Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
                  Final Programme & Abstract Book                                               
                                                                2
Table of Contents  Committees  ..............................................................................................
                                                                4
Committees   Technical and Organising Committee Chair: N. Peccia – European Space Operations Centre (ESA/ESOC)  Co‐chair: ...
                                                                6
                                                       Programme                                                           7
Tuesday 10 May 2011  08:15       Registration  09:00       Welcome and General Address  09:10       Logistics for the 2 da...
The programme on this afternoon runs in parallel session, series A & B, as noted.  Parallel Session (A) 3 ‐ Architectures ...
Wednesday 11 May 2011  The programme on this day runs in parallel session, series A & B, as noted.  Parallel Session (A) 7...
Parallel Session (B) 11 – System Technology  Chair: N. Peccia  09:00       SOA4GDS: Evaluating the Suitability of Emerging...
                               12
Posters  Recent Applications of Procedure Automation.........................................................................
Mission Automation at ESOC; finding success with an end‐to‐end approach. ....................................................
 Flexplan, the Adaptable System for Mission Planning & Scheduling ...........................................................
                                                      16
Abstracts                                                                       Current Trends and Outlook of Future Chall...
system  architecture  simple.  The  future  systems  shall                    GSOC Ground Segment Challenges  allow  reuse...
projects  a  target  mission  already  has  been                                                                        id...
BASyS: Neo Satellite Database Management System                    reporting,  database  configuration  control,  import, ...
    Web based MMI to allow zero deployment and               robotic  missions  implementing  telepresence  like  DEOS   ...
European Technology Harmonisation on Ground                    immediately  after  ESAW.  The  presentation  will  give  a...
CCSDS  MO  standard.  Fully  standardised,  adaptable,                Geographic  Information  System  (GIS)  in  order  ...
interfaces to the Payload and providing automated Test            station  engineers.  The  driving  factor  behind  the s...
improvements  in  the  functionality  of  the  system,  but        remaining  aligned  to  the  "core"  product  developme...
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts

1,572

Published on

The European Ground System Architecture Workshop (ESAW) 2011 was held at ESOC, Darmstadt, Germany, 10-11 May 2011. With over 270 participants from European and American space agencies, telecommunication operators, satellite primes, European institutes and universities, European industry and companies from Argentina, Canada, Croatia, Japan, Thailand, Turkey and the USA, the workshop was a great success. Access all presentation PDFs via http://www.egos.esa.int/portal/egos-web/others/Events/Workshop/esaw-2011.html

Published in: Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,572
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "ESA/ESOC - ESAW 2011 - Abstracts"

  1. 1.                Final Programme & Abstract Book                       
  2. 2.                                                              2
  3. 3. Table of Contents  Committees  ..........................................................................................................................................5 Programme   10 May 2011 ................................................................................................................................8   11 May 2011 ..............................................................................................................................10   Poster Session (running parallel to full programme) ................................................................13 Abstracts  ........................................................................................................................................17 Biographies (oral presenters, in alphabetical order) .............................................................................53                                         3
  4. 4.                                                              4
  5. 5. Committees   Technical and Organising Committee Chair: N. Peccia – European Space Operations Centre (ESA/ESOC)  Co‐chair: M. Pecchioli ‐ European Space Operations Centre (ESA/ESOC)   Committee Members J. Eggleston – European Space Operations Centre (ESA/ESOC) M. Merri – European Space Operations Centre (ESA/ESOC) A. Slade – European Space Operations Centre (ESA/ESOC)                                            5
  6. 6.                                                              6
  7. 7.             Programme                                           7
  8. 8. Tuesday 10 May 2011  08:15  Registration  09:00  Welcome and General Address  09:10  Logistics for the 2 days  Plenary Session 1 ‐ Institutional View and GSAW  Chair: N. Peccia  09:20  ESOC’s Vision of the future   N. Peccia   ESA/ESOC 09:30    The European Ground System‐Common Core Initiative       Pecchioli, M.       ESA, (GERMANY) 09:55   Future Evolution of Mission Data Systems      Merri, M       ESA, (GERMANY) 10:20    GSAW History and future trends      Baldeston, D.       Aerospace Corporation  10:45  Coffee Break with Poster/Demo Sessions Plenary Session 2 – Institutional View  Chair: M. Merri  11:15    Current Trends and Outlook of Future Challenges in Mission Operations @ GSOC............................................... 17      Braun, A.       Deutsches Zentrum für Luft‐ und Raumfahrt e.V., (GERMANY) 11:40    ASI vision on future Ground Control System Software      Ibba, R.       ASI, (ITALY) 12:05    Building the Ground Data System for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Project –     The Launch/Cuise/EDL System................................................................................................................................ 17      Dehghani, N.       Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, NASA, (UNITED STATES) 12:30  Lunch Break with Poster/Demo Sessions           8
  9. 9. The programme on this afternoon runs in parallel session, series A & B, as noted.  Parallel Session (A) 3 ‐ Architectures  Chais: M. Pecchioli  14:00     Architecture Governance........................................................................................................................................ 17      Kolar, M.       JPL, (UNITED STATES) 14:25     Creating an Architecture Roadmap for Harmonizing Legacy Ground Systems....................................................... 17      Campbell, A ; Webber, D ; Benator, S       The Aerospace Corporation, (UNITED STATES) 14:50    Thales Alenia Space vision on future Ground Control System Software ................................................................ 17      Schmerber, P‐Y. 1; Chiroli, P. 2    1   Thales Alenia Space, (FRANCE); 2Thales Alenia Space, (ITALY) 15:15    CS vison on Ground Software Systems      DHoine, S.       CS  15:40  Coffee Break with Poster/Demo Sessions   Parallel Session (A) 4 ‐ Architectures  Chair: M. Spada  16:25     Astrium Space Transportation strategy for Ground Data Systems  ........................................................................ 18      Brauer, Uwe       EADS Astrium, (GERMANY) 16:50    GSOC Ground Segment Challenges......................................................................................................................... 18      Kozlowski, R.       DLR / GSOC, (GERMANY)  Parallel Session (B) 5 – Operations Preparation and Automation  Chair: J. Eggleston  14:00    Next Generation of Spacecraft Reference Database at Astrium ........................................................................... 19      Eisenmann, H. 1; Cazenave, C. 2    1   Astrium Satellites, (GERMANY); 2Astrium Satellites, (FRANCE) 14:25    BASyS: Neo Satellite Database Management System............................................................................................. 20      Garzón, H.       GMV, (SPAIN) 14:50    Mission Automation System for the International Space Innovation Centre at Harwell ....................................... 20      Roveda, F. 1; Kay, R. 1; Raper, I. 2    1   Logica Deutschland GmbH & Co.KG, (GERMANY); 2Astrium Ltd., (UNITED KINGDOM) 15:15    Ground Segment Autonomy: A Revised Approach................................................................................................. 21      Mueller, H. ; Stoetzel, H. ; Plura, M. ; Lampka, R. ; Foutou, F. ; Henke, M.       VCS AG, (GERMANY)  15:40  Coffee Break with Poster/Demo Sessions   Parallel Session (B) 6 ‐ Operations Preparation and Automation  Chair: M. Di Giulio  16:25    How is automation of satellite operations progressing at SES ?      Morelli , G.       SES‐AStra, (‐ Not specified ‐) 16:50    Inmarsat: Automation of Satellite and Ground Operations ................................................................................... 21      Rossetti, A ; Dickinson, M ; Sansone, C       Inmarsat, (UNITED KINGDOM) 17:45  Facilities Tour 18:30  Social Event   9
  10. 10. Wednesday 11 May 2011  The programme on this day runs in parallel session, series A & B, as noted.  Parallel Session (A) 7 ‐ Architectures  Chais: A. Ercolani  09:25    European Technology Harmonisation on Ground Software Systems: Update of Reference Architecture ............ 22      Reid, S. 1; Pearson, S. 1; Davies, K. 2; Carvalho, B. 3    1   Rhea System S.A., (BELGIUM); 2TERMA, (GERMANY); 3Critical Software, (PORTUGAL) 09:50    CNES Control Centre mock‐up : an evaluation of a standard SOA architecture..................................................... 22      Bornuat, P. 1; Cros, P‐A. 1; Pipo, C. 1; Anadon, M‐L. 2; Gelie, P. 2    1   CS Systèmes d’Information, (FRANCE); 2CNES, (FRANCE) 10:15    NOSYCA: the New Operational System for the control of Aerostats...................................................................... 23      Nouvellon, S.       Capgemini, (FRANCE)  10:45  Coffee Break with Poster/Demo Sessions  Parallel Session (A) 8 ‐ Architectures  Chair: D. Guerrucci  11:15    Ten Galileo FOC Payload EGSE Systems – Challenges in Design, MAIT and Schedule ............................................ 23      Kubr, H. ; Mader, W. ; Unfried, C.       Siemens AG Österreich, (AUSTRIA) 11:40    GSMC ‐ Ground Station Monitoring & Control ....................................................................................................... 24      Riccio, F. 1; Lannes, C. 2    1   Logica Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG, (GERMANY); 2 ESA/ESOC, (GERMANY) 12:05    Evolution of FEC architecture ................................................................................................................................. 24      Fernandez‐Ranada, I 1; Fuentes, A 1; Perez, R 1; Droll, P 2    1   TCP Sistemas e Ingeniería, (SPAIN); 2ESA/ESOC, (GERMANY)  12:30  Lunch Break with Poster/Demo Sessions  Parallel Session (A) 9 ‐ Commercialization  Chair: J. Eggleston  14:00    Exploiting ESOC infrastructure over the long term................................................................................................. 25      Patrick, R       Terma A/S, (DENMARK) 14:25    Satellite Control Systems Provision and Maintenance Choices.............................................................................. 25      Tortosa, M.       Eutelsat, (FRANCE) 14:50    Ground Station Network for Micro/Nanosatellite Operation................................................................................. 25  1 2 1     Kurahara, N.  ; Shirasaka, S.  ; Nakasuka, S.      1 2   University of Tokyo, (JAPAN);  Keio University, (JAPAN)  Parallel Session (A) 10 ‐ Security  Chair: N. Peccia  15:15    Development of SODAs for Improving Efficiency and Security for Satellite Control .............................................. 26      Techavijit, P. ; Sirikhant, A. ; Detpon, A. ; Tongpan, J.       Geo‐Informatics and Space Technology Development Agency (GISTDA), (THAILAND)  15:40  Coffee Break with Poster/Demo Sessions   16:00    Ground Segment Security: light and shade ............................................................................................................ 26      Vivero, J       GMV, (SPAIN) 16:25    Automated Computer Network Defence................................................................................................................ 27      Wiemer, D.       Defence R&D Canada, (CANADA)     10
  11. 11. Parallel Session (B) 11 – System Technology  Chair: N. Peccia  09:00    SOA4GDS: Evaluating the Suitability of Emerging Service based Technologies in Ground Data Systems .............. 27      Parsons, P 1; Walsh, A 2    1   The Server Labs, (SPAIN); 2VEGA, (GERMANY) 09:25    Modern Frameworks ‐ The Fantastic Four.............................................................................................................. 28      Villemos, GV ; James, S. ; Doyle, M. ; Klug, J.       Logica, (GERMANY) 09:50    Leveraging EGOS User Desktop and hifly® to evolve SCOS‐2000 ........................................................................... 29      Casas, N ; Estévez, C       GMV, (SPAIN) 10:15   Improve Usability of Graphical User Interfaces with New Technologies in Ground Centre Software ................... 29     Marty, S. 1; Volland, S. 1; Cros, P‐A. 1; Bornuat, P. 1; Anadon, M‐L. 2; Gelie, P. 2    1   CS Systèmes d’Information, (FRANCE); 2CNES, (FRANCE)  10:45  Coffee Break with Poster/Demo Sessions  Parallel Session (B) 12 – System Technology  Chair: C. Haddow  11:15    Telemetry Archiving: How To Optimise Storage Efficiency, Retrieval Speed And Real‐Time Performance ........... 30      Kumpf, C. ; Foweraker, R.       MakaluMedia GmbH, (GERMANY) 11:40    Towards a high performance LEON/GRLIB Emulator ............................................................................................. 30      Marchesi, J.E.       Terma GmbH, (GERMANY) 12:05   A Netpdl Based Prototype Implementation of Galileo Attitude Orbit Control System Scoe Controller,     and an Overview of Netpdl Utilization in Network Ground Software Components............................................... 30     Bertoli, A. 1; Risso, F. 2    1   Carlo Gavazzi Space, (ITALY); 2Politecnico of Turin, (ITALY)  12:30  Lunch Break with Poster/Demo Sessions  14:00    Integrated Test Concept and Test Automation for Aerospace Projects ................................................................. 31     Hofmann, J.       T‐Systems, (GERMANY)  Parallel Session (B) 13 – Standards  Chair: M. Merri  14:25     CCSDS Mission Operations Services ‐ Current Status ............................................................................................. 32     Cooper, S ; Thompson, R       SciSys, (UNITED KINGDOM) 14:50    Where do we stand with CCSDS SM&C at CNES ? .................................................................................................. 32     Poupart, E. ; Pasquier, H.       CNES ‐ Centre Spatial de Toulouse, (FRANCE) 15:15    Space Internetworking and DTN Prototyping: Evolutions in the Space Communications Architecture ................ 33      Fowell, S 1; Wheeler, S 1; Stanton, D 2; Farrell, S 3; Taylor, C 4; Viana Sanchez, A 4    1   SciSys UK Ltd, (UNITED KINGDOM); 2Keltik Ltd, (UNITED KINGDOM); 3Tolerant Networks Ltd, (IRELAND); 4ESA   ESTEC, (NETHERLANDS)  15:40  Coffee Break with Poster/Demo Sessions   16:00    Space Data Routers for Exploiting Space DATA ...................................................................................................... 34      Goetzelmann, M. 1; Tsaoussidis, V. 2; Diamantopoulos, S. 2; Amanatidis , T. 3; Daglis , I. 4; Ghita, B. 5    1   VEGA Space GmbH, (GERMANY); 2Democritus University of Thrace, (GREECE); 3Space Internetworks, (GREECE);  4  National Observatory of Athens, (GREECE); 5University of Plymouth, (UNITED KINGDOM) 16:25    XTCE tailoring for ESA ............................................................................................................................................. 35      del Rey, I.       GMV, (SPAIN)   11
  12. 12.                             12
  13. 13. Posters  Recent Applications of Procedure Automation..................................................................................................................... 35 Blake, R    SciSys, (UNITED KINGDOM)     MUSE ‐ Multi‐Satellite Environnent ...................................................................................................................................... 36 Bonnafous, V. ; Cruz, D.    Capgemini, (FRANCE)  Introduction to the Architecture Centric Design Method..................................................................................................... 36 Brito, N. 1; Lattanze, A. J. 2   1 University of Coimbra, (PORTUGAL); 2Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University, (UNITED STATES)  OCP: Bringing Automation to Operational Control Centers.................................................................................................. 37 Capdevielle, E. ; Berthon, JC.    Capgemini, (FRANCE)  A Dedicated Space Surveillance Optical Network Cooperates with Radar to assure LEO Debris Catalogue build up  and Maintenance  ................................................................................................................................................................. 37  1 1 2 3 3 4 5Cibin, L  ; Chiarini, M  ; Besso, P  ; Milani, A  ; Bernardi, F  ; Ragazzoni, R  ; Rossi, A     1 CGS S.p.A., (ITALY);  ESOC, (GERMANY);  Dipartimento di Matematica UNIPI, (ITALY); 4INAF, (ITALY); 5IFAC‐CNR, (ITALY)  2 3 ESTRACK Support for CCSDS Space Communication Cross Support Service Management .................................................. 38 Dreihahn, H. 1; Unal, M. 1; Hoffmann, A. 2   1 ESA/ESOC, (GERMANY); 2VEGA Space GmbH, (GERMANY)  Evolving a Commercial Satellite Control Center toward a SOA: Lessons Learnt................................................................... 38 Estévez Martín, C. ; Casas Manzanares, N.    GMV, (SPAIN)  PlanEO    .................................................................................................................................................................. 39 Fernandez Garcia, A.J. ; Fernandez, C.    Deimos Imaging S.L., (SPAIN)  Architecture of the Telemetry Data Management System SpaceMaster ............................................................................. 39  1 1 1 2 2 2Dr. Thelen, A.  ; Schoenig, S.  ; Koerver, W.  ; Dr. Fischer, H.  ; Dr. Sous, S.  ; Dr. Willnecker, R.     1 2 S.E.A. Datentechnik GmbH, (GERMANY);  DLR‐MUSC, (GERMANY)  Mars Express/MARSIS Ground System Architecture. A Pioneer ESA Space Mission: Lessons Learned for the Future ........ 40 Giuppi, S. ; Orosei, R. ; Noschese, R. ; Cartacci, M. ; Cicchetti, A.    INAF/IFSI, (ITALY)  Operations Planning for the Galileo Constellation................................................................................................................ 40 Hall, S ; Hall, Stewart    SciSys UK Ltd, (UNITED KINGDOM)  ARES ‐ Efficient SW Integration and Reuse supported by an Agile Project Management Approach.................................... 41 Hauke, A. 1; Santos, R. 2; Unfried, C. 1   1 Siemens AG Österreich, (AUSTRIA); 2ESA/ESOC, (GERMANY)  Demonstration of the EGOS Data Dissemination System (EDDS) ......................................................................................... 41 Hawkshaw, M 1; Santos, R 2   1 Logica, (GERMANY); 2ESA, (GERMANY)  Use of Scrum in practice on the EGOS Data Dissemination System (EDDS).......................................................................... 42 Hawkshaw, M 1; Santos, R 2   1 Logica, (GERMANY); 2ESA, (GERMANY)     13
  14. 14. Mission Automation at ESOC; finding success with an end‐to‐end approach. ..................................................................... 42 Heinen, W. ; Reid, S. ; Pearson, S.    Rhea System S.A., (BELGIUM)  Architectures for Integrated Satellite and Ground Operations ............................................................................................ 42 Honold, P. ; Castrillo, I.    GMV, (SPAIN)  Optimizing Communication Satellite Transponders Operation and Power Consumption with smartHz ............................. 43 Honold, P. ; Godino, E.    GMV, (SPAIN)  Fast Engineering Archives providing a new future for Mission Analysis............................................................................... 44 James, S. ; Pitaev, A.    Logica Deutschland GmbH & Co.KG, (GERMANY)  Federated System Architecture for Space Weather Services ............................................................................................... 44 Lawrence, Gareth    Rhea System S.A., (BELGIUM)  A Collaborative Electronic Logbook for Satellite Operations at Eutelsat .............................................................................. 44 Louro, N. ; Ronsiek, S. ; Foweraker, R.    MakaluMedia GmbH, (GERMANY)  PlanetExpl: a Framework for the Science and Engineering Assessment of Exploration Missions ........................................ 45 Luengo, O. 1; Kowalczyk, A. 2; Pantoquilho, M. 2   1 GMV, (SPAIN); 2ESA, (GERMANY)  Building an Open‐Source Community Around Flight dynamics Ground Systems ................................................................. 45 Maisonobe, L. ; Fernandez‐Martin, Ch.    CS SI, (FRANCE)  Use of Open Architecture Middleware in the Satellite Ground Segment Domain. Data Distribution Service ..................... 46 Naranjo, H.    GMV, (SPAIN)  Can multi‐agent technology be applied to Space Mission Applications ?............................................................................. 46  1 2 1 3 Ocon, J.  ; Wijnands, Q.  ; Sanchez, A. M.  ; Cesta, A.     1 2 3 GMV, (SPAIN);  ESA, (NETHERLANDS);  ISTC/CNR, (ITALY)  Cloud Data Systems: Applying the Cloud in ESA Ground Data Systems................................................................................ 47 Parsons, P ; Olias, A    The Server Labs, (SPAIN)  GABIS: a Generic Build System for GSI applications.............................................................................................................. 48  1 2Penataro, R  ; Zimmer, T     1 GMV Aerospace and Defence, (SPAIN); 2ESA, (GERMANY)  BIRF: How to Improve Software Projects Efficiency and Control using Business Intelligence .............................................. 48 Prieto, JF 1; Marques, P 2; Vieira, M 2; Widegård, K 3; Navarro, V 3   1 ISFreelance, (SPAIN); 2University of Coimbra, (PORTUGAL); 3ESA‐ESOC, (GERMANY)  SpaceMaster Overview of a Telemetry Data Management System ..................................................................................... 49 Schoenig, S. 1; Dr. Fischer, H.H. 2; Koerver, W. 2; Dr. Sous, S. 2; Dr. Thelen, A. 1; Dr. Willnecker, R. 2   1 S.E.A. Datentechnik GmbH, (GERMANY); 2DLR‐MUSC, (GERMANY)  The Innovative Rover Operations Concepts ‐ Autonomous Planning (IRONCAP) ‐ Science and Engineering Planning for Rover Operations .................................................................................................................................................................. 49 Steel, R. ; Hoffmann, A. ; Niezette, M.    VEGA, (GERMANY)  14
  15. 15.  Flexplan, the Adaptable System for Mission Planning & Scheduling .................................................................................... 50 Tejo, J. 1; Barnoy, A. 2; Pereda, M. 1   1 GMV Aerospace And Defence, (SPAIN); 2GMV Space Systems Inc, (UNITED STATES)  The GNSS Advanced Monitoring Element (GAME) Core....................................................................................................... 50 Villemos, G ; Biamonti, D. ; Edwards, D    Logica, (GERMANY)  Supporting the Management of Mission Operational Knowledge ‐ a Case Study using Mars Express ................................ 51  1 2 1 1Villemos, G  ; Shaw, M  ; Doyle, M.  ; van Zetten, P     1 2 Logica, (GERMANY);  Mars Express OPS‐OPM, Consultant Vega Space GmbH, (GERMANY)  Standardisation of Reprocessing Architectures for Future Ground Segments ..................................................................... 51 Williams, I. ; Evens, P. ; Steven, J.    Logica Deutschland GmbH & Co.KG, (GERMANY)  Cloud and Grid Technologies in Ground Segments............................................................................................................... 51 Williams, I. ; Evens, P. ; James, S.    Logica Deutschland GmbH & Co.KG, (GERMANY)                                          15
  16. 16.                                                    16
  17. 17. Abstracts    Current Trends and Outlook of Future Challenges in  with these architecture standards and design patterns?  Mission Operations @ GSOC   This  presentation  discusses  the  importance  of  Braun, A.  Architecture  Governance,  the  essential  elements  for  Deutsches Zentrum für Luft‐ und Raumfahrt e.V.,  practicing  governance,  and  how  governance  is  an  GERMANY  effective way to help insure architecture modernization  efforts  are  infused  into  systems  that  cross  ownership Past  and  recent  developments  in  operations  concept  boundaries in a manner that provides maximum benefit and  organizational  structures  at  DLR/GSOC  are  shown.  while managing risk and cost.  Commercialisation  of  space‐flight  has  induced  cost pressure.  An  attempt  is  made  to  deduce  from  current  **************** studies  to  future  scenarios.  Standardization  is  a  must. New  technologies,  still  in  experimental  stage,  have  Creating an Architecture Roadmap for Harmonizing potential  to  mean  qualitative  changes  of  future  Legacy Ground Systems  operations.   Campbell, A; Webber, D; Benator, S  The Aerospace Corporation, UNITED STATES  ****************  A  number  of  spacecraft  ground  systems  that  support Building the Ground Data System for the Mars Science  our  customers  have  been  in  existence  for  several  Laboratory (MSL) Project – The Launch/Cuise/EDL  decades.  In  many  cases,  there  are  tens  to  hundreds  of  System   systems supporting various space applications, many of  Dehghani, N.  them  based  on  legacy  software,  commercial  software,  Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Caltech, NASA, UNITED  and  often  unique  hardware.  The  challenge  is  to  define  STATES  roadmaps  to  harmonize  these  legacy  ground  systems,  modernizing  and  improving  commonality  and Presentation  describes  experiences/challenges  in  integration,  while  insuring  that  these  systems  can developing  the  GDS  for  support  of  Launch  at  Kennedy  continue  to  execute  their  unique  space  missions  and Space  Center,  and  Cruise  of  the  MSL  to  Mars.  A  expand to handle additional missions. The presentation description  of  MSL  and  science  objectives  is  provided.  will discuss the creation of an architectural roadmap to Main segment provides an overview of GDS architecture  address  modernizing  ground  systems,  harmonizing  the and enhancements based on experiences during system  systems  for  better  commonality  and  data  sharing,  and tests.  System  is  readied  to  support  launch  at  KSC,  and  interfacing with new systems that are being acquired by Launch/Cruise phases of MSL.   the  government.  The  presentation  will  include  discussion on a range of topics relevant to the roadmap: MSL  is  launched  in  November  2011.  After  7  months  of cruise, an autonomous EDL is executed landing on a pre‐  Vision and Goals selected area on Mars in August 2012. The GDS provides   Challenges new  architecture  that  is  used  by  MSL  as  its  first  user.   Creating  the  business  case  for  modernizing  those The  new  architecture  provides  opportunities  that  did  systems not exist in the legacy system. Among them are means   Lessons learned of  monitoring  and,  to  some  extent,  controlling  ATLO   Data exchange and sharing functions  from  remote  sites.  Remote  sites  are  defined   Security considerations as sites reachable via a local area network as well as via   Software approaches and tools wide  area  networks  spanning  long  distance   Organizational considerations geographical areas.    Interoperability and standards   ****************  ****************  Architecture Governance   Thales Alenia Space vision on future Ground Control  Kolar, M.  System Software   JPL, UNITED STATES  Schmerber, P‐Y.1; Chiroli, P.2  1 Thales Alenia Space, FRANCE; 2Thales Alenia Space, In  order  to  reduce  development  costs  while  ITALY simultaneously  helping  to  ensure  mission  success,  the Jet  Propulsion  Laboratory  has  recognized  that  a  well  Todays  space  market  is  driven  by  costs,  and  by  the defined  architecture  and  set  of  re‐usable  design  reduction  of  non  quality  costs  on  space  programs. patterns  are  essential.  But  how  do  space  agencies  go  Software  reuse  is  the  key  in  cost  reduction  and  quality about  ensuring  that  their  many  projects  are  compliant  improvement,  specially  when  it  allows  to  keep  the  17
  18. 18. system  architecture  simple.  The  future  systems  shall  GSOC Ground Segment Challenges  allow  reuse  of  software  components  accross  projects,  Kozlowski, R. accross satellite development and operation teams, and  DLR / GSOC, GERMANY accross companies in Europe. The user is at the heart of todays  successful  software  applications,  and  we  belive  The  Ground  System  as  it  is  managed  by  the  GSOC that the best software solution for tomorrow should be  department  Communications  and  Ground  Stations flexible  enough  to  adapt  to  the  different  needs  of  its  covers  the  IT  service  of  all  voice  ,  video  and  data users,  including  the  yet  unknown  future  needs  of  the  systems  and  the  whole  complex  of  the  Weilheim evolving users. In addition, the future system should be  Antenna Ground Stations. The projects for which all the open  source,  as  this  is  already  a  requirement  of  the  services  are  provided  are  the  Human  Spaceflight majority of users that want to keep the possibility of an  Projects Columbus Control Centre / ATV‐CC support and independant  software  maintenance  during  their  long  in parallel the satellite projects at GSOC have a huge set lived  programs.  To  keep  architecture  simple,  and  of requirements on the Ground System.  maximize  software  reuse,  the  future  system  will  be service  based  e.g  made  of  loosely  coupled  software  FOR GSOC THE FOLLOWING PROJECTS ARE PRESENTED:  components working together with interactions defined by the function provided, independently from the actual   M&C  Antenna  Ground  Station  SpACE implementation.  Relying  on  open  source  frameworks  DLR  has  implemented  a  new  antenna  ground for  service  based  components  offer  in  addition  station  M&C  Framework  for  the  Weilheim advantages  for  local  Security  implementation,  high  antennas.  It  will  be  the  M&C  software  for  the availability deployments, and smooth system scaling.   existing  3  S‐Band  antennas,  the  Ku‐Band  antenna  and  the  30  meter  dish.  Further  it  will  be  used  for  ****************  the  upcoming  Ka‐Band  antenna  and  the  EDRS  project.  The  software  is  based  on  open  and  Astrium Space Transportation strategy for Ground  standard  technologies  like  C++,  the  ACE  Data Systems   communications  framework,  Graphical  User  Brauer, Uwe  Interface  Qt.  The  platforms  supported  are  SuSE  EADS Astrium, GERMANY  Enterprise  Linux,  Sun  Solaris  and  Windows.  The  M&C  Framework  was  built  by  DLR  staff  and  now Astrium ST has started in 2008 an internal initiative for a  after  successful  testing,  being  implemented  at  the new  ground  software  platform  called  Advanced  Weilheim  Ground  Station.  It  is  planned  that  the Integration and Test Services (AITS) as follow‐on for the  new  M&C  system  will  be  operational  by  mid  of Common  Ground  System  (CGS)  system.  CGS  was  2011.  developed  with  ESA  in  the  context  of  the  Columbus   Virtualisation program  (EMCS)  and  then  reused  for  ATV  and  certain  Since  more than  3 years  DLR  is  using  virtualisation Satellite  EGSE  (e.g.  SWARM,  GOCE).  AITS  shall  be  the  technology  within  the  GSOC  control  center.  Since future  standard  software  platform  for  projects  &  about  2  years  the  first  network  services  (e.g.  DNS, products  in  Astrium  ST  (e.g.  launchers,  space  vehicles,  FTP‐server,  Proxies)  in  the  real  time  environment robotics or on equipment level). AITS focus for the next  have  been  virtualised.  The  motivation  are years will be in the area of EGSE but a reuse as mission  independence  of  hardware  and  software control  system  should  be  in  principal  possible.  AITS  limitations,  infra  structure  cost project is a trans‐national project between German and  reductions/optimizations  and  energy  savings.  In France  ST  units.  We  have  agreed  in  Astrium  ST  on  a  addition  to  server  virtualization  the  next  step  at common software system specification end of 2009 and  GSOC  is  to  introduce  this  technology  in  the  multi worked  in  2010  on  demonstrators  for  different  use  mission control rooms with desktop virtualization.  cases  in  launcher  EGSE  domain  and  performed   Columbus  Decentralised  Ground  Operations architectural  prototyping.  Up  to  now  AITS  was  fully  The  European  decentralized  operations  concept funded by own funds but in parallel an AITS technology  enables  all  participating  countries  to  establish  a development  project  in  ESA  GSTP  program  is  planned  transnational  centre  of  competence  that  actively with  support  from  Germany,  Denmark,  Ireland,  cooperates  in  European  participation  to  the Netherlands and Austria. The presentation shall give an  International  Space  Station  (ISS).  Operating  this overview  of  AITS  project  status  and  software  Ground  Segment  is  a  significant  challenge  for  the architecture.   Ground Operations Team at Col‐CC, not only due to  the vast number of facilities and the related world‐ ****************  wide  distribution,  but  also  because  of  the  number  of different users (Columbus and ATV flight control,    payload  facilities,  engineering  support,  PR)  with  their specific operational needs and constraints.    Security  Security is no longer only seen as IT‐Security but as  18
  19. 19. projects  a  target  mission  already  has  been  identified with challenging need dates.   TECHNOLOGIES  Traditionally  "database"  typically  means  Relational  Database  Management  Systems  (RDBMS)  for  the  back‐ end  part.  For  the  front‐end  over  the  years  Java‐based  solutions  can  be  considered  as  de‐facto  standard.  In  ****************  particular  in  the  last  decade  the  Java  –based  Eclipse  development  provides  many  free  resources  for  the  Next Generation of Spacecraft Reference Database at  development of such elements.   Astrium   Eisenmann, H.1; Cazenave, C.2  More  and  more  the  Eclipse  developments  also  cover  1 Astrium Satellites, GERMANY; 2Astrium Satellites,  elements  which  can  be  considered  as  a  fully  fledged  FRANCE  data  management  kernel.  Validation  activities  performed  show  very  promising  results.  Those BACKGROUND  validation  activities  comprise  Astrium  internal The application of databases for engineering data has a  developments  but  in  particular  also  activities  jointly long lasting record at Astrium. One of the traditional use  performed with ESA e.g. Space System Reference Model cases for databases is to support the processes for the  (SSRM) or Virtual Spacecraft Design (VSD).  definition,  verification  and  exchange  of  telecommand and  telemetry  data.  Beyond  the  classic  use  case  for  Furthermore along the definition of the ECSS E‐T‐10‐23 TM/TC  in  the  frame  of  model‐based  systems  model based development for database engineering has engineering,  the  need  for  a  increased  coverage  of  been  identified  as  a  very  beneficial  technology  for system engineering data became obvious.   database  development.  The  TM  also  contains  a  draft  conceptual  data  model,  which  has  been  used  for  the Since the current systems in use have been in operation  validation.  Along  the  validation  and  application  of for  more  than  a  decade,  the  technologies  in  use  are  model‐based development for database engineering the outdated.  As  result  of  that,  the  maintenance  and  role  of  the  (conceptual)  data  model  evolved.  This  also evolution  became  more  tedious  and  thus  labour  and  put a focus on how actually the model is defined. There cost  intensive.  Therefore  it  is  planned  to  replace  the  are  several  technologies  available,  more  or  less current  Astrium  products  for  system  database  with  a  technology  independent,  more  or  less  expressive  with new  product,  developed  by  state  of  the  art  respect to the semantics.  technologies.   STATUS CONTEXT  In  2010  the  developments  have  been  prepared  with  a The  development  started  mustnt  be  considered  as  an  definition  of  user  requirements  documents,  involving isolated  tool  development.  Rather  for  a  successful  the different user domains at Astrium. In parallel to that development  the  different  activities  concurrently  technology  prototyping  have  been  performed  i.e.  to performed  have  to  be  carefully  analysed  and  assess  the  performance  of  the  envisaged  technologies considered.  The  most  important  activities  which  are  for  TM/TC  databases.  With  beginning  of  2011  the  user dependent on the database development vice versa are  requirements  are  currently  consolidated.  The namely:   development has been started.   ECSS: There are various standards to be considered  STATUS  for  the  development  of  a  new  system  database,  The paper will elaborate on the following:   those  comprise  E‐70‐41,  E‐70‐31,  ...Parts  of  it  are  stable,  but  for  some  of  them  quite  recently  an   use  cases  and  key  user  requirements  for  the  update  is  in  progress,  like  e.g.  E‐70‐41.  Although  upcoming system database   not ECSS, but the MIB model can be considered as a   Selected technologies with trades performed   de‐fact standard. It seems that also for the MIB and   Envisaged overall architecture   update is planned.    Model‐based development approach   EGS‐CC: Under the lead of ESA an activity has been   Data model considerations   started to develop core parts of a future CCS.   Internal EADS standardization on PLM systems.   ****************  Astrium  Projects:  It  is  planned  to  develop  a  common  infrastructure  which  supports  all  projects    covering  all  different  S/C  types  –  for  Agencies  but  also commercial customers. For telecommunication  19
  20. 20. BASyS: Neo Satellite Database Management System   reporting,  database  configuration  control,  import,  Garzón, H.  export and user management.  GMV, SPAIN  The  project  has  faced  several  challenges  during  the BASyS is the new multi platform and multi site database  deployment phases but the difficulty of defining a set of management system, developed by GMV for Eutelsat, in  definitive requirements can be remarked. The migration charge of managing the whole Eutelsat satellites fleet.  of  a  previous  tool  and the  adaption  of  another  system  introduced a high level of complexity. The main objective of the project is the replacement of the  current  Eutelsat  database  management  tool  based  **************** on  a  Microsoft  Access  by  a  more  robust,  reliable  and maintainable  system  based  on  open  source  Mission Automation System for the International components.  Space Innovation Centre at Harwell   Roveda, F.1; Kay, R.1; Raper, I.2  1BASyS  is  based  on  DABYS  Framework  and  Generic  and  Logica Deutschland GmbH & Co.KG, GERMANY;  2S2K  Data  Manager  developed  by  ESA.  The  principal  Astrium Ltd., UNITED KINGDOM activity  of  the  deployment  is  the  adaptation  and customization  of  the  DABYS  Framework  and  the  S2K  When  used  within  the  space  sector  the  term Data  Manager  to  the  Eutelsat  specific  requirements  in  "Automation"  almost  always  refers  to  a  spacecraft the frame of Neo SCS.  automation  system  that  automates  the  execution  of  flight operations procedures. However, the spacecraft is BASyS is a 3‐tier application composed mainly of:  only  one  element  of  the  entire  space  system  and  that  space  element  must  be  complemented  with  complex  MySQL  as  the  database  management  system  ground equipment and software systems that allow the  providing the data backend.  overall  space  mission  to  be  successfully  executed.  An  A  Java  server  providing  the  data  management  effective  mission  automation  system  should  therefore  services.  support  the  simplification  and/or  automation  of  the  And  an  Eclipse  RCP  client  providing  the  user  operations of both ground and space system elements.  interface.  FoxE  is  a  Mission  Automation  System  specifically BASyS  introduces  a  huge  range  of  new  elements  with  designed  to  support  any  element  of  the  entire  space respect  to  DABYS.  The  following  aspects  are  the  most  system  using  a  domain  specific  language  supporting remarkable ones:  monitoring and controlling statements applicable to any  system element.   BASyS  incorporates  the  multi  mission  concept  within  the  system  in  order  to  provide  a  Simplicity  was  the  primary  goal  of  this  project.  Every  homogeneous  management  of  different  satellite  feature,  from  the  language  specification  to  the  platforms.  It  makes  transparent  those  features  of  friendliness  of  the  GUI,  has  been  designed  and  specific satellite families.  implemented  with  the  primary  goal  of  simplifying  the  It  has  been  customized  for  accepting  the  Neo  SCS  use of the system and the procedures that it executes.   data  model  and  any  other  database  feature  required by Neo SCS.  FoxE  was  designed  and  implemented  by  Logica  BASYS integrates the on line database distribution  Deutschland GmbH to achieve the following objectives:   system  in  charge  of  updating  the  operational  satellite  databases  in  Neo  without  any  loss  of   Minimise  the  complexity  of  the  automation  telemetry.  language   BASyS  is  a  high  availability  system  with  the   One language for both manual and automated  introduction  of  the  MySQL  replication  and  Linux  procedures   High Availability technologies.   Direct  support  for  monitoring  and  controlling  BASyS  extends  the  DABYS  database  consistency  language constructs   checking  for  including  new  items  required  by  the   360 degree mission automation system   Neo SCS model.   Simple  extendibility  to  support  any  type  of  The BASyS software development environment has  system elements   been adapted to the Eutelsat development system   Top‐level  procedures  defining  abstracted  and software life cycle.  mission automation tasks   A  significant  number  of  improvements  have  been   System elements class and/or instance specific  also  included  with  respect  to  the  typical  database  procedures to map top‐level procedures steps  management  functions  like  data  editing  and  into  specific  system  element  monitoring  and  controlling tasks   20
  21. 21.  Web based MMI to allow zero deployment and  robotic  missions  implementing  telepresence  like  DEOS  zero configuration of clients   or METERON.  FoxE  has  been  selected  by  Astrium  Ltd.  as  prime  For  telepresence  we  highlight  possible  ways  to  use contractor  for  the  establishment  of  the  Earth  ground  based physics  simulations  to  support  operators Observation  Hub  at  the  International  Space  Innovation  and set up early‐warning systems.  Centre  at  Harwell  to  support  the  low  cost  operations concept  through  high‐degree  of  automation  of  both  **************** ground and space segments.  Inmarsat: Automation of Satellite and Ground This  paper  presents  in  detail  the  objectives,  the  Operations  approach,  the  challenges  and  the  solutions  that  Logica  Rossetti, A; Dickinson, M; Sansone, C has  adopted  to  implement  this  system  within  a  very  Inmarsat, UNITED KINGDOM tight project schedule and budget. The resulting system is  now  deployed  at  ISIC  and  currently  undergoing  the  Over the past 15 years, Inmarsats operational concept end‐to‐end system tests.   has changed significantly to make effective and efficient  use  of  automation.  Inmarsat  has  been  at  the  forefront  of this area of operations. Using the I4S, the monitoring  and  control  system  developed  jointly  between  L‐3  Storm and Inmarsat, it has been possible to implement  a  highly  flexible  ground  architecture  which  provides  a  high  level  of  operational  automation.  The  I4S  control  system  is  currently  used  to  autonomously  perform  all  planned celestial operations across the whole Inmarsat  fleet  (  12  satellites  from  4  different  platforms  and  ground  equipment  for  7  ground  stations)  as  well  as  monitor  satellite  subsystem  health  conditions  ,  performing  the  detection  and  in  some  cases  the  rapid  recovery from well characterised anomalies.   Automated  monitoring  and  control  is  achieved  in  a    single manning environment with the satellite controller  in  a  supervisory  role  to  provide  full  oversight  of  the  ****************  scheduled  activities,  with  the  ability  to  take  manual  control if required, responding to anomalous behaviour  Ground Segment Autonomy: A Revised Approach   as  well  as  executing  manual  activities.  Automation  has Mueller, H.; Stoetzel, H.; Plura, M.; Lampka, R.; Foutou,  been  deployed  in  several  stages  and  the  development  F.; Henke, M.  of the I4S has allowed Inmarsat to initially start with the  VCS AG, GERMANY  automation  of  eclipses,  blindings,  ranging  and  station  keeping  operations.  This  has  been  extended  to  include The  discussion  of  possibilities  and  drawbacks  for  the  scheduling  and  execution  of  almost  all  routine autonomous  systems  in  space  is  ongoing.  Early  operations  (e.g.  batteries  charge  control,  heaters breakthroughs have been made in the area of GNC and  switching,  testing  of  redundant  units,  TT&C  antenna intelligent  sensors,  advanced  FDIR  and  smart  data  control ).  handling as implemented in THEMIS. Traditionally much effort  has  always  been  spent  on  planning  and  Operations  are  automatically  scheduled  using  request scheduling,  both,  on‐board  (e.g.  DS1  (RAX),  EO1  (ASE))  files submitted to the control system with all mandatory and  ground  supported  (e.g.  MEXAR),  whereas  in  this  details,  like  start  time  of  activities,  unit  to  be  used  . area  mainly  the  capability  of  self‐initiated  re‐planning  These  request  files  are  automatically  detected  and and schedule repair contributes to autonomous systems  acted  upon  by  specific  system  tasks,  which  start  the as such.  automated procedure for the required operation.  In  this  presentation  we  identify  schedule/procedure  In  this  workshop  we  will  to  present  our  experience, execution  engines  as  a  core  asset  for  ground  segment  lesson  learnt  and  describe  the  tools  available  to  our autonomy  provided  that  adequate  models  like  the  Satellite  Control  Centre  to  support  this  approach  and Space System Model (SSM) are available to support the  mitigate possible risks  process  of  auto‐triggered  re‐planning  using  e.g. predefined  alternatives.  A  relatively  new  application  **************** potentially benefiting from ground based autonomy are  21
  22. 22. European Technology Harmonisation on Ground  immediately  after  ESAW.  The  presentation  will  give  an  Software Systems: Update of Reference Architecture   overview  of  the  project  and  the  main  topics  to  be  Reid, S.1; Pearson, S.1; Davies, K.2; Carvalho, B.3  covered at the workshop.   1 Rhea System S.A., BELGIUM; 2TERMA, GERMANY;  3 Critical Software, PORTUGAL  **************** RHEA leads a consortium of companies that undertaking  CNES Control Centre mock‐up : an evaluation of a the  latest  project  for  European  Technology  standard SOA architecture  Harmonisation  on  Ground  Software  Systems.  The  Bornuat, P.1;Cros, P‐A.1;Pipo, C.1;Anadon, M‐L.2;Gelie, P.2  1project represents the culmination of a series of earlier  CS Systèmes d’Information, FRANCE; 2CNES, FRANCE activities:   CNES  experience  in  developing  and  operating  Definition  of  a  Reference  Architecture  (RA)  (led  by  spacecrafts  control  centres  has  shown  that  costs  and  Critical Software)   risks may be significantly reduced by setting up product  Establishing an initial set of standard interfaces (led  lines.  Accordingly,  CNES  has  decided  to  develop  a  new  by Critical Software)   control  centre,  with  an  operation  deadline  in  2016,  Validation of the initial set of standard interfaces by  which should satisfy several main objectives: conform to  prototyping (led by Terma)   international  space  standards  (among  which  CCSDS  Harmonisation  of  Simulation  ‐  EGSE  Interfaces  Mission  Operations  –  MO  –  standard,  and  ECSS  Packet  (Rovsing, Dutch Space)   Utilisation Standard – PUS), reduce possession costs and  Control Procedure Execution (CPE) (led by RHEA).   enhance  development  process  reliability,  and  aim  at  some evolutive and re‐usable product line.  The  most  recent  projects  produced  a  detailed  set  of recommendations,  further  augmented  by  decisions  The  implementation  of  a  control  centre  mock‐up,  has made by the Technology Harmonisation Steering Board  been delegated by CNES to CS as a preparation to future (THSB).  The  purpose  of  this  project  is  to  consolidate  developments  in  order  to  evaluate  Service‐Oriented those  recommendations  and  update  the  Reference  Architecture (SOA) together with available technologies Architecture (RA) accordingly.   and check their suitability to critical subsystems, owing  to  better  agility  and  interoperability  than  monolithic A  key  element  of  the  work  concerns  alignment  of  the  systems.  Reference  Architecture  with  relevant  and  emerging standards from ECSS and CCSDS.   The  control  centre  mock‐up  consists  of  4  subsystems,  composing the Control Centre kernel: Reference  architectures  for  the  Operational  Control System (OCS) and Electrical Ground Segment Equipment   the Command and Control subsystem, in charge of (EGSE)  were  established  and  evolved  independently,  on‐ground/on‐board  exchanges  i.e.  telemetry even  though  a  commonality  in  functionality  is  reception and telecommands uplink;  universally  recognised.  A  key  task  of  this  project  is  to   the DataStore subsystem which offers data storage establish a reference architecture which converges on a  and retrieval services, and thus plays a central role core of common functions used in both environments.  in data distribution between components;  The  design  work  will  therefore  establish  the  core   the  Visualisation  component  giving  final  users  the building blocks and their associated interfaces.   capability  to  display,  either  in  real  time  or  offline,  any information archived in the DataStore;  The  project  will  also  introduce  a  "Service  Oriented   the  Flight  Dynamics  component,  providing  few View"  for  the  Reference  Architecture,  not  currently  services,  developed  to  test  that  MO  standard  may implemented.  A  Service  view  has  been  considered  in  correspond  to  Flight  Dynamics  specific earlier phases, but is now seen as an essential product.  requirements in terms of processing modularity.  It  will  be  especially  relevant  for  establishing  service interfaces  offered  by  the  Common  Core  of  OCS  and  Those  4  subsystems  compose  the  heart  of  a  Control EGSE functions and will also play a key role in identifying  Centre,  offering  solutions  to  most  of  major  related the  relationships  between  the  RA  and  the  ECSS  and  requirements  such  as  communication  with  the CCSDS standards.   spacecraft,  data  archiving  and  retrieval  services  together with distribution and visualisation means. Yet, The project started in March 2011 features a workshop,  their functionalities have been limited for the mock‐up open  to  all  stakeholders  and  interested  parties.  The  (reduced  PUS  services  and  types  of  archived  data  for workshop  will  present  the  key  challenges  for  the  example).  project,  invites  debate  and  aims  to  achieve  consensus on  key  design  decisions  that  need  to  be  made.  The  The  control  centre  mock‐up  is  entirely  based  on  a workshop  is  due  to  take  place  in  ESOC  on  12  May,  service‐oriented  architecture  in  strict  accordance  with  22
  23. 23. CCSDS  MO  standard.  Fully  standardised,  adaptable,   Geographic  Information  System  (GIS)  in  order  to agile  and  reusable,  it  stands  as  an  evaluation  platform  prepare  the  campaign  maps  and  layers  of  the for new ground segments architecture, and for Control  various operational sites.  Centres  harmonisation  question.  At  last  it  also  enables to validate the interface between ECSS PUS standard for  Since the balloons embed heavy scientific payloads (up on‐ground/on‐board  exchanges  and  CCSDS  MO  for  to  several  tons),  and  since  the  missions  may  be ground exchanges.   performed  over  habited  areas,  the  NOSYCA  Ground  Segment  shall  meet  strong  safety  requirements.  Although  the  control  centre  mock‐up  architecture  is  The  ground  segment  therefore  includes  critical service‐oriented, it is also module‐oriented; as a matter  software,  among  with:  additional  software  performing of  fact,  all  its  applications  are  based  on  the  Equinox  double‐checks  on  the  decoded  critical  Telemetry OSGi  Java‐based  framework;  moreover,  its  lifecycle  is  parameters  and  double‐checks  on  the  radiation  of ruled lying on Eclipse P2 provisioning infrastructure (an  critical  Telecommands.  The  ground  segment  also OSGi  Life‐cycle  layer),  giving  the  capability  to  have  provides a redundant Control Centre, used in case of a bundles  installed,  started,  stopped,  updated  and  general failure of the nominal Control Centre.  uninstalled in this framework.   The  solution  provided  by  Capgemini  is  based  on  the Both  service  and  module  orientations  contribute  to  following components and COTS:  offering  a  very  agile,  scalable  and  modular  resulting system  for  services  providers  as  well  as  for  client   Octave  software  components  (provided  by  CNES), applications.   which  provides  the  raw  Telemetry  decommutation  software,  and  MMIs  allowing  the  Monitoring  of  ****************  Telemetry and the radiation of Telecommands.    MDF,  which  is  an  Eclipse  RCP‐based  technology  NOSYCA: the New Operational System for the control  used to develop all Control Centre MMIs   of Aerostats    World  Wind  Java,  a  Google  Earth‐like  component,  Nouvellon, S.  used  to  display  the  real‐time  trajectories  of  the  Capgemini, FRANCE  monitored balloons.    Cocpit  Software  (provided  by  CNES),  used  to NOSYCA  is  a  fail‐safe  ground  segment  designed  to  manage the configuration of missions, balloons and command and control a fleet of stratospheric balloons,  Control Centres.  operated  by  CNES.  It  will  allow  performing  scientific missions,  such  as  atmosphere  or  astronomical  The architecture of NOSYCA is very much based on the observations.  The  ground  segment  includes  a  Nominal  reuse  of  existing  software  components  (traditionally and  a  Redundant  Control  Centre  (developed  by  used  in  the  satellite  ground  segments).  Capgemini),  and  S  band  ground  stations.  A  Control  This  allows  providing  to  the  scientific  community  a Centre  allows  managing  several  missions  (up  to  20  reliable,  scalable  and  high‐performance  Ground balloons).  Two  balloons  may  be  monitored  and  Segment  to  manage  balloon  missions,  on  various controlled  in  the  meantime.  Control  Centres  may  be  operational sites all around the world.  deployed  in  mobile  units  and  can  withstand  frequent installations and de‐installations.   **************** The  NOSYCA  Control  Centres  offer  the  following  Ten Galileo FOC Payload EGSE Systems – Challenges in features:   Design, MAIT and Schedule   Kubr, H.; Mader, W.; Unfried, C.  Remote  monitoring  and  control  of  balloon  Siemens AG Österreich, AUSTRIA  equipments,  through  the  high  bit  rate,  S  band  connection  (in  nominal  mode),  and  through  Siemens  Austria  has  a  long  track  record  in  providing  redundant iridium and inmarstat spacecrafts links;   EGSE  components  and  subsystems.  For  Galileo*  IOV,  Complete flight management, including the launch,  apart  from  Power  SCOE  and  TT&C  SCOE,  Siemens  has  flight, drift descent of the balloons   been responsible for the Payload Test System (customer  Forecast of balloons flight paths, based on aerostat  Astrium Ltd).   flight dynamics algorithms;   Enhanced  MMIs  for  pilots,  operations  managers  For the FOC phase, Siemens has been selected by Surrey  and weather analysts ;   Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL, UK) for the supply of  Supply  of  flight  data  to  scientists  and  external  the  whole  Payload  EGSE,  which  consists  of  a  Service  systems ;   Module  Simulator  (SMS)  covering  all  the  Power‐,  Mil‐ Bus  and  Discrete  Front‐Ends  to  the  Galileo  Payload,  as  well  as  the  Payload  Test  System  (PTS)  covering  the  RF  23
  24. 24. interfaces to the Payload and providing automated Test  station  engineers.  The  driving  factor  behind  the sequences  to  measure  critical  payload  parameters.  development  of  the  new  GSMC  is  to  provide  much The PTS Master Test Controller is based on SCOS‐2000,  needed new functionality to allow much more flexibility thereby  fully  exploiting  the  heritage  from  the  SCOS‐ and provide improved capabilities.  2000  EGSE  Reference  platform  and  fully  compatible  to the  SCOS‐2000  based  Galileo  FOC  Core  EGSE  (provided  The  baseline  for  development  of  the  Common by Terma to OHB).  Monitoring  and  Control  platform  is  the  generic  MCS  control  system  SCOS‐2000.  While  this  system  has The  P/L  EGSE  also  provides  a  high  performance  Time  continuously been improved over the years, it has been Reference  including  Ultra  Stable  Oscillator  with  designed  to  be  used  on  a  Local  Area  Network. Redundant  Active  Hydrogen  Masers  for  providing  the  One of the major changes for the GSMC development is time  reference  of  the  EGSE  and  measuring  the  that  the  new  system  will  be  distributed  over  a  Wide performance  of  the  Payload  Clocks  (passive  Masers).  Area Network with limited bandwidth and high latency. The  Thermal  SCOE  provides  heaters/cooling  interfaces  Server  components  will  be  located  at  the  ground to the Payload.   stations,  however  the  operator  workstation  may  be  located  at  a  remote  location,  typically  at  the  ESTRACK Siemens  provides  the  work  together  with  Control Centre at ESOC.  subcontractors,  which  have  as  well  long  experience  in EGSE  applications:  SSBV  for  the  SMS  hardware  and  The  existing  Ground  Station  Tailoring  System  (GSTS)  is Terma  for  the  SMS  software  and  Thermal  SCOE.  another  important  aspect  considered  critical  for  this The  technical  challenges  are  not  only  to  integrate  project. The GSTS has been in use for a number of years, complex  subsystems,  but  also  to  manage  a  highly  significant  usability  improvements  can  be  made  when demanding  delivery  schedule  to  provide  10  P/L  EGSE  providing its replacement. The main goal is to produce a systems  in  the  course  of  2011.  5  Systems  will  be  system  that  will  be  a  welcome  improvement  over  the installed at the P/L integration site in Guildford and 5 at  current  systems  in  place  and  with  allow  engineers  to the  S/C  integration  at  OHB  Systems  in  Bremen.  undertake day to day activities in a much more efficient The  P/L  EGSE  project  has  been  started  in  March  2010  manner.  and has reached CDR in September. The first delivery to SSTL took place in February, 2011 and the shipment of  The  EGOS  User  Desktop  as  well  will  be  supplying  the the first system to OHB is scheduled for April 2011.   majority  of  graphical  user  interfaces  for  the  GSMC  by  also  including  substantial  new  implementations  like ‐‐‐  MIMICs and Matrix displays.  *  Please  note  that  the  term  "Galileo"  refers  to  the "satellite‐supported European Navigation System".   ****************  ****************  Evolution of FEC architecture   Fernandez‐Ranada, I1; Fuentes, A1; Perez, R1; Droll, P2  1 GSMC ‐ Ground Station Monitoring & Control   TCP Sistemas e Ingeniería, SPAIN; 2European Space  Riccio, F.1; Lannes, C.2  Agency, ESA/ESOC, GERMANY  1 Logica Deutschland GmbH & Co. KG, GERMANY;  2 European Space Agency ESA/ESOC, GERMANY  The  FEC,  the  Front‐End  Controller  system,  is  a  key  element  of  ESAs  Ground  Segment  infrastructure.  It The  GSMC  Implementation  is  the  implementation  and  provides critical functions required for establishing and detailed design phase of the Ground Station Monitoring  maintaining  the  communication  with  the  spacecraft.  It and  Control  system.  As  part  of  the  project  is  also  is  furthermore  an  intelligent  subsystem  used  for  the included the Common Monitoring and Control Platform.  monitoring  and  control  of  the  equipment  installed  in  a The  project  is  representing  the  next  generation  of  the  ground  station  antenna.  The  FEC  evaluates  and Station Computer2 and Monitoring and Control Station  combines  monitoring  information  in  order  to  control which represent the current system used for monitoring  the  equipment  according  to  predefined  algorithms. & control Ground Stations. Integration, reuse of existing  These  algorithms  have  been  verified  and  improved code,  new  challenging  implementations  in  new  area  during  years  of  routine  operations,  LEOPs  and never explored before (i.e. WAN problems including low  spacecraft emergency cases.  bandwidth  and  delayed  communications  links)  are  the key  issues  of  this  project.   The  current  Front‐End  Controller  installed  in  all The GSMC will replace systems that have been in use for  ESTRACK  antennas,  is  the  result  of  the  porting  of  the many  years.  These  existing  systems  have  been  FEC  MkIII  on  a  Motorola‐VersaDOS  platform  to  a  MS‐continuously  maintained  and  any  problems  with  Windows  platform.  During  the  last  ten  years  several reliability  have  long  since  been  ironed  out.  As  such  new  functions  have  been  implemented,  which  implied these  systems  have  gained  the  trust  of  the  ground  the  development  of  many  enhancements  and  24
  25. 25. improvements  in  the  functionality  of  the  system,  but  remaining  aligned  to  the  "core"  product  development not in its architecture.   within ESOC. We also identify some lessons learned that  should  be  fed  into  current  initiatives  for  developing One  of  the  major  drawbacks  of  the  current  system  such infrastructure products.  architecture  was  the  insufficient  separation  of  the ground  station  dependent  and  ground  station  **************** independent software modules. Already minor changes related  to  the  monitored  devices  affected  immediately  Satellite Control Systems Provision and Maintenance the  system  code,  resulting  in  undesired  side‐effects/  Choices  misbehaviour  and  unnecessary  effort  for  the  software  Tortosa, M. maintenance.  In  order  to  make  the  FEC  independent  Eutelsat, FRANCE from  the  logical  distribution  of  the  devices,  the architecture  of  the  system  has  been  modified.  E.g.  Eutelsat  satellite  control  facilities  operate  23  satellites device drivers can now be added, removed or updated  on‐station  and  permits  to  supports  LEOP  operation  for from the FEC purely by tailoring the FEC software.   new launches. The initial satellite control software was  based  on  European  Space  Agency  technology.  New The  so  called  FEC  World  is  the  heart  of  the  data  systems  and  facilities  have  been  implementing  taking representation  of  the  FEC.  Previously,  the  definition  of  advantage  of  the  open  nature  of  the  the  initial the  FEC  World  tree  defining  the  parameter  ID,  type,  deployment.  This  has  permitted  to  cope  with  new initialisation  of  values,  etc.  was  hardcoded.  Now  all  requirements  for  the  control  of  more  complex  and these  information  is  read  directly  from  the  FEC  World  powerful satellite platforms and to enhance operability. database and the FECW tree is automatically initialized.   In  the  implementation  of  these  enhancements  preference is given to develop on open software rather An  important  step  to  make  the  FEC  software  than  on  proprietary  products  that  are  expensive  to independent  from  the  ground  station  was  the  procure  and  even  more  expensive  and  difficult  to introduction  of  truth  tables  for  the  derivation  of  maintain  over  the  long  term.  This  permits  to  build  up monitoring  parameters.  The  (logical)  relationship  infrastructure  that  can  be  reused  in  future between  parameters  is  defined  in  matrixes,  which  can  implementations.  Such  an  option  has  the  ability  to be modified without affecting the code.   adapt  progressively  to  changes  in  the  operation  or  the  maintenance  process.  It  permits  the  introduction  of Another aim in the frame of the FEC enhancement is the  new  technology  or  of  capabilities  than  in  other harmonisation  of  the  FEC  system  with  the  other  ESA  circumstances  result  in  adding  stress  to  the  operation ground  segment  software  systems,  within  the  EGOS  and  to  the  organisation  of  the  work. initiative. The future FEC will run on the recommended  Presentation topics will include: baseline OS, which is currently Linux SLES 11, 64 bit. In  ‐ Evolution of the systems used by Eutelsat for satellite order  to  ease  future  porting,  it  was  decided  to  control. implement it as a multi‐platform system. All system calls  ‐ Multi‐mission environment: the challenge of reducing were  moved  to  common  libraries,  and  these  were  complexity and operational costs; developed  to  work  for  Linux  and  Windows  OS.  The  ‐ Key topics in the provision and maintenance of ground result is a code capable of working in both platforms.   control systems.  ‐ Multi‐purpose design: develop once and use in many This paper is aimed at describing the strategy followed  ways. for  the  design  and  implementation  of  these  ‐ Building up on Web technology. architectural  enhancements  within  the  FEC.  It  will  ‐ Lessons learnt: strengths and issues. discuss the results obtained and the experience gained  The presentation will try to encourage the exchange on during this period.   the above areas to come up with the grounds for  successful outcome and with problematical issues.   ****************  ****************  Exploiting ESOC infrastructure over the long term   Patrick, R  Ground Station Network for Micro/Nanosatellite  Terma A/S, DENMARK  Operation   Kurahara, N.1; Shirasaka, S.2; Nakasuka, S.1  1 University of Tokyo, JAPAN; 2Keio University, JAPAN It  is  nearly  10  years  now  that  a  wide  range  companies and organisations have been exploiting ESOC ‐ software ‐  infrastructure  products  for  their  own  purposes.  The  For  last  decade,  satellite  research  and  development  in most  widely  used  of  these  is  SCOS‐2000.  This  paper  the  Universities  or  small  businesses  have  been  getting looks at how we at Terma have managed to exploit the  popular.  Dozens  of  micro/nano‐satellite,  which  weighs opportunities and our experience over the long term of  only  tens  kg,  development  projects  are  ongoing  in  all  25

×