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Types of Irony
Types of Irony
Types of Irony
Types of Irony
Types of Irony
Types of Irony
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Types of Irony

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  • Washing your car then having it rain is not ironic - nothing has led you to believe it would not rain. That is simply an unfortunate coincidence. Irony comes from the implications that a particular thing will happen, then that does not occur. For example, if the weather forecast were to predict 0% chance of rain, and the skies were clear and sunny, so you decided to take a picnic, then got caught in the rain, that would be ironic because something has led you to believe there would be no rain. Simply washing your car and having it rain sucks, but it doesn't constitute irony.
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  • 1. TYPES OF IRONY
  • 2. Situational Irony:
    • When the opposite of what is expected to happen, happens.
    • ie. You wash your car and then it rains.
  • 3. Verbal Irony:
    • In conversation, the speaker intends to be understood as meaning something that contrasts with the literal or usual meaning of what he says.
    • ie. "My, you've certainly made a mess of things!" could be said to a hostess who presents a spectacular dish prepared with obvious care and skill.
  • 4. Dramatic Irony:
    • When the reader or audience are aware of something that the characters in the story are not.
    • The reader/audience waits anxiously to find out what will happen when the characters discover what we already know.
    • ie. In Act II while Romeo & Juliet make plans for a happy future the audience already knows of their fate since they’ve been told by the chorus in the Prologue.
  • 5. Dramatic Irony con’t:
    • Dramatic Irony makes the reader/audience feel suspense.
  • 6. THE END

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