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Species interactions
 

Species interactions

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    Species interactions Species interactions Presentation Transcript

    • Species Interactions 5 major types of symbioses-Close interactions among species.
    • • Predator captures, kills, and consumes prey.• Determines relationships in food web.• Regulates population size.• Adaptation in predators and prey due to Natural Selection.
    • Mimicry
    • Herbivores are predators, plants prey!• Plants have defenses as well. Secondary compounds = toxic but can be medicinal.• Stinging Nettle Night Shade
    • Parasitism• Parasite benefits, host is harmed.• Ecto – outside Endo- inside
    • Mutualism• Both species benefit.
    • Commensalism• One species benefits, the other is “neutral”
    • Competition• Results from niche overlap- use of same limited resource by 2 or more SPECIES.• Competitive Exclusion – 1 species uses resource and other is eliminated (NS)• Character Displacement – Evolution of anatomical differences that reduce competition between similar species.• Resource Partitioning- reduced competition.
    • Competitive Exclusion
    • Character displacement
    • Succession- gradual sequential growth of species in an area• Primary Succession – Development of a community in an area that has not supported life previously.• Secondary Succession – DUH! Sequential replacement of species that follows a disruption of an existing community.• Pioneer Species – predominate early in succession, tend to be small, fast-growing, fast reproducing.• Climax community –DUH!