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Project Proposal Guidelines
 

Project Proposal Guidelines

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    Project Proposal Guidelines Project Proposal Guidelines Document Transcript

    • APPLIED MATHEMATICS WITH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES FAR EASTERN UNIVERSITYSOFTDEV Project Paper Guidelines and PoliciesThese policies and guidelines were formulated with the objective of helping the BSAMITstudents of the Institute of Arts and Sciences to deliver useful projects on time.Comments and suggestions are continually welcome for the betterment of theundergraduate program. Prepared by Prof. Erwin M. Globio, MSIT Thesis Coordinator December 2011
    • Project Paper Guidelines Table of Contents 1. Objectives ......................................................................................................................... 3 2. Scope of the Project Paper.............................................................................................. 3 3. Project Paper Stages ....................................................................................................... 3 3.1 Preliminary Project Paper Proposal Writing (after completing 15 units) .......... 3 3.2 Project Paper Proposal Writing (after completing 27 units) ................................ 4 3.3 Project Paper Proposal Submission (after completing 30 units) .......................... 4 3.4 Final Project Paper Defense (after submitting the project paper proposal) ....... 4 4. Duties And Responsibilities ............................................................................................ 5 4.1 The Project Proponent ............................................................................................... 5 4.2 The Project Paper Adviser ........................................................................................ 6 4.2.1 Selection.............................................................................................................. 6 4.2.2 Responsibilities .................................................................................................. 6 4.3 The Project Paper Defense Panel .............................................................................. 6 4.3.1 Selection.............................................................................................................. 6 4.3.2 Responsibilities .................................................................................................. 7 4.4 The Graduate Studies Coordinator .......................................................................... 7 5. Document Format ........................................................................................................... 8 5.1 Project Paper Proposal Outline and Contents ......................................................... 8 5.2 Project Paper Document Outline and Contents .................................................... 10 5.3 Format For References, Citations, and Quotations............................................... 13 5.4 Technical Manual ..................................................................................................... 18 5.5 User’s Manual ........................................................................................................... 18 5.6 Conference Paper ..................................................................................................... 19 6. Forms.............................................................................................................................. 20 6.1 Title Page.................................................................................................................. 20 6.2 Project Paper Proposal Approval Sheet ................................................................ 21 6.3 Final Project Paper Approval Sheet ...................................................................... 22 6.4 Final Project Paper Defense Evaluation Sheet ..................................................... 23 6.5 Final Project Paper Defense Approval Form ....................................................... 24 6.6 Final Project Paper Defense Proponent Guidelines ............................................. 25Page 2
    • BSAMIT Program1. ObjectivesThe project paper is a non-classroom learning environment in which students apply the skills, methods,and theories learned throughout their stay in the BSAMIT program. The main question that the projectdocument must answer is “What is the application of specific fields of computer Science/InformationTechnology?”With the goal of adequately preparing students for their respective careers by involving them in a projectthat extends one semester, the project paper is put in place to demonstrate application of concepts andexhaustive and convincing related literature.2. Scope of the Project PaperThe project paper adviser must ensure that the project is feasible/attainable within one semester. If astudent wants to complete the program on the term Final Project Paper Writing is enrolled, the majoractivities must be done accordingly: Preliminary Project Paper Proposal Writing - starts after completing CSSYSAND Project Paper Proposal Writing - starts upon enrolment of SOFTDEV Project Paper Proposal Submission - starts after the approved proposal by the Thesis Coordinator Final Project Paper Defense - starts after submitting the project paper proposal approved by the Thesis Coordinator3. Project Paper StagesThe entire project paper program officially starts upon successful submission of the project proposal andends with the submission of an approved project paper document and other deliverables. The projectpaper has four stages. At the end of every stage, each project paper proponent submits specificdeliverables for evaluation and acceptance by an adviser, and in the end by a project paper defense panel.For all the stages of the project paper project, the criteria used when deliberating the defense verdictinclude:a. complete and acceptable deliverables;b. a well-prepared and delivered presentation; andc. a productive Question and Answer session.d. Working Program/System including the necessary documentation3.1 Preliminary Project Proposal WritingPreliminary project paper proposal writing results in the identification of a project paper project. Thisstage involves the following activities:a. identification of the problem;b. specification of the objectives of the project; andc. search of related literature.The only deliverable at the end of this stage is a concept paper. There is no defense at this stage. Thestudents are encouraged to consult with Prof. Erwin M. Globio, the Thesis Coordinator and any other ITFaculty Member of the IAS. Page 3
    • Project Paper Guidelines3.2 Project Proposal WritingThe deliverable at the end of this stage is an approved proposal that includes a partial project paperdocument covering Chapters 1 to 3, as well as appendices to include proposed architectural design and/ortheoretical/conceptual framework. These chapters include the Introduction (background, objectives, scopeand limitations), Review of Literature and Studies, Technical Background, and the description and initialdesign of the system to be developed. Description and the Initial Design must be 50% of the developedSystem or Software.3.3 Project Paper Proposal SubmissionThe proponents are required to submit the 80% of the Software Developed and the CompleteDocumentation. There is no defense for the project paper proposal. The final project paper proposal(approved and signed by the project paper adviser) must be submitted to Prof. Erwin M. Globio on/orbefore the first week of February 2012.3.4 Final Project Paper Defense (after submitting the project paper proposal)The student enroll in project paper writing course as well as application for final project paper defenseafter having gone through the following:a. implementation/development of the solution identified in Systems Analysis and Designb. analysis of the solutionc. testing and gathering of resultsd. documentation of the resultse. finalization of the project paper documentf. preparation for the project paper presentation and defenseThe following are the deliverables required at the end of this stage:a. the complete/revised project paper documentb. for project paper involving software support systems or applications:  the Technical Manual;  the User‟s Manual (If the system is immediately deployable); and  the running software.c. the final project paper and the developed software must have an approval coming from the ThesisCoordinator.A project paper proponent is eligible for defense only if:a. students secure an approval coming from the Thesis Coordinator two weeks before the Defense date.b. project paper adviser recommends the project paper by signing the Application for Final Project Paper Writing Defense Form;c. three copies of the project paper are submitted to Prof. Erwin Globio, Thesis Coordinator at least two (2) weeks before the actual defense date. Defense normally starts on the second week of February.The three possible verdicts after the defense are:a. ACCEPT WITH REVISIONS. Minor/Major revisions are necessary to enhance the document and/or software, but they do not have to be presented in front of the panelists. The panelists are tasked to make sure that all the revisions are made.b. NOT ACCEPTED. Either the objectives of the study have not been met or the proponent cheated.Page 4
    • BSAMIT ProgramThe verdict is a unanimous decision among the three members of the project paper defense panel. Onceissued, it is final and irrevocable.It is encouraged that the students schedule their defenses two weeks before the defense date, this is to givethe students more time to revise the final project paper for verdicts of „ACCEPT WITH REVISIONS‟either Major or Minor revisions. It also allows the student to improve or redo their final project paper incases of „NOT ACCEPTED‟. The student can only graduate within the semester if the final approvedproject paper is submitted to the Office of the University Registrar before the first week of March.The following table summarizes the guidelines discussed in this section: STAGE PREREQUISITES DELIVERABLES POSSIBLE VERDICTS Preliminary None Concept Paper Allowed/Not allowed to Project Paper continue with the study Proposal Writing Project Paper Concept Paper Project Paper Proposal Acceptance of the Proposal Proposal Writing Chap. 1-3 Appendices Project Paper Project Paper Proposal Accept or not accepted by Proposal Chap. 1-6 the Adviser Submission Appendices Final Project Submission of Project Final Project Paper Accept with Revisions Paper Defense Paper Proposal Document Not Accepted Presentation For project paper with software,  running software  Technical Manual  User‟s Manual4. Duties and ResponsibilitiesThe development and defense of the project paper involves the following key parties.4.1 The Project Paper ProponentThe project paper proponent will be composed of only four members/students and have the followingresponsibilities:a. Keep informed of the Project Paper Guidelines and Policies.b. Keep informed of the schedule of project paper activities, required deliverables and deadlines posted by Thesis Coordinator.c. Submit on time all deliverables specified in this document as well as those to be specified by the Thesis Coordinator.d. Submit on time all requirements identified by the project paper defense panel during the defense.e. Submit on time the requirements identified by the project paper adviser throughout the duration of the project.f. Schedule regular meetings (at least twice a month) with the project paper adviser throughout the duration of the project paper. The meetings serve as a venue for the proponent to report the progress of their work, as well as raise any issues or concerns. Page 5
    • Project Paper Guidelines4.2 The Project Paper AdviserEach project paper proponents are assigned to one adviser, who should be a faculty member of theDepartment of Information Technology of the Institute of Arts and Sciences. In special cases, the advisercan come from another department of the College, provided that the selection criteria discussed in thenext section is observed.4.2.1 SelectionThe adviser will be chosen by the faculty handling IT realted subjects, recommended to the DepartmentChair for final approval, from the pool of IT faculty based on the following factors:a. the faculty member‟s research area and projects;b. the thesis/project paper advising and administrative load of the faculty4.2.2 ResponsibilitiesThe adviser has the following responsibilities:a. Meet the project paper proponent regularly (at least once a month) to answer questions and help resolve impasses and conflicts. In cases of failed attempts to resolve the issue, a letter detailing, and justifying his/her decision must be submitted to the Thesis Coordinator.b. Ensure that the project paper is feasible. The project paper adviser sees to it that the objectives, scope/limitations and methodology of the project are well-defined.c. Personally conducting (or has conducted) research in parallel with his/her advisees on the project paper topic. The adviser must be familiar with the topic to be able to give sound advice to his/her advisees.d. Point out errors in the development work, in the analysis, or in the documentation. The adviser must remind the proponent to do their work properly.e. Review thoroughly all deliverables at every stage of the project paper, to ensure that they meet the department‟s standards. The adviser may also require his/her project paper proponent to submit progress reports regularly.f. Recommend the proponent for oral defense. The adviser should not sign the Application for Final Project Paper Defense Form if he/she believes that the proponent is not yet ready for oral defense.g. Clarify points during the oral defense.h. Ensure that all required revisions are incorporated into the appropriate documents and/or software.i. Keep informed of the schedule of project paper activities, required deliverables and deadlines.The adviser can also request, on behalf of the proponent, for the modification or elimination of certainrevisions/requirements and defend such requests before the final verdict is issued.The adviser is not expected to check the English spelling and grammar of the project paper document.A faculty member assigned to be the adviser of a particular project paper proponent would remain in thatcapacity for as long as he/she is a faculty member of the Institute. If the faculty member goes on leave,he/she may continue to serve as the adviser, or may pass the advisorship to another faculty member.4.3 The Project Paper Defense PanelEach project paper proponent will have a project paper defense panel, which is composed of three facultymembers of the Department/Institute.4.3.1 SelectionPage 6
    • BSAMIT ProgramIn special cases, a panelist may come from an external unit. The panel members are chosen by the ThesisCoordinator based on the following constraints:a. At least one of the panelists is a senior faculty member whose research area is the area the project paper falls under,b. At least two of the panelists belong to the research area under which the project paper falls; andc. The project paper adviser will be part of the panel, however the adviser has the option to decline the role.The composition of the defense panel must be retained, as much as possible, throughout all the stages ofthe project paper.4.3.2 ResponsibilitiesThe project paper defense panel has the following responsibilities:a. Validate the endorsement of the project paper adviser.b. Evaluate the deliverables.c. Recommend a verdict.d. Consider the requests of the project paper adviser and/or the proponent.The lead panelist has the following responsibilities:a. Brief the project paper proponent about the defense program during the actual defense.b. Issue the verdict. The verdict is a unanimous decision among the three members of the project paper defense panel. Once issued, it is final and irrevocable.4.4 The Thesis CoordinatorThe Thesis Coordinator has the following responsibilities:a. Announce research areas (at the start of the each semester) to the students;b. Conduct general meetings with the students to discuss the Project Paper Guidelines, Policies and Deliverables, and to allow the students to raise and clarify issues;c. Select a project paper defense panel for each project paper proponent based on the guidelines in Section 4.3;d. Schedule project paper activities, such as the deadlines of deliverables and defense sessions.e. Post schedules, defense guidelines, requirements guidelines, and other announcements;f. Furnish every member of the defense panel with all the necessary project paper documents before the defense;g. File at least one copy of the defense panel‟s evaluation (including revisions) and the Revised and Approved Deliverables at every stage of the project paper.h. Streamline procedures.5. Document FormatThe margin of the document should be the default MS Word margin. The font used for the entiredocument must be Times New Roman with a point size of eleven (11). Paragraphs must be single-spacedand in-between paragraphs are double-spaced.5.1 Project Paper Proposal Outline and Contents Title Page i (but does not appear) Page 7
    • Project Paper Guidelines Abstract iii From 150 to 200 words of short, direct and complete sentences, the abstract should be informative enough to serve as a substitute for reading the project paper itself. It states the rationale and the objectives of the project. Do not put citations or quotes in this section. Avoid beginning the abstract with “This paper/document/project/study/project/…” Table of Contents iv Observe the following format: 1.0 Project Description 1 1.1 Overview of the Current State of Technology 2 1.2 Project Objectives … 1.2.1 General Objective … 1.2.2 Specific Objectives … … List of Tables … (roman numeral) List of Figures … Note that the page numbering for preliminary pages like title page, etc. is based on roman numerals while the page numbering for main body of the document is based on decimal numbers. Thus the first page of Chapter 1 is at 1. 1.0 Project Description 1.1 Overview of the Current State of Technology/Background of the Study This section gives the reader an overview of the specific technology or field in the international or local setting. The information regarding the technology or field should be contemporary and not based on outdated sources. Discussion must not be too technical or too detailed. This section ends with a discussion on the problems faced by or that still exist in the specific technology or field (e.g., limitations of existing software or algorithms). The problem statement would lead to the project objectives. 1.2 Project Objectives 1.2.1 General Objective This section states the over-all goal that must be achieved to answer the problem. 1.2.2 Specific Objectives This subsection is an elaboration of the general objective. It states the specific steps that must be undertaken to accomplish the general objective. These objectives must be specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, time-bounded. Each specific objective may start with “to design/survey/review/analyze…” Studying a particular programming language or development tool (e.g., to study Windows/Object- Oriented/Graphics/C++ programming) to accomplish the general objective is inherent in all project paper and, therefore, must not be included here.Page 8
    • BSAMIT Program1.3 Scope and Limitations of the ProjectThis section discusses the boundaries (with respect to the objectives) of the project and theconstraints within which the project will be developed.1.4 Significance of the ProjectThis section explains why project must be done in this area. It rationalizes the objective of the projectwith that of the stated problem. Avoid including here sentences such as “This project will bebeneficial to the proponent/department/college” as this is already an inherent requirement of allprojects. Focus on the project‟s contribution to the filed of Information Technology.2.0 Review of Related LiteratureThis section discusses the features, capabilities, and limitations of existing work, algorithms, orsoftware that are related/similar to the project. The reviewed works and software must be arrangedeither in chronological order, or by area (from general to specific). Observe a consistent format whenpresenting each of the reviewed works.3.0 Technical BackgroundThis section discusses and presents different sets of diagrams and charts pertaining to the softwareproject that is being develop by the proponents.4.0 Project MethodologyThis section lists and discusses the specific steps and activities that will be performed by theproponent to accomplish the project. The discussion covers the activities from pre-proposal to FinalProject Paper Writing. This section also includes an initial discussion on the theoretical framework tobe followed.Examples of activities include inquiry, survey, brainstorming, canvassing, consultation, review,interview, observe, experiment, design, test, document, etc. The methodology also includes thefollowing information: who is responsible for the task the resource person to be contacted what will be done when and how long will the activity be done where will it be done why should be activity be doneA Gantt chart showing the schedule of the activities should be included as a table. For example: ACTIVITY JAN FEB MAR APR … Data Gathering **** ** Software Requirements Analysis **** **** **** Initial Architectural Design ** Page 9
    • Project Paper Guidelines References (see Section 5.3) Appendix A. Diagrams and other documentation tools May consist of proposed architectural design, algorithms, Data Flow Diagrams, Fishbone Appendix B. Theoretical and/or Conceptual Framework Discusses the basic framework/foundation the project paper is based on. This section is normally referred to when discussing Scope and Limitations, and Research Methodology … Appendix …. Resource Persons For each resource person: <full name and title, e.g., Dr. Juan de la Cruz> <profession, e.g., faculty> <department, e.g., College of Computer Studies> <name of institution, e.g., De La Salle University> <e-mail address>5.2 Project Paper Document Outline and Contents Title Page Acknowledgement* Abstract Table of Contents List of Tables List of Figures 1.0 Project Description 1.1 Overview of the Current State of Technology (Project Paper Proposal 1.1) 1.2 Project Objectives (Project Paper Proposal 1.2) 1.3 Scope and Limitations of the Project (Project Paper Proposal 1.3) 1.4 Significance of the Project (Project Paper Proposal 1.4) 2.0 Review of Related Literature Part of the contents of this section is lifted from Chapter 2 of the Project Paper Proposal. Additional materials gathered during Project Paper Writing stages must also be included. 3.0 Theoretical/Conceptual Framework This section discusses the theories and concepts to be used in the course of designing or developing the project. Include only those concepts that you feel will be needed. Do not copy the whole source material. Use the topics stated in the Project Paper Proposal Objectives as a guide in determining the contents of this section. 4.0 The <XYZ> System* To be submitted in the final project paper document only.Page 10
    • BSAMIT Program This section gives the overall specifications and functional requirements of the software to be developed. 4.1 System Overview This section gives an overall view of the main features and capabilities of the software. 4.2 System Objectives This section states the specific requirements that must be met by the system. 4.3 System Functions This section provides a listing of all the functions that must be performed or delivered by the system, and a description of each. Screen designs may be included, to help visualize the function being discussed. Usually, the functions are based on the menu and toolbar options. If a function generates reports, the report formats must be included in this section. 4.4 System Scope and Limitations This section discusses the scope and limitations (i.e., the level of capability or extent of power) of each major function listed in 4.2 and 4.3. This means that operations, which are beyond the identified limits, will simply be invalidated/ignored, and will not cause the system to malfunction, but instead cause the system to respond with error messages. Justifications for the identified limitations and assumptions must be included here. Assumptions are the conditions that must be satisfied or things that must be existing/available/followed in order for the system to function properly. Ignoring such assumptions might result in system malfunction, which will not be the responsibility of the proponent. 4.5 Physical Environment and Resources This section discusses the hardware and software resources needed to implement and to execute the system. If the system has a special set of target users, this section also includes the user specification (e.g., educational level, experience, and technical expertise). For certain uncommon resources, a discussion of why such resources are necessary must also be included. 4.6 Architectural Design This section presents the initial internal design of the system, by discussing its major components and their interactions. These components include the software components (e.g., modules, database systems, etc.), as well as the hardware components (e.g., processors, devices, etc.). The components and their interactions are graphically represented using design tools, such as hierarchical charts, structure charts or object models. Data flow diagrams may also be included to show how information passes among processes. In addition, discussion on why certain alternative and trade-offs were chosen must be included (e.g., issues on software decomposition, cost of hardware). 5.0 Design and Implementation Issues** To be submitted in the final project paper document only. Page 11
    • Project Paper Guidelines This section discusses the design and implementation of the major data structures and algorithms used in the software. It included a discussion on the major issues and problems encountered, and the corresponding solutions and alternatives employed by the proponent. Parts of the design tools in the Technical Manual may be lifted as figures in this section. 6.0 Results and Observations* This section presents the analysis, interpretation and implications of the summarized test results, as well as observations on the limits of the system‟s capabilities. It also discusses the type(s) of testing performed on the system, the test data used, and the results of the tests. The type(s) of tests performed varies depending on the system developed. For instance, a commissioned software would require a detailed acceptance test and system response time analysis, while a software implementing an algorithm would require an analysis of the performance of the algorithm on different machines or on different test data. 7.0 Conclusion and Recommendations* This chapter gives an assessment of what happened in this project. It presents explanations and justifications on how the objectives of the project were met, to what extent and why some objectives were not met. This chapter also includes a discussion of possible improvements that can be made on the software, as well as future directions of the project in general. This serves as a springboard for projects that may be done by future project proponent. References (see Section 5.3) Appendix A Diagrams Appendix B … Appendix … Resource Persons (follow the format in the Project Paper Proposal) Appendix … Personal Vitae (follow the format in the Project Paper Proposal) TECHNICAL MANUAL (see Section 5.4)* USER’S MANUAL (see Section 5.5)* CONFERENCE PAPER (follow ACM Style)* if deemed necessary by the adviserPage 12
    • BSAMIT Program5.3 Format for References, Citations, and QuotationsThe following discussions are based from the American Psychological Association (APA) format*.5.3.1 Handling Quotations in your TextWhen using APA format, the author-date method of citation is being followed. This means that theauthors last name and the year of publication for the source should appear in the text, and a completereference should appear in the reference list.Examples: Smith (1970) compared reaction times . . . In a recent study of reaction times (Smith, 1970), . . . ** In 1970, Smith compared reaction times . . . Smith, et.al., (1970) compared reaction times . . . In a recent study of reaction times (Smith, et.al., 1970), . . . ** In 1970, Smith, et.al., compared reaction times . . .5.3.2 Short QuotationsTo indicate short quotations (fewer than 40 words) in your text, enclose the quotation within doublequotation marks. Provide the author, year, and specific page citation in the text, and include a completereference in the reference list. Punctuation marks such as periods, commas, and semicolons should appearafter the parenthetical citation. Question marks and exclamation points should appear within the quotationmarks if they are a part of the quotation but after the parenthetical citation if they are a part of your text.Examples: She stated, "The placebo effect disappeared when behaviors were studied in this manner" (Miele, 1993, p. 276), but she did not clarify which behaviors were studied.** According to Miele (1993), "the placebo effect disappeared when behaviors were studied in this manner" (p. 276). Miele (1993) found that "the placebo effect disappeared" in this case (p. 276), but what will the next step in researching this issue be?5.3.3 Long QuotationsPlace quotations longer than 40 words in a free-standing block of typewritten lines, and omit quotationmarks. Start the quotation on a new line, indented five spaces from the left margin. Type the entirequotation on the new margin, and indent the first line of any subsequent paragraph within the quotationfive spaces from the new margin. Maintain double-spacing throughout. If you choose to use single-spacing, then it has to be consistent all throughout the document/essay. The parenthetical citation shouldcome after closing punctuation mark.* From the book entitled The Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (4 th Edition)** Highly recommended to use. Page 13
    • Project Paper GuidelinesExample: Mieles 1993 study found the following: The placebo effect disappeared when behaviors were studied in this manner. Furthermore, the behaviors were never exhibited again, even when real drugs were administered. Earlier studies conducted by the same group of researchers at the hospital were clearly premature in attributing the results to a placebo effect. (p. 276)5.3.4 Reference ListThe reference list should appear at the end of your document. It provides the information necessary for areader to locate and retrieve any source you cite in the document. The reference list is arrangedalphabetically regardless of its sources. Each source you cite in the document must appear in yourreference list; likewise, each entry in the reference list must be cited in your text. Note that online sourcesare highly discouraged and kept to a minimum.Basic Rules Authors names are inverted (last name first); give last name and initials for all authors of a particular work. Your reference list should be alphabetized by authors last names. If you have more than one work by a particular author, order them by publication date, oldest to newest (thus a 1991 article would appear before a 1996 article). When an author appears as a sole author and as the first author of a group, list the one-author entries first. If no author is given for a particular source, alphabetize by the title of the piece and use a shortened version of the title for parenthetical citations. Use "&" instead of "and" when listing multiple authors of a single work. Each item in the reference list should be hanging indent. All references should be single-spaced. Each entry is separated from the next by a double space. Capitalize only the first word of a title or subtitle of a work. Underline titles of books and journals. Note that the underlining in entries often continues beneath commas and periods.5.3.5 Basic Forms for Sources in Print5.3.5.1 An article in a periodical (such as a journal, proceedings, newspaper, or magazine)Author, A. A., Author, B. B., & Author, C. C. (Year of Publication, add month and of publication for daily, weekly, or monthly publications). Title of article. Title of periodical, Volume Number, pages.N.B. You need list only the volume number if the periodical uses continuous pagination throughout aparticular volume. If each issue begins with page 1, then you should list the issue number as well: Title ofPeriodical, Volume (Issue), pages.Examples:Journal article, one authorHarlow, H. F. (1983). Fundamentals for preparing psychology journal articles. Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 55, 893-896.Journal article, more than one authorKernis, M. H., Cornell, D. P., Sun, C. R., Berry, A., & Harlow, T. (1993). Theres more to self-esteem than whether it is high or low: The importance of stability of self-esteem. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 65, 1190-1204.Page 14
    • BSAMIT ProgramConference proceedingsOrasan, C. & Krishnamurthy R. (2000). An Open Architecture for the Construction and Administration of Corpora. In: Proceedings of the Second International Conference on Language Resources and Evaluation (LREC-2000), pp. 22-29.Work discussed in a secondary sourceColtheart, M., Curtis, B., Atkins, P., & Haller, M. (1993). Models of reading aloud: Dual-route and parallel-distributed-processing approaches. Psychological Review, 100, 589-608.N.B. Give the secondary source in the references list; in the text, name the original work, and give acitation for the secondary source. For example, if Seidenberg and McClellands work is cited in Coltheartet al. and you did not read the original work, list the Coltheart et al. reference in the References. In thetext, use the following citation: Seidenberg and McClellands study (as cited in Coltheart, Curtis, Atkins,& Haller, 1993)Magazine article, one authorHenry, W. A., III. (1990, April 9). Making the grade in todays schools. Time, 135, 28-31.5.3.5.2 A non periodical (such as a book, report, brochure, or audiovisual media)Author, A. A. (Year of Publication). Title of work: Capital letter also for subtitle. Location: Publisher.N.B. For "Location," you should always list the city, but you should also include the state if the city isunfamiliar or if the city could be confused with one in another state.Examples:BookCalfee, R. C., & Valencia, R. R. (1991). APA guide to preparing manuscripts for journal publication. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.A government publicationNational Institute of Mental Health. (1990). Clinicaltraining in serious mental illness (DHHS Publication No. ADM 90-1679). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.A book or article with no author or editor namedMerriam-Websters collegiate dictionary (10th ed.). (1993). Springfield, MA: Merriam-Webster.New drug appears to sharply cut risk of death from heart failure. (1993, July 15). The Washington Post, p. A12.N.B. For parenthetical citations of sources with no author named, use a shortened version of the titleinstead of an authors name. Use quotation marks and underlining as appropriate. For example,parenthetical citations of the two sources above would appear as follows: (Merriam-Websters, 1993) and("New Drug," 1993).A translated work and/or a republished workLaplace, P. S. (1951). A philosophical essay on probabilities (F. W. Truscott & F. L. Emory, Trans.). New York: Dover. (Original work published 1814) Page 15
    • Project Paper GuidelinesA review of a book, film, television program, etc.Baumeister, R. F. (1993). Exposing the self-knowledge myth [Review of the book The self-knower: A hero under control]. Contemporary Psychology, 38, 466-467.An entry in an encyclopediaBergmann, P. G. (1993). Relativity. In The new encyclopedia britannica (Vol. 26, pp. 501-508). Chicago: Encyclopedia Britannica.5.3.5.3 Part of a non-periodical (such as a book chapter or an article in a collection)Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Year of Publication). Title of chapter. In A. Editor & B. Editor (Eds.), Title of book (pages of chapter). Location: Publisher.N.B. When you list the pages of the chapter or essay in parentheses after the book title, use "pp." beforethe numbers: (pp. 1-21). This abbreviation, however, does not appear before the page numbers inperiodical references.Example:An article or chapter of a bookONeil, J. M., & Egan, J. (1992). Mens and womens gender role journeys: Metaphor for healing, transition, and transformation. In B. R. Wainrib (Ed.), Gender issues across the life cycle (pp. 107-123). New York: Springer.5.3.6 Basic Forms for Electronic Sources5.3.6.1 A web pageAuthor, A. A. (Date of Publication or Revision). Title of full work [online]. Available: full web address. (Date of access).N.B. "Date of access" should indicate the date you visited the website. This is important because onlineinformation is frequently altered.Example:Daly, B. (1997). Writing argumentative essays. [online]. Available: http://www.eslplanet.com/teachertools/argueweb/frntpage.htm. (May 12, 1998)5.3.6.2 An online journal or magazineAuthor, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of Publication). Title of article. In Title of full work [online]. Available: full web address (Date of access).Example:Kenneth, I. (1995). A Buddhist response to the nature of human rights. [9 pars.] Journal of Buddhist Ethics [online serial], 2. Available: http://www.cac.psu.edu/jbe/twocont.html. (June 15, 1998)Page 16
    • BSAMIT Program5.3.6.3 EmailBecause e-mail is a personal communication, not easily retrieved by the general public, no entry appearsin your reference list. When you cite an email message in the body of your paper, acknowledge it in yourparenthetical citation: The novelist has repeated this idea recently (Salman Rushdie, email to author, May1, 1995).Example:The Publication Manual of the APA provides extensive examples covering a wide variety of potentialsources. Below are some of the most commonly cited kinds of sources. If your particular source is notlisted below, use the basic forms (above) to determine the correct format, check the Publication Manual,or call or email the Writing Lab for help at (765) 494-3723 or owl@cc.purdue.edu. (Many of theseexamples are taken from the Publication Manual.)5.3.7 A Note on Footnotes and EndnotesBecause long explanatory notes can be distracting to readers, most academic style guidelines (includingMLA and APA) recommend limited use of footnotes/endnotes. An exception is Chicago-styledocumentation, which relies on notes for all citations as well as explanatory notes. But even in that case,extensive discursive notes are discouraged. Proper use of notes would include:1. Evaluative bibliographic comments, for example: 1 See Blackmur (1995), especially chapters three and four, for an insightful analysis of this trend. 2 On the problems related to repressed memory recovery, see Wollens (1989) pp. 120-35; for a contrasting view, see Pyle (1992).2. Occasional explanatory notes or other brief additional information that would seem digressive if included in the main text but might be interesting to readers, for example: 3 In a recent interview, she reiterated this point even more strongly: "I am an artist, not a politician!" (Weller, 1998, p. 124).Footnotes in APA format are indicated by consecutive superscript arabic numbers in the text. The notesthemselves are listed by consecutive superscript arabic numbers and appear double-spaced in regularparagraph format (a new paragraph for each note) on a separate page under the word Footnotes (centered,in plain text without quotation marks). Page 17
    • Project Paper Guidelines5.4 Technical ManualFor those using the object-oriented methodology, kindly use the following CLASS DICTIONARYFORMAT for your technical manual.For each class that you have created: CLASS SUPERCLASS PROPERTIES 1. <property name> -- <purpose and constraint> 2. 3. METHODS 1. <method name> -- <description, parameters, result type, and constraint> 2.If you are creative enough, you may want to come up with your own table format. Just make sure that youhave the minimum requirements outlined above for each class.The design and implementation issues of your class‟ methods are discussed in the Design andImplementation chapter (which can include the pseudocode). There is no pseudocode needed in yourTechnical Manual, nor are you required to do IPO.For each function used from an existing library, kindly explain them in your Theoretical Frameworkchapter.You may also choose other tools, notations and diagrams that apply best to your developmentmethodology if object-oriented methodology is not suitable.5.5 User’s ManualAll software systems are required by the SOFTDEV Course to have an ONLINE HELP and a USER‟SMANUAL.Most of the contents of the User‟s Manual are based from chapter 4 of the main project paper document(specifically on the system functions and features). The difference lies in the manner of presentation.Chapter 4 of the main project paper document is oriented towards highly technical systems designer, thusit gives an overview of the major modules of the system and their interactions.On the other hand, the User‟s Manual is oriented towards end users, who might be naïve users.Therefore, it gives a detailed step-by-step instruction on how to use each function and feature of thesystem.The suggested outline of the User‟s Manual is as follows: Title Page (see Section xxx, but add the line USER’S MANUAL below the project paper title) Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction This section gives an overview of the system. It includes the following subsections:Page 18
    • BSAMIT Program1.1 System RequirementsThis section lists the minimum hardware and software requirements needed to properly execute thesystem.1.2 InstallationThis subsection contains instructions on how to install the system, and the list necessary files and theirrespective directories.1.3 ConventionThis subsection presents the convention used in the manual, e.g., text in boldface for emphasis onimportant concepts, text in italics are inputs from the users, etc.2.0 Getting StartedThis section tarts with instructions on how to run the system, and the initial screen that will bedisplayed. It then explains the major components of the system, e.g., tool bars, menu options, statusbar, etc.3.0 <Module / Feature 1>Succeeding sections, from 3.0 to N-1, focus on the major modules or features of the system. Eachsection contains detailed instructions on how to use the particular modules, the available features andlimitations of the module.…N.0. MessagesThis section lists all system messages – error message, status message, information, and instructionmessage – that the user may encounter while using the system. For each message, include a briefdescription and the possible courses of action that the user may take in response to the message.Below is a sample format: <Message Text> Description: Action:The messages must be arranged in ascending order, and may be grouped into subsections (e.g., N.1Error Messages, N.2 Status Messages, etc.). Page 19
    • Project Paper Guidelines6. Forms6.1 Title Page <Title of Project Paper> A Project Paper [Proposal] Presented to the Faculty of the Institute of Arts and Sciences Department of Information Technology Far Eastern University - Manila In Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of <Program Name> Bachelor of Science in Applied Mathematics with Information Technology by <lastname, firstname, middle initial of proponents> <adviser‟s signature> <adviser‟s name> Faculty Adviser <date of submission>Page 20
    • BSAMIT Program6.2 Project Paper Proposal Approval SheetThe approval sheet is only printed upon submission of the final copy of the project paper proposal. This isto be signed by the adviser. APPROVAL SHEET This Project Paper Proposal hereto entitled: < Project Paper Proposal Title> prepared and submitted by <proponent‟s names> in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of <program name> has been examined, accepted and approved. <Name of Adviser> Adviser Page 21
    • Project Paper Guidelines6.3 Final Project Paper Approval SheetThe approval sheet is only printed upon submission of the final copy of the project paper. This is to besigned first by the adviser, panel members and finally by the Thesis Coordinator and the Program Head. APPROVAL SHEET This project hereto entitled: <Project Paper Title> prepared and submitted by <researcher‟s names> in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of <program name> has been examined and is recommended for acceptance and approval for ORAL EXAMINATION. <Name of Adviser> Adviser Approved by the Committee on Oral Examination with a grade of PASSED on <date>. <name of panel chair> Chair <name of panel member> <name of panel member> Member Member Accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of <program name>. <Name of the Thesis Coordinator> <Name of Head> Program Head Department of MathematicsPage 22
    • BSAMIT Program6.4 Final Project Paper Defense Evaluation SheetThe evaluation sheet is given by the thesis coordinator to the panel before the defense. INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS FINAL PROJECT PAPER DEFENSE EVALUATION SHEETProject Paper Title: Proponent: Contact No. Deadline of Revision  for acceptance Adviser Venue Date  for approval Panel Members Signature Recommendations: [ ] Accept with Revisions [ ] Not Accepted Revisions Page # on the revised documentThe proponent must indicate the page # in the appropriate column in which the revisions can be found inthe revised document.Actions on the evaluation sheet:1. Revisions will be listed by the lead panel upon presentation of verdict to the proponent.2. Evaluation sheet will be forwarded to the department secretary and a photocopy will be given to the proponent.3. The proponent shall indicate on the “page #” column the page number in which the panel members can locate the actual revision during final approval. Page 23
    • Project Paper Guidelines6.5 Final Project Paper Defense Approval FormThe approval form is attached as the cover page of a revised project paper document for approval. Thisform is secured from the thesis coordinator after the defense. INSTITUTE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN APPLIED MATHEMATICS FINAL PROJECT PAPER DEFENSE APPROVAL SHEETFinal Project Paper Title: Proponent: Contact No. Defended Submitted  for acceptance Accepted/Approved Adviser  for approval Signature Date Remarks Checked Approved Panel Members Signature Date Signature DateRecommendation of Lead Panel: [ ] Accepted [ ] Revise and recheck by all panel members [ ] Revise and recheck by (please specify) Revisions Page # on the revised document This serves as the cover page of the revised document. Adviser must approve the revisions before its presentation to the panel. Otherwise panel members must not accept the revisions unless otherwise indicated in the revision sheet. Panel members sign either in the checked column indicating it has been checked or the approved indicating final approval. The lead panel is the last to sign and give the final recommendation.Actions on the approval form:1. Project Paper adviser must approve the revisions before the revised document is passed to the panel members;2. Panel members shall evaluate whether required revisions were complied, if not, additional revisions may be required;3. The lead panel shall be the last to evaluate and give the final recommendation;4. If the recommendation is to revise further the document, the proponent shall indicate on the “page #” column the page number in which the panel members can locate the actual revisions during final approval and another iteration of approval will be made.Page 24
    • BSAMIT Program6.6 Final Project Paper Defense Proponent Guidelines1. The Project Paper Defense normally takes 1 hour. Limit your presentation to 30 minutes.2. Normally the presentation consists of the following: brief introduction objectives scope and limitation design and implementation software demonstration and results conclusion and recommendations3. The panel will ask you to step out for initial deliberation (normally 10 minutes), after which you will be motioned back for questions and answers (normally 10 minutes).4. The panel will ask you to step out for final deliberation (normally 5 minutes), after which you will be motioned back for the final verdict and your clarification of the verdict (normally 5 minutes).If the verdict is Accept with Revisions1. Photocopy the Revision Sheet and return the original to the Thesis Coordinator.2. Comply with the revision within (1) weeks unless otherwise stated. Please note of the University deadline for submitting the approved project paper document (normally 3 weeks before finals).3. Submit the revised document to the Thesis Coordinator with the Approval Sheet as cover page and Evaluation Sheet as second page. Complete it with your contact number and page number where the revisions are found on the Revision Sheet.4. Follow-up within three (3) days if the panel finally approves it without revision. Otherwise you go back to Step 2. Note, you are not considered done if you did not receive approval from all panel members.5. Submit a hard bound (green) approved project paper document to the Thesis Coordinator‟s Office. Also submit a separate Project Paper Approval Sheet, softcopy of the project in CDs to the Office of the Thesis Coordinator before the deadline and complete all document requirements.If the verdict is Not Accepted1. Photocopy the Revision Sheet and return the original to the Thesis Coordinator.2. Prepare anew your proposal and start from the stage of proposal defense. Page 25