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EPC Group SharePoint 2010 Enterprise Content Management - ECM Best Practices - High Level Overview of the Top ECM SharePoint Practice in the U.S.

EPC Group SharePoint 2010 Enterprise Content Management - ECM Best Practices - High Level Overview of the Top ECM SharePoint Practice in the U.S.

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  • [Build Slide]What is enterprise collaboration?In today’s fast-paced, ever-changing world of business, enterprise collaboration is no longer just an optional afterthought – it’s a fundamental business capability that should form a foundational part of your IT strategy. Collaborative processes play a part in almost every part of your business – from research and marketing to development and customer service. A robust Collaboration Platform should be able to support connections across your business.[Note: A good way to explain each of these concepts is through a story or personal example]1. Connecting people to each other. With the increasing trend towards decentralization and enterprise globalization, keeping your people connected to each other and to your corporate culture and vision, as well as working together seamlessly has taken on new importance and challenges. Some valuable aspects of connecting people include: Anywhere, anytime communication channels with options for matching the message to the appropriate medium/channel. Some different types of communications include: 1-to-many communications, like announcements or publications 1-to-1 communications, like personal conversations and interviews Many-to-many communications, like discussion groups and meetingsYour collaboration platform should have the flexibility to match the communication types with the most appropriate technology and taking into account personal needs (remote workers, personal communication preferences). Personalization through self-expression, and reputation management Creating a sense of belonging and shared commitment to your company’s brand and mission Finding the right people faster with expertise transparency, and efficient taxonomies and search technology2. Connecting people to their best ideas. The collaborative exchange of ideas is the single most critical element of innovation. Providing a forum and processes for idea generation and for innovation to take place has become an important way for companies to create sustainable competitive advantage. By aggregating and correlating ideas from multiple sources and applying collective wisdom to achieve better results, companies can harness the collective creativity of their people and channel it towards improved processes, products, services and ultimately business results.3. Connecting people to the best information. Information is the currency of today’s workplace. Analysts estimates that 80% of business is conducted on unstructured information and the volume of unstructured information within an organization doubles every three months. As a result, navigating through this information overload, and providing the right information to the right people at the right time is critical to timely, accurate business decisions. Part of this strategy includes: Having visibility into organizational and Line of Business data which may reside in multiple proprietary applications and systems Being able to find what you need in any location or taxonomy grouping across information silos Having the content you need presented in the context of your work so it makes immediate sense Automatically managing security and access privileges to information across the organization Making sure the most current versions of content are easily discoverable4. Connecting organizations to their customers. In this age of User Generated Content (UGC) and increased digital participation, your customers are active stakeholders rather than passive consumers of your product or service. As a result, more and more companies are feeling the need to participate in a customer dialog through communities, blogs, discussion forums, support services, and other interactive channels. Collaborating with customers may seem like a foreign concept to a lot of companies, but the days of ivory tower corporations are giving way to a more open, cooperative business model, and the sooner your organization can adapt to these changes, the more likely you are to profit from them.5. Connecting organizations to each other. Market ecosystems have become increasingly complex – what used to be simple supply chains, have become webs of interdependence among suppliers, service providers, regulators, buyers, resellers and other partners. Very rarely can a company be completely independent, and often times it is the strength and efficiency of these B2B relationships that ensure profitability through closer collaborative partnerships.
  • [Build Slide]How do your people collaborate today?There are many traditional collaboration products and technologies your people use to work together today. Here are some of the most common, along with issues and limitations for each. [Note: Don’t have to go through each method– rather, give an example/story from your personal experience of a miscommunication, security violation, or lack of efficiency]Phone calls:Information exchanged can be difficult to capture and persist1:1 communication silos – hard to share information with othersTime zones can make calls unpracticalLanguage barriersE-mail:Not immediate – can create communication delays (recipients OOF)Can create hard-to-track message threadsEmail overload (spam) and size limitationsDocuments and assets shared through e-mail can lead to version control issuesFace-to-face meetings:Information shared can be difficult to capture and persistGeographic distancePeople dependencies/bottlenecks (vacation, turnover)Physical meeting inefficiencies (securing conference rooms, scheduling)Time zone differencesLanguage, cultural barriersFile shares:Version controlAuditing and complianceFinding the right information quicklyOrganizational problems (is this the right folder? How can I be sure?)Access permissions issuesVirus and security concernsPaper-based document storage:Document management and retrieval (e.g., difficult to reference and share) Difficult to search quicklySecurityDisaster recovery and backupAccess (geographic limitations)Messaging (IM, text, voice mail, etc.):Information shared can be difficult to capture and persist Multiple platforms can cause interoperability issues and lack of centralizationCommunication silosSecurity/IP policy issuesFaxes:ManagementVersion controlSecurity/IP policy issuesSame issues as paper-based document storageSocial Networking tools like Facebook, MySpace, Twitter:Security/IP policy issuesDisclosure concernsLack of integration with corporate IT systemsInformation shared can be difficult to capture and persist Inappropriate professional behavior and information sharedOverall Limitations/Challenges – Lack of consistent user experienceLack of standardized processesLack of security and controlMultiple versions of the truthDifficulty in finding the right information/person quicklyHaving to reinvent the wheel, duplicate work
  • Secure, Cost-Effective Collaboration SharePoint provides a single platform for secure collaboration in multiple scenarios even across organizational boundaries.Security and compliance: SharePoint supports fine-grained policy setting and enforcement of business rules. By specifying security settings, storage policies, auditing policies, and expiration actions for business records in accordance with compliance regulations, you can help ensure your sensitive business information can be controlled and managed effectively. Tight interfacing of Office SharePoint Server with familiar desktop applications means that policy settings are rendered onto client applications in the Microsoft Office system, making it simpler for employees to be aware of and comply with regulatory requirements.

EPC Group SharePoint 2010 Enterprise Content Management - ECM Best Practices Presentation Transcript

  • 1. EPC Group’s SharePoint 2010Enterprise Content Management (ECM) Best Practices – “High Level Overview”
  • 2. About EPC Group
    SharePoint 2010 and Project Server 2010 Offerings Include:
    Enterprise Content Management Systems based on Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010
    SharePoint 2010 (SharePoint Server 2010 SharePoint Foundation 2010) DoD Compliance Systems
    Intranet and Internet facing implementations (SharePoint Server 2010, SharePoint Foundation))
    Health Check and Assessment Initiatives – Preparing for SharePoint 2010 Phase 0 Approach
    SharePoint Support Contracts for Organizations throughout the U.S.
    Custom Application, Web Part, Security Models and Workflow Development
    Migration initiatives for SharePoint 2007 to 2010 or LiveLink, Documentum, FileNet to SP 2010
    KPI, Dashboard, and Reporting Solutions (Complete BI Solutions via PerformancePoint 2010)
    Tailored SharePoint Training (either onsite or remote)
    SharePoint Roadmap development: 6, 12, 18, and 24 months
    Enterprise Metadata Design Retention Schedule Development – True Records Management Experts
    Webpartgallery.com
  • 3. Presenter: Errin O’Connor
    • Founder & CEO of EPC Group.net
    • 4. One of the nation’s leading SharePoint implementation firms with over 650 successful SharePoint implementations
    • 5. Author with the EPC Group team: Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2010 – Inside Out
    • 6. Author of Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 Inside & Out by Microsoft Press
    • 7. Has completed 140+ SharePoint Implementations in the Past 10 years
    • 8. Has worked on some of the largest SharePoint deployments to date (400,000+ Users)
  • EPC Group Facts
    Founded in 1999- The Nation’s Oldest and Most Experienced SharePoint Integration Firm (Houston, Texas | Chicago, Illinois | Bethesda, Maryland | New York, New York)
    Microsoft Gold Certified Partner with Top SharePoint & Project Server Competencies
    Member of Microsoft SharePoint and Project Server TAP 2007 & 2010 Beta Test Programs
    Currently Executed over 600 SharePoint Engagements throughout the Globe
    History of executing some of the largest SharePoint Deployments in the history of Microsoft SharePoint
    Patent Pending SharePoint Implementation Methodologies
    Microsoft SharePoint Foundation 2010 Inside Out Dive in to Microsoft® SharePoint® Foundation 2010
    Windows® SharePoint® Services 3.0 Inside Out
  • 9. Implementing a SharePoint Center of Excellence(SharePoint COE)
    Organizations throughout the globe have implemented or will implement Microsoft SharePoint as a primary collaboration or content management solution within their organization. EPC Group has developed proprietary SharePoint Center of Excellence methodologies that will guarantee SharePoint is reliable, useable, scalable, and maintainable as well as a core foundation of your organization to ensure its long-term success.
  • 10. SharePoint in the Now! (From Tahoe to 2010)
  • 11. SharePoint in the Now! (SharePoint Timeline)
  • 12. SharePoint in the Now! (SharePoint Timeline)
  • 13. SharePoint in the Now! (SharePoint Timeline)
    Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (2007) (WSS)
    Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS)
  • 14. SharePoint in the Now! (SharePoint Timeline)
    Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 (2007) (WSS)
    Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 (MOSS)
  • 15. Microsoft SharePoint 2010TheBusiness Collaboration Platformfor the Enterprise and the Web
    Sites
    Connect and Empower People
    Communities
    Composites
    Cut Costs with a Unified Infrastructure
    Content
    Insights
    Rapidly Respond to Business Needs
    Search
  • 16. What is Enterprise Collaboration?
    Connecting…
    People
    People
    People
    Organizations
    Organizations
    People
    Ideas
    Information
    Customers
    Organizations
  • 17. How Do Your People Collaborate Today?
    Issues & Limitations?
    Phone
    Consumer Social Networks
    Email
    Face-to-Face
    Fax
    Messaging
    File Shares
    Paper-based
  • 18. Secure, Cost-Effective Collaboration in SP 2010
    Collaborate securely across products, technologies, and organizational boundaries.
    Enterprise
    Extranet
    Internet
    Team
    Division
    Individual
    Business Applications (SAP, data warehouse, custom, etc.)
  • 19. SharePoint 2010 | An IT Paradigm Shift
    • SharePoint Server 2010 (by itself) can replace:
    • 20. Documentum (EMC)
    • 21. LiveLink (OpenText)
    • 22. FileNet (IBM)
    • 23. WebSphere (IBM)
    • 24. eRoom
    • 25. DocuShare (Xerox)
    • 26. Existing Intranets
    • 27. Custom .NET Pages
    • 28. ColdFusion
    • 29. Java-based Intranets
  • SharePoint 2010 | An IT Paradigm Shift
    SharePoint 2010 is a Platform that EPC Group has identified that can replace at least 50 different disparate or existing content management, Intranets, and Knowledge Management systems to be your organizations ecosystem for the:
    • Intranet Solution
    • 30. Enterprise Content Management System
    • 31. Knowledge Management Solution
    • 32. Collaboration Solution
    • 33. Internet-Facing or Extranet-Facing Solution
    • 34. Business Process Automation Platform (i.e. Workflow)
    • 35. Application Development Platform
  • The SharePoint RM Feature Set
    SharePoint Server 2010 Features
    Records M. Feature Area
    In place records management
    Metadata-driven, hierarchal file plan in the archive
    Recordization
    eDiscovery
    and Hold
    eDiscovery searches over any SharePoint content
    Archive results or leave on an in place hold
    File Plan Report shows overview of content management policies
    Per item audit log reports
    Auditing
    and Reporting
    Retention
    and Expiration
    In place records management
    Metadata-driven, hierarchal file plan in the archive
  • 36.
  • 37. How do I prepare for litigation and eDiscovery?
    Business Problem #1
  • 38. Litigation and eDiscovery – How to Prepare
    Primary focus should be on up front preparation
    Appropriately enforced retention policies
    Configure the system to track appropriate actions (auditing)
    Leverage existing search technology during discovery process
    “Custodian based approach” to eDiscovery doesn’t work in a collaborative environment
  • 39. Managing E-mail Discovery
  • 40. In Place Records Management
    Record lock down, record retention polices
  • 41. Workflow and Records
    Record status driving business decisions
    Workflow creating records
    Declare Record action in SPD
  • 42. E-Mail Archiving
    Exchange 14 offers alternatives to PSTs via an online archive of e-mail
    Allows cheaper storage for the less frequently used content
    Policies can drive e-mail to the archive
  • 43. How do I scale my compliance solution to the enterprise?
    Business Problem #3
  • 44. Hub
    Scale and Distributed Architecture

    SC2
    SC1
    To scale to 100s of millions of records, we’ll need to distribute the data to several databases and sites
    O14 includes features to ensure centralized management of this distributed data
    The content organizer distributes submissions across the sites
    Content types are shared across site collections
    Centralized eDiscovery searches across all sites
    FAST Search ensures a unified retrieval experience
  • 45. Microsoft SharePoint 2010TheBusiness Collaboration Platformfor the Enterprise and the Web
    Sites
    Connect and Empower People
    Communities
    Composites
    Cut Costs with a Unified Infrastructure
    Content
    Insights
    Rapidly Respond to Business Needs
    Search
  • 46. Microsoft SharePoint 2010
    Ribbon UI
    SharePoint Workspace
    SharePoint Mobile
    Office Client and Office Web App Integration
    Standards Support
    Business Connectivity Services
    InfoPath Form Services
    External Lists
    Workflow
    SharePoint Designer
    Visual Studio
    API Enhancements
    REST/ATOM/RSS
    Tagging, Tag Cloud, Ratings
    Social Bookmarking
    Blogs and Wikis
    My Sites
    Activity Feeds
    Profiles and Expertise
    Org Browser
    Sites
    Communities
    Composites
    PerformancePoint Services
    Excel Services
    Chart Web Part
    Visio Services
    Web Analytics
    SQL Server Integration
    PowerPivot
    Content
    Insights
    Enterprise Content Types
    Metadata and Navigation
    Document Sets
    Multi-stage Disposition
    Audio and Video Content Types
    Remote Blob Storage
    List Enhancements
    Search
    Social Relevance
    Phonetic Search
    Navigation
    FAST Integration
    Enhanced Pipeline
  • 47. Microsoft SharePoint 2010: ECM (Content)
    Content
    Enterprise Content Types
    Metadata and Navigation
    Document Sets
    Multi-stage Disposition
    Audio and Video Content Types
    Remote Blob Storage
    List Enhancements
  • 48. EPC Group’s SharePoint 2010 ECMBest Practices
    Best Practices with Managed Metadata & Term Sets
  • 49. Let’s take a few steps back…
    Terminology
    What is ECM?
    Enterprise Content Management
    This is an electronic method of maintaining files within an organization
    What is Metadata?
    Data about Data
    Description of a file, for example an Invoice can be described by: Invoice #, Client, Invoice Total, Invoice Date, Expiration Date, Associated Division
    Terminology
  • 50. SharePoint 2010 for Records Management
    Search
    Users can quickly and easily locate business critical documentation via Search
    Search crawls contents of Office Files and certain PDF files
    Metadata helps to build search as well
    Can crawl other line of business system
    Versioning
    Automatically tracks versions of documentation
    One version of the truth
    Eliminates multiple copies of a document being stored on users personal computers and file shares
    Knowledge Management
    Eliminates the loss of corporate intellectual property associated with employee turn over
  • 51. SharePoint 2010 for Records Management
    Security
    Manages security of files efficiently and easily
    Legal
    Allows automated management of Records Retention Policy
    Offers eDiscovery for applying Legal Holds
    Auditing
    Opening or downloading documents
    Viewing items in lists, or viewing item properties
    Checking out or checking in items
    Moving or copying items to another location in the site
    Deleting or restoring items
    Going Green
    Saves paper and time by automating paper and time intensive processes
  • 52. Typically comes in two forms:
    Taxonomy
    Hierarchy of terms
    Folksonomy
    Mesh of terms
    More flexible – letting people choose their own tags
    Lack consistency
    Enable a wider variety of unexpected terms to be used
    Metadata
  • 53. Managing content
    Expiration
    Lifecycle
    Archiving
    Finding content
    Search
    Sorting
    Filtering
    Why Metadata
  • 54. 2010 gives us 4 types of metadata:
    Document properties
    Associated with client and really nothing to do with SharePoint
    List/library properties
    Columns being used in SharePoint
    Managed metadata
    New feature in 2010, runs as a service like search and other services that benefit from central management
    Social tags
    Really part of MMS, and organize into a tag cloud
    Metadata in SharePoint
  • 55. What are they?
    A Type of Document
    i.e. Email, Fax, Invoice, Contract, Resume, Statement of Work
    Define the following:
    Metadata
    Information Management
    Workflow
    Document Template
    Document Information Panel
    Content Types
  • 56. Multiple workflows can be attached to a Content Type
    Some common workflows include:
    Disposition
    Approval
    Publishing
    Content Types - Workflow
  • 57. Content Types – IMP
    Information Management Policies allow organizations to take control of it’s content with:
    Policy Statements
    Retention
    Auditing
    Barcodes
    Labels
  • 58. Content Types define Metadata
    This includes managed metadata!
    Content Types – Metadata & IMP
    Information Management Policies allow organizations to take control of it’s content with:
    Policy Statements
    Retention
    Auditing
    Barcodes
    Labels
  • 59. A hierarchical collection of centrally managed terms that you can define and then use as attributes for itemsin Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010.
    What is Managed Metadata?
  • 60. Managed Keywords
    Managed Terms
    Simply words or phrases
    One per content type
    Part of a single, non hierarchical term set called Keyword Set
    Always for ‘folksonomies’
    Managed Keyword Control – allows users to select from all managed keywords and terms
    Multiple values by default
    End user can enter new values
    Single or multi-value field
    Multiple columns on a list, library, or content type
    Inclusive/exclusive filtering
    MUI enabled
    Most recently used
    Tree Picker control
    Managed Keywords
  • 61. Managed Metadata Services
  • 62. Managed Metadata pulls it’s choices from a Term Set housed in the Term Store (database)
    There can be multiple term sets within a Group within a Managed Metadata Service
    There can be multiple Managed Metadata services within an organization depending on security needs
    Site Collections consume from the managed metadata services including the Content Type Hub
    Managed Metadata Continued
  • 63. A database in which managed metadata is stored in the form of term sets and terms
    Groups are the container
    Many term sets per group
    Term Store
  • 64. A collection of term sets
    Many groups per term store
    Used as security boundary
    Each term set has it’s own ACLs
    Allows for custom sort order
    And other unique settings like notification and open submission
    Term Set Group
  • 65. A collection of terms that are arranged into and stored as a hierarchy or flat list
    One instance of source term
    30,000 terms per term set
    1000 term sets per term store
    Each term can have many term labels to represent a synonym of that term
    Terms can support languages through translation.
    Term Sets
  • 66. A word or phrase that can be associated with an Object in SharePoint Server 2010
    Two types: managed terms and managed keywords
    Merge, delete, deprecate, translate, move
    Synonyms, description, translations, custom properties
    Implemented through managed metadata site column
    Terms
  • 67. This is a new column in 2010, extremely powerful
    Allows us to specify the centrally managed term set
    Used to enforce terms
    Added to new or existing content type
    Managed Metadata Column
  • 68. More consistent terminology
    Better search
    Being able to automatically update all document properties centrally
    Being able to use the term sets as search refiners/filters
    Benefits of Managed Metadata
  • 69. Regular or Managed?
  • 70. Regular or Managed?
  • 71. Information Architecture
    Consistent Terminology
    Navigation Filtering
    Archiving/Retention/Deletion
    Better Search Results
    More Metadata
    Synonyms
    Adoption
    Making it easy on the users
    Reduce training
    Workflow
    Governance & MMS
  • 72. Managed Metadata columns only work in the browser or in Office 2010 Clients
    Can’t edit in clients 2007 and later
    Can’t edit in datasheet view
    No way to bulk tag items, must be edited individually
    Poses big problems for large migrations
    Down side of Managed Metadata
  • 73. Time spent here is time well spent
    Designing and Planning an SharePoint ECM Solution
  • 74. This is a great starting point for any ECM Project
    When it’s already defined it can save a lot of time
    Use it for conversations with legal counsel about design goals
    Gives us an idea of what are considered records and need additional management
    Retention Policy
  • 75. A Tiered attribute architecture that provides flexibility to support processes, functions, and local needs
    Related to the Metadata Model, a new ECM Solution will:
    Deliver the Global/Core Attributes to support the system
    Recommend opportunities to standardize labels and definitions for Extended Attributes, but the business decides what they will mandate
    Implement the architecture to support Extended and Local Attributes
    The business is responsible for developing the master data sources
    EPC Group’s ECM Model
  • 76. ECM Metadata Model
    Examples
    Author, Date Created, Modified By, etc.
    Contract Expiration Date, Bank Location, etc.
    Software Type, Job Description, Part Number, Invoice Date
    Varies by local need and needs to be defined by the local business units, country, region
  • 77. Is required for all documents coming into an organization
    Apply the Global Metadata to the Parent Content Type that all future content types will inherit from
    Sometimes multiple Parent content types are required based on needs for retention
    Parent Content Types are never used in a document library for loading content to
    A base Organization Document can be built directly off the parent as a good default Document for all libraries – example FRBNY Document
    The Global– Start here
  • 78. Is the next layer
    Think of these as the files types or document types that every user within an organization may use
    Common Examples:
    Email
    Presentation
    Fax
    Photo
    Policy
    Project File
    The Core
  • 79. Take time to define the Core set of Content Types and associated metadata
    These content types and metadata are typically rolled out with every Site Collection, not necessarily loaded in every library by default though
    The Core
    Extended
    Are often thought of as Division or Departmental Content Types and Metadata
    These are only made available within the Division/Department for which they are designed
  • 80. Serve to capture any outliers associated with special teams or locations
    Organizations functioning globally will often need to go to this last level in order to comply with local laws
    The Local Group
    Keep in Mind…
    How many attributes will your user have to enter?
    The fewer required fields, the more likely you are to achieve user adoption and compliance
    Global should be mostly auto populating or defaulting fields where users rarely need to edit the defaults
  • 81. Managing Digital Assets
    Enterprise organizations increasingly use digital technology and digital media content, such as audio and video files, to communicate better within the enterprise and with customers. Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 provides optimum support for audio and video files that are smaller than 150 MB in size, includes improved support of metadata extraction from image files, and can support audio and video files designed for informal demonstrations and presentations up to 2 GB in size.
  • 82. Managing Digital Assets
    For video, SharePoint Server 2010 supports adding video to different types of SharePoint Server 2010 pages and playing video through :
    A media player, built on Microsoft Silverlight 2.0, that supports themes powered by Extensible Application Markup Language (XAML)
    A "Video" content type for use in asset libraries
    A "Media Web Part" that you can use to include video in pages and Web Part Pages
    Support for selecting videos in the asset picker
  • 83. Managing Documents in SharePoint 2010
    SharePoint Server 2010’s new and revised features:
    Document Sets
    Content Organizer
    Location-based Metadata Defaults
    Metadata Navigation and Filtering
    Document IDs
  • 84. Document Sets
    A document set manages work products that are made up of multiple documents. They are special types of folders used to manage work products and provide a user interface (UI), metadata options, behaviors, and object model elements to help manage all aspects of a work product.
    They are used throughout SharePoint Server 2010 features and services and Document Sets are designed to help users organize content in a more meaningful and useful way.
  • 85. Content Organizer
    The Content Organizer is a way of managing document submissions to a site and routing them to the correct library and folder based on predefined routing rules.
    The feature builds upon the records routing framework that was first introduced in MOSS and extends it beyond the Records Center and records management scenarios to more general document management scenarios and applications.
  • 86. Content Organizer
    In a SharePoint Server 2010 document library, a content steward, records managers, etc. manages the containers and rules that govern which documents belong in each container.
    The content steward or records mangers uses the Content Organizer to manage the containers and the rules that govern them.
  • 87. Location-based Metadata Defaults
    All ECM features in SP Server 2010 emphasize the importance of metadata and managing large lists, and location-based metadata defaults make it easier for you to manage and apply metadata in document management scenarios.
    Goals of location-based metadata defaults include:
    Enabling content stewards to provide default "helper" metadata values for items, based on their location within a document library, for both documents and document sets.
    Ensuring that content stewards can understand how the default metadata values they have established at various locations in a folder hierarchy affects items.
    Ensuring that when contributors or content stewards add items to a location, default values pre-populate the appropriate fields and contributors and content stewards are not required to know where the default value came from or how it got there.
  • 88. Metadata Navigation and Filtering
    This is an effective tool for navigating large lists of documents. The feature was designed to be the way to navigate the contents of large repositories in SharePoint Server 2010, which it accomplishes by:
    Enabling multiple pivots on data. After the content steward or librarian classifies documents by tagging them, users can find and retrieve those documents based on their metadata values.
    Ensuring that visitors, contributors, and content stewards are never blocked from seeing useful results after using metadata navigation and filtering to run a query.
    Enabling content stewards to configure metadata navigation and filtering to perform well for the majority of libraries without having to explicitly create indices to support queries used to retrieve documents.
    Assisting content stewards to specify additional indices that they can use to enhance performance over a wider range of queries.
    Assisting users in refining queries to use compound indices to increase the relevance of results
  • 89. Document IDs in SharePoint Server 2010
    A document ID is a unique identifier for a document or document set and a static URL that opens the document or document set associated with the document ID, regardless of the location of the document. Document IDs provide:
    A way to reference items such as documents and document sets in SharePoint Server 2010 that is less fragile than using URLs.
    URLs break if the location of the item changes. In place of the URL, the document ID feature creates a static URL for each content item with a document ID assigned to it.
    More flexible support for moving documents or document sets at different points in the document life cycle.
  • 90. Managed Metadata: Using Terms
    A column is a location in a list in which to store information about a SharePoint Server item.
    When you define a column, you provide a name for the column, specify the column type, and provide additional information depending on the column type.
    SharePoint Server 2010 introduces a new column type called managed metadata. When you create a managed metadata column, the column's value comes from a term set that you specify. When you want users to provide information for list items (including documents), and the valid values for the information are contained in a term set, use a managed metadata column. Create a new content type or modify an existing content type, and add the managed metadata column to the content type.
  • 91. Managed Metadata: Using Terms
    A column is a location in a list in which to store information about a SharePoint Server item.
    When you define a column, you provide a name for the column, specify the column type, and provide additional information depending on the column type.
    SharePoint Server 2010 introduces a new column type called managed metadata. When you create a managed metadata column, the column's value comes from a term set that you specify. When you want users to provide information for list items (including documents), and the valid values for the information are contained in a term set, use a managed metadata column. Create a new content type or modify an existing content type, and add the managed metadata column to the content type.
  • 92. Managed Metadata: Entering Terms
    When a user creates or uploads a new SharePoint Server item of a type that has columns that require a value, the user must provide a value. If the column is a managed metadata column, the managed metadata control is displayed, and the user interacts with this control to enter the value.
    The managed metadata control enables the user either to type a value or to select a value by hierarchically navigating the term set that is associated with the column. If the user begins typing a value, the control displays all terms in the associated term set that begin with the characters the user has typed. The name of the term set and the term's position in the hierarchy are indicated along with the term itself.
    If the column's definition allows multiple values, the user can select more than one term. If both the term set and the column's definition allow new terms to be added, the user can also create a new term and insert it at the appropriate place in the term set's hierarchy.
  • 93. Managing Records and eDiscovery
    Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 provides features designed to manage records. A record is any document that is important to a business or organization and that is managed by a business process. In SharePoint Server 2010, records management and eDiscovery functionality is enhanced with new features and capabilities, including:
    Multistage policy improvements
    Widely accessible eDiscovery
    Records Center template
    Component features of the Records Center that can be enabled on any site
    Location-based expiration schedules
  • 94. Compliance Fundamentals
    Compliance in SharePoint Server 2010 is about enforcing rules that reduce business risk. Risk can come in many forms: legal, information disclosure, cost overruns, government regulation, and more.
    Typically, management hires records managers, compliance officers, and lawyers to establish and enact the oversight of risk. For the purposes of identifying the user roles supported by SharePoint Server 2010, the term records manager describes an individual who manages risk.
    Within content management, compliance includes four main scenarios. The features that are available by default in SharePoint Server 2010 are designed to support the following scenarios.
  • 95. Compliance Fundamentals
    Compliance in SharePoint Server 2010 is about enforcing rules that reduce business risk. Risk can come in many forms: legal, information disclosure, cost overruns, government regulation, and more.
    Typically, management hires records managers, compliance officers, and lawyers to establish and enact the oversight of risk. For the purposes of identifying the user roles supported by SharePoint Server 2010, the term records manager describes an individual who manages risk.
    Within content management, compliance includes four main scenarios.
  • 96. Microsoft Business Productivity InfrastructureOffice Brings Even More Value to Server & Services Capabilities
    Deliver the value of servers & services to users
    Surface LOB information in familiar applications
    Single-interface training helps manage support costs
  • 97. More Than Likely It’s a Hybrid
    Probable Answer:
    • A Hybrid of all of the above
    More than likely it’s a Hybrid of all of the above…
    Your organization may want to:
    Deploy an Intranet solution for Phase 1
    Continue building out the SharePoint solution by adding an Enterprise Content Management Solution for Phase 2
    Add External Access and Custom Workflows for Phase 3
    Use SharePoint as the Application Development Platform for the entire organization for Phase 4
  • 98. EPC Group’s Key Pillars of our SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE)
    EPC Group’s SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE) methodologies consist of several key pillars:
    • The development a SharePoint Roadmap (3, 6, 12, 18, 24 ,36 months)
    • 99. Development of a SharePoint Governance Strategy
    • 100. Not only the development but the enforcement of “Operational” SharePoint Governance
    • 101. “Not only how the ship works but how to drive the ship, run the ship, and how to maintain the ship”
    • 102. Implementing SharePoint as a Platform so that it can evolve into a “Hybrid”
    solution if needed
    • Architect a solution that will not just support Phase 1 or Phase 2’s objectives but will support the ever evolving business and functional requirements of the organization
    • 103. Implementing the Gallery Approach
    • 104. A Workflow Gallery, a Web Part Gallery, a Master Page Gallery, etc…
    • 105. Reuse what works within the organization across multiple divisions, departments, etc.
  • EPC Group’s Key Pillars of our SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE)
    EPC Group’s SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE) methodologies consist of several key pillars:
    • Implement a Core Content Type (metadata) Strategy from the beginning
    • 106. If this is not done in the initial phases of your SharePoint initiative, it will become more and more difficult to implement this strategy as additional content is saved within SharePoint on a daily basis
    • 107. Implementation of a:
    • 108. Charge Back Model for SharePoint so that departments can assist IT in covering the cost of providing this powerful service
    • 109. Communication and Training Strategy for SharePoint
    • 110. Power User Strategy for your organization
    • 111. Site Provisioning Strategy for your organization
    • 112. Mobile and Scanning SharePoint Strategies for your organization
  • EPC Group’s Key Pillars of our SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE)
    EPC Group’s SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE) methodologies consist of several key pillars:
    • Implement a Core Content Type (metadata) Strategy from the beginning
    • 113. If this is not done in the initial phases of your SharePoint initiative, it will become more and more difficult to implement this strategy as additional content is saved within SharePoint on a daily basis
    • 114. Implementation of a:
    • 115. Charge Back Model for SharePoint so that departments can assist IT in covering the cost of providing this powerful service
    • 116. Communication and Training Strategy for SharePoint
    • 117. Power User Strategy for your organization
    • 118. Site Provisioning Strategy for your organization
    • 119. Mobile and Scanning SharePoint Strategies for your organization
  • EPC Group’s Key Pillars of our SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE)
    EPC Group’s SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE) methodologies consist of several key pillars:
    • Implement a Core Content Type (metadata) Strategy from the beginning
    • 120. If this is not done in the initial phases of your SharePoint initiative, it will become more and more difficult to implement this strategy as additional content is saved within SharePoint on a daily basis
    • 121. Implementation of a:
    • 122. Charge Back Model for SharePoint so that departments can assist IT in covering the cost of providing this powerful service
    • 123. Communication and Training Strategy for SharePoint
    • 124. Power User Strategy for your organization
    • 125. Site Provisioning Strategy for your organization
    • 126. Mobile and Scanning SharePoint Strategies for your organization
  • EPC Group’s Key Pillars of our SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE)
    EPC Group’s SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE) methodologies consist of several key pillars:
    • Implement a Core Content Type (metadata) Strategy from the beginning
    • 127. If this is not done in the initial phases of your SharePoint initiative, it will become more and more difficult to implement this strategy as additional content is saved within SharePoint on a daily basis
    • 128. Implementation of a:
    • 129. Charge Back Model for SharePoint so that departments can assist IT in covering the cost of providing this powerful service
    • 130. Communication and Training Strategy for SharePoint
    • 131. Power User Strategy for your organization
    • 132. Site Provisioning Strategy for your organization
    • 133. Mobile and Scanning SharePoint Strategies for your organization
  • EPC Group’s Key Pillars of our SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE)
    EPC Group’s SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE) methodologies consist of several key pillars:
    • Implement a Core Content Type (metadata) Strategy from the beginning
    • 134. If this is not done in the initial phases of your SharePoint initiative, it will become more and more difficult to implement this strategy as additional content is saved within SharePoint on a daily basis
    • 135. Implementation of a:
    • 136. Charge Back Model for SharePoint so that departments can assist IT in covering the cost of providing this powerful service
    • 137. Communication and Training Strategy for SharePoint
    • 138. Power User Strategy for your organization
    • 139. Site Provisioning Strategy for your organization
    • 140. Mobile and Scanning SharePoint Strategies for your organization
  • EPC Group’s Key Pillars of our SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE)
    EPC Group’s SharePoint Center of Excellence (COE) methodologies consist of several key pillars:
    • Implement a Core Content Type (metadata) Strategy from the beginning
    • 141. If this is not done in the initial phases of your SharePoint initiative, it will become more and more difficult to implement this strategy as additional content is saved within SharePoint on a daily basis
    • 142. Implementation of a:
    • 143. Charge Back Model for SharePoint so that departments can assist IT in covering the cost of providing this powerful service
    • 144. Communication and Training Strategy for SharePoint
    • 145. Power User Strategy for your organization
    • 146. Site Provisioning Strategy for your organization
    • 147. Mobile and Scanning SharePoint Strategies for your organization
  • SharePoint as a Service (SPaaS)
    You’ve heard of software as a service (SaaS); now it’s time to think about SharePoint as a service (SPaaS).
    Possible “SPaaS” in your organization:
    • Intranet Service
    • 148. Enterprise Content Management Service
    • 149. Knowledge Management Service
    • 150. Extranet Services (i.e. Customer or Partner Portal)
    • 151. Workflow Service
    • 152. Application Development Service (i.e. Utilizing SharePoint as the “one-stop-shop” to house all your organization’s applications)
    Your SharePoint platform should be built as a service to meet the business
    and functional requirements of your organization.
  • 153. SharePoint Should Be Implemented as a Platform
    Regardless if your organization is trying to accomplish ONE or even ALL of the following with your SharePoint implementation:
    For example:
    • Intranet Service (Platform)
    • 154. Enterprise Content Management Service (Platform)
    • 155. Knowledge Management Service (Platform)
    • 156. Extranet Service (Platform)
    • 157. Workflow Service (Platform)
    • 158. Application Development Service (Platform)
    SharePoint must be implemented as a
    Platform so that it can accomplish any of
    the goals listed above without ever
    having be rearchitected.
    Sites
    Communities
    Composites
    Content
    Insights
    Search
  • 159. Designing The SharePoint Platform with Future Phases in Mind
    While following the phased SharePoint approach, make sure to develop a SharePoint roadmap and have the “Big Picture” in mind for what SharePoint will ideally become within your organization.
    • Architect placeholders or “Buckets of Functionality” for future phases phases
  • Designing The SharePoint Platform with Future Phases in Mind
    The goal of Phase 1 may be to rollout a company wide SharePoint intranet
    If Phase 1 is designed without taking into consideration a possible Phase 2 ECM or Knowledge Management initiative that the organization has planned, SharePoint may have to be rearchitected at significant cost to the organization in Phase 2.
  • 160. Designing The SharePoint Platform with Future Phases in Mind
    Content Type (Metadata) design should be addressed as soon as possible.
    If thousands of documents are uploaded into SharePoint in Phase 1 and Content Types (Metadata) were not present, chances are that no user will ever go back after the fact to properly classify this content.
  • 161. Designing The SharePoint Platform with Future Phases in Mind
    You must take into consideration during Phase 1 of any SharePoint initiative:
    Site Hierarchy and Navigational Requirement (For Current and Future Phases)
    Content Types (Metadata) that will be captured in future phases
    Site Collections Requirements
    Content Databases (Sizing Requirements)
    Buckets of Functionality (Placeholders for Future Phases)
  • 162. Real World Examples: Ensuring SharePoint’s Success
    What makes for a successful SharePoint initiative?
    • Proper upfront planning (The System & Information Architecture)
    • 163. Looking at the big picture and developing a SharePoint Roadmap for your organization (A Roadmap for 6 months, 12 months, 18 months)
    • 164. Executive Sponsorship Executive Buy-in
    • 165. Enterprise SharePoint Governance: planning and enforcement
    • 166. Development of a rock solid environment with a corresponding disaster recovery plan so you do not ever lose your users confidence or their content
    • 167. Developing Metadata Content Type standards in the initial stages of your initiatives
    • 168. Finding and achieving quick wins to “wow” your users
  • EPC Group’s Best Practices SharePoint Governance
    SharePoint Governance for your environment is absolutely critical
    If you don’t enforce Governance in the initial phases of your initiative, its going to be twice as hard to implement down the road BUT it needs to be done regardless of your current state
    At a high level, SharePoint Governance consists of two major areas:
    Infrastructure Governance
    Information Management Governance
  • 169. EPC Group’s Best Practices SharePoint Governance
    From these two major areas, I prefer to break it down further and create 4 major topic areas so that I can start gathering requirements to properly architect and design tailored organizationally specific SharePoint Governance Policies:
    Environment and Security Governance
    Custom Development Governance
    Content Related Governance
    Administrative and Training Governance
  • 170. EPC Group’s Best Practices SharePoint Governance (cont..)
    The major topic areas contain a large number of granular subtopics:
    • Environment and Security Governance
    • 171. SharePoint Disaster Recovery Governance
    • 172. Defining SharePoint SLAs
    • 173. Defining SharePoint Maintenance
    • 174. SharePoint Security Governance
    • 175. Site Provisioning Governance
    • 176. Continued…
     
    • Custom Development Governance
    Development of Organizational SharePoint Development Standards
    Development of Deployment and Code Promotion Requirements
    SharePoint Branding Governance
    Third-party Solution or Custom Solution Purchasing Policies
    SharePoint Designer 2007 Policies and Procedures
    Continued…
  • 177. EPC Group’s Best Practices SharePoint Governance (cont..)
    The major topic areas contain a large number of granular subtopics:
    • Content Related Governance
    Enterprise Content Management Related Policies
    Site Storage Policies (i.e. Quotas, File Upload limits, etc)
    My Site Policies
    Power User and Content Updating Guidelines
    Executive and Legal Content Policies
    Document Libraries and List Customization Policies
    • Administrative and Training Governance
    • 178. SharePoint Training Guidelines
    • 179. SharePoint Communication Plan Guidelines
    • 180. SharePoint Committee Policies
    • 181. Enterprise SharePoint Support Model
    • 182. Executive Dashboard SharePoint Reporting Guidelines
    • 183. Continued…
  • MySite Governance is Critical!
    My Site templates and custom site definitions can be created to minimize these risks, but organizations should adhere to the following standards during their My Site rollout:
    • All My Site Public View content must contain only work-related material. This includes work-related documents, discussions, pictures, links, calendar events, and related content.
    • 184. No My Site Public View content can contain any confidential or private data. If the organization would not allow all users within the company with a domain login to view this information, consider whether it should be on your My Site Public View.
    • 185. Content pertaining to human resources or legal is typically considered confidential and should not be listed on My Site Public View.
    • 186. Financial data must be reviewed prior to its posting on My Site Public View.
    • 187. Content on the private site must not contain personal audio files, inappropriate pictures, or other materials not allowed within the organization.
    • 188. All discussions or blogging done within a My Site must follow company policies and must not contain sensitivecompany material or defamatory comments about any person within the organization.
  • Building a SharePoint Charge Back Model
    At what level do I enable self service?
    Where do I want IT to Step In.
    What quota should I allow?
    How will data or sites be expired?
    How will I provide search or browse?
    What customizations/dev will I allow?
    How will I manage and support the adhocunstructured collaboration?
    IT Provisioned
    Larger Quota
    Permanent
    Supported Dev env.
    $$$ Charge Back
    Self Service
    Smaller Quota
    Quicker Expiration
    OOB
    Adhoc
    Structured
  • 189. Examples of a SharePoint
    Charge Back Model
  • 190. Examples of a SharePoint
    Charge Back Model
  • 191. Your Organization’s SharePoint Service Level Agreement
    When developing Service Level Agreements for SharePoint there are key questions to pose to both IT and the business:
    • Do we have mission business critical data stored in SharePoint?
    • 192. What is the acceptable downtime for SharePoint within my organization?
    • 193. How would lengthy downtown affect the overall user base’s acceptance of SharePoint or any current or future SharePoint initiatives?
    • 194. What is the cost of investing in third-party tools to quickly restore the data vs. the cost to the organization of just having users recreate it?
    If a site gets deleted at 3:00pm in the afternoon and IT has to restore it
    from yesterday’s backup (at 1am)… Users who performed any work that day
    are going to loose their data and you are going to have a hard time gaining
    their trust enough again to have them store anything of value in SharePoint
    Over the past few months, I have asked the question on acceptable downtime
    for SharePoint to several of EPC Group’s clients and the average answer was
    approximately 4 hours
  • 195. Enabling Power Users (EPC Group’s Strategy)
    How to spread the load by delegating to ‘Power Users’ in your organization
  • 196. The Power User Analogy
    “The Mall Manager”
    “The Store Owner”
    A SharePoint Administrator
    A SharePoint Power User
  • 197. SharePoint Roles (Example)
  • 198. SharePoint Roles (Example)