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Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
Hist 5 ways of the world
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Hist 5 ways of the world

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  • 1. Ways of the World: People and Events That Changed the Globe By: Erik Ruiz
  • 2. Ch. 17 The French Revolution (1789-1815) <ul><li>The French Revolution was more violent and cataclysmic for the country than the American Revolution proved to be. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1793 King Louis XVI and the queen, were executed through beheading. This act of regicide shocked traditionalist throughout Europe. </li></ul><ul><li>Napoleon taking control in 1815 ended the long revolution, but its ideas began to spread around the world. </li></ul>The storming of the Bastille (1789)
  • 3. Ch. 17: Haitian Revolution (1791-1804) <ul><li>Haiti was regarded as one of the richest colonies of the time and consisted of over 500,000 slaves, with only 40,000 whites and even less mixed race. </li></ul><ul><li>The Revolution was led by Toussaint Louverture. The slaves fought the odds, and even the mighty Napoleon, and in 1804 the first ever successful slave revolt became an independent nation. </li></ul><ul><li>This revolt inspired other nearby slave revolts like in Jamaica, unfortunately these were crushed by other European powers. </li></ul>
  • 4. Ch. 17: Spanish-American Revolutions <ul><li>Simon Bolivar to the right (Revolutionary hero in Venezuela) </li></ul><ul><li>These Latin American Revolutions were influenced in parts by the American, French and Haitian revolutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Many of these revolutions led to independence, but there was very little change to societal issues. </li></ul>
  • 5. Ch. 18: The Industrial Revolution <ul><li>The Industrial Revolution started in Western Europe and influenced many changes all over the world through the 19 th and early 20 th centuries. </li></ul><ul><li>Historians believe Western Europe, which really had no advantages over China or the Middle East in terms of technology and production, hit the revolution first due to perhaps the focus on innovation over so many neighboring European powers. </li></ul>
  • 6. Ch. 18: Why Great Britain? <ul><li>Historians believe Great Britain hit the Revolution first because of its many densely packed coal mines and iron ore fields, and dense populations. Great Britain, basically an island fortress, was not ravaged by the many European Wars of the 18 th and 19 th centuries and therefore had more resources at hand and focus. </li></ul>
  • 7. Ch: 18: The US revolution with no Socialism <ul><li>The US’s Industrial Revolution was different to its European counter parts. Where Europe came about with huge social divisions, the United States’s and its problem with racism, did not allow for a grouping of these same social classes against the higher classes and fighting. </li></ul>
  • 8. Ch. 19: China <ul><li>China’s crisis began with its earlier success and a massive population growth. Due to this and the lack of an Industrial Revolution, agriculture alone could not support the exploding population. </li></ul>
  • 9. Ch. 19: “The Sick Man of Europe” <ul><li>By 1914 the Ottoman Empire was less than half of what it was for hundreds of years before. This was due to embarrassing losses to the British, French, and other European powers. </li></ul>
  • 10. Ch. 19: The Rise of Japan <ul><li>In 1853, American Navy ships entered Tokyo Bay and forcefully demanded that Japan open it self to the world. This would trigger events that would industrialize Japan and by the early 20 th century, make it an East Asian imperialist world power. </li></ul>
  • 11. Ch. 20: European Conquests in Asia <ul><li>As the 20 th century began, most of Asia was colonized or controlled economically by major world powers. The British held India, Burma, and Bhutan, as well as heavy influence in China. France held Indochina, the Dutch had the East Indies and Japan was slowly expanding its sphere of imperialism and control. </li></ul>
  • 12. Ch. 20: Colonial Africa <ul><li>By the 1914 the French held a vast majority of North Western Africa and the island of Madagascar. The British had most of the Southern tip and the East, the Belgian held the large Congo region. Ethiopia was the only large independent region that defeated the Italians in 1896. </li></ul>
  • 13. Ch. 20: Cooperation <ul><li>Violent insurrections were common in colonial life, but there were many groups and individuals that cooperated with colonial authorities to their own advantage. </li></ul><ul><li>Many people found security, status, and employment in European led armed forces. This was the case for many Indians and Muslims of the high class to keep their status and have some control at the local level. </li></ul>
  • 14. Ch. 21: War is Coming <ul><li>In 1914 World War I was initiated with the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand of Austria by a Serb nationalist. Russia came to Serbia’s aid, and with this joined Britain and France who declared war on Austria-Hungary and their German and Italian allies. </li></ul>
  • 15. Ch. 21: The War to End All Wars <ul><li>World War I brought about the horrors of trench warfare. Waves of men would charge the lines only to be mowed down by the newly invented weapon, the machine gun. </li></ul><ul><li>Both sides were incredible defended miles of trenches occupied by divisions of men and artillery acting as a virtual shield. It was common to only gain a few hundred feet and only to loose to the enemy the day later. </li></ul>
  • 16. Ch. 21: The Outcome of WW I <ul><li>World War 1 ravaged Europe and its losers, were punished. </li></ul><ul><li>Austria-Hungary was divided, Germany, once a feared power, was left in debt and weak. The Ottoman Empire lost a vast majority of its land in the Middle East and was a just another nail in the coffin for the aging empire of old. </li></ul><ul><li>On the winning side, parts of France were left ruined. Russia left the war early and went through revolution ending with a Communist take over and an end to the Czardom. </li></ul><ul><li>All of these issues led to a lot of national frustration and hatred and would lead to political reforms and take over that would lead to the even bigger conflict, World War 2. </li></ul>
  • 17. Ch. 22: The Bolsheviks Take Power <ul><li>The communists led by Lenin took power in 1917 following a revolutionary upheaval that took place in just one year, 1917. World War 1 had been going poorly for Russia, who had yet to heavily industrialize, their resources were running incredibly slim and millions were in severe poverty and/or starving. </li></ul><ul><li>Shortly after the end of a civil war against nationalists and other groups, the Bolsheviks renamed their nation, the Soviet Union (USSR). </li></ul>
  • 18. Ch. 22: China <ul><li>By the late 1930s, China’s biggest threat was the Japanese invading force. By 1938 they held most of the Northeast. </li></ul><ul><li>By 1949, Mao Zedong and the CCP emerged victorious over the Nationalists. </li></ul>
  • 19. Ch. 22: The Cold War <ul><li>Involve many satellite wars of which the US and Soviet Union fought each other indirectly. Was also a massive arms race. </li></ul><ul><li>The Vietnam War, Korean War, Cuban Missile Crisis, and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, were just many conflicts in which the US and Soviet Union fought each other indirectly. </li></ul>
  • 20. Ch. 23: Indian Independence <ul><li>Gandhi and the INC rose to popularity country wide with his reference to Hindu religious themes and supported Muslims. </li></ul><ul><li>After the British left right after World War 2, India was split into Hindu India, and to the west, Muslim Pakistan. </li></ul>
  • 21. Ch. 23: South Africa <ul><li>Nelson Mandela was released from prison in 1990. </li></ul><ul><li>The apartheid came to an end without the feared racial bloodbath people expected. </li></ul>
  • 22. Ch. 23: Iran <ul><li>After the crumbling of the Ottoman Empire, Iran arose as a Republic led by a General. </li></ul><ul><li>In 1979, the Shah was ousted and the Ayatollah Khomeini came, took over, and appointed his own government. </li></ul>
  • 23. Ch. 24: Population Growth <ul><li>Since 1950, the worlds population has nearly multiplied by 3. From 2.5 billion, to about 6.5 billion. </li></ul><ul><li>More than half of this comes from Asia alone. All other continents add up to less than half. </li></ul>

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