and benefits of the volunteer opportunity
  • Challenge: Cross walking skills
    • From the corporate to…
    • the nonprofit sector
  • Pro Bono Action Tank www.probonoactiontank.org
    • Competencies Map
      • A catalog mapping needs to expertise  
      • 76 opportunities and the occupations that can have the needed competencies
      • Select
        • By project
        • By occupation
  • Select By Project
    • Select a category : Fundraising
    • Select a project: Fundraising Management Process
    • A fundraising management process project helps a nonprofit define a process for managing fundraising activities to increase efficiency, effectiveness and predictability.
  • Project Viability
    • Pro Bono Project Viability :
    • Time Sensitivity Risk
    • Scope Creep Risk
    • Sector Knowledge Risk
    • Relevant Occupations
    • General and Operations Managers
    • General and Operations Managers
    • 1,663,280 potential pro bono consultants
    • Plan, direct, or coordinate the operations of companies/ organizations. Duties and responsibilities include formulating policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human resources. Include owners and managers who head small business establishments whose duties are primarily managerial.
  • Step #2: Contracting with SBV
    • Defining the project
      • Scope of Work (what, how, to what end?)
      • Deliverables (products/outcomes)
      • Timeline
      • Resources needed
      • Accountability/Evaluation process
  • Contracting with SBV
    • Scope of work:
      • Problem to be solved
      • What will be done/ by when
      • Generally how it will be done
      • Where will the resources come from
    • Deliverables
      • Products of the work, incl. interim products
      • Outcomes
    • Accountability/Evaluation
  • Contracting Exercise
    • Develop a scope of work for role you defined
      • Problem to be solved
      • What will be done
      • Generally how it will be done
      • Where will the resources come from
    • Develop a list of deliverables
      • Products
      • Outcomes
  • Define what does success looks like?
    • How will you evaluate success of the match?
    • On what basis will you judge the volunteer?
    • Define desired behaviors and the process for assessing if those desired behaviors are being displayed
  • Assessing Readiness for SBV Supplement to the Volunteer Management Audit (Energize Inc./Susan Ellis) Sample standard #1:We insure that specialized volunteers are given the staff support and resources needed to accomplish their projects.
  • Assessing Readiness Sample standard #2: The volunteer program is staffed to meet the increased demands of managing skilled volunteers Staff do not have time to work with skilled volunteers. No one is assigned the primary responsibility of managing skilled volunteers.
    • Want an easier way to efficiently and effectively use skills based volunteers?
      • … .Use Volunteer Brokers!
  • What is a volunteer broker?
    • A 'volunteer broker' matches the volunteer with a community need.
    • The advantages of brokers are:
      • More efficient for vol and org
      • Able to identify broad array of opportunities
      • Able to match from a broad pool of vol
      • Understand sector-specific needs
      • Understand employer goals
  • WAACO
    • Washington Attorneys Assisting Community Organizations
    • www.waaco.org
    • Pro bono lawyers
  • Taproot Foundation Services
    • Marketing (annual report, brochure)
    • Information Technology (Database, website)
    • Strategic Management
    • Leadership Development and Strategic HR
  • Executive Service Corps of WA
    • Capacity building
      • Consulting services (not legal/tech)
      • Coaches, Trainers, Executive Advisors
      • Financial Fitness, Emergency Planning
    • All ages: 70% in workforce; 30% retired
    • 250 Professionals from business, education, nonprofit, government
  • Other Brokers
    • NPower - technology volunteers
    • Corporate Volunteer Programs that do the engagement management
    • Volunteer Centers that do the engagement management.
  • Working with SBV over 50
    • 10,000 people turn 60 each day
    • King County - 27% of the population
    • Highly educated population = increased volunteerism
    • 48% of working adults over 45 are already volunteers
  • The experience gain
    • Few expect traditional retirement: 80% plan to work beyond 65…
    • … but 57% say it's very important that they have work (paid and unpaid) that
      • gives them a sense of purpose
      • keeps them involved with people
      • and helps them improve their communities
  • Working with SBV in their 20s/30s
    • Give options
    • Be flexible and clear about expectations
    • Engage in smaller projects to build commitment
    • Be open to how the work gets done
    • Appreciate their technology knowledge and experience
  • Discussion
    • Do you feel more prepared to work with SBV?
    • What are the biggest barriers to your organization using SBVs?
  • Contact Information
    • Nancy Long, Executive Director,
    • Executive Service Corps of Washington
    • [email_address] 206.682.6704
    • www.escwa.org