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PEM Twitter talk
 

PEM Twitter talk

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Peabody Essex Museum's Social Media Committee presents a series of "Social Media 101" talks on pertinent platforms for the staff. This presentation is on Twitter for museum professionals

Peabody Essex Museum's Social Media Committee presents a series of "Social Media 101" talks on pertinent platforms for the staff. This presentation is on Twitter for museum professionals

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    PEM Twitter talk PEM Twitter talk Presentation Transcript

    • Getting Started with: “new twitter” by Flickr user MDGovpics CC BY 2.0
    • Twitter for museum types
    • Twitter for museum types Twitter is the #1 social media tool I use. It’s kinda awesome...
    • Twitter for museum types Twitter is the #1 social media tool I use. It’s kinda awesome...
    • Twitter for museum types Twitter is the #1 social media tool I use. It’s kinda awesome... It can be a valuable tool for your museum work and professional development.
    • Twitter for museum types
    • Twitter for museum types You can use it to:
    • Twitter for museum types You can use it to: • find interesting stuff,
    • Twitter for museum types You can use it to: • find interesting stuff, • disseminate your work,
    • Twitter for museum types You can use it to: • find interesting stuff, • disseminate your work, • discuss projects,
    • Twitter for museum types You can use it to: • • • • find interesting stuff, disseminate your work, discuss projects, find collaborators and colleagues, and
    • Twitter for museum types You can use it to: • • • • • find interesting stuff, disseminate your work, discuss projects, find collaborators and colleagues, and build your own personal professional network.
    • Twitter for museum types
    • Twitter for museum types In the next few minutes we’ll explain a bit about what Twitter is for, how it works, and how you can use it.
    • Twitter for museum types In the next few minutes we’ll explain a bit about what Twitter is for, how it works, and how you can use it. Ready?
    • Twitter for museum types
    • In short, Twitter acts like a serendipity engine making it more likely that you can bump into interesting people and content online, with minimal effort on your part.
    • But first, a little history… Twitter began with a simple premise. Jack Dorsey simply wanted to know what his friends were up to. So he and his partners started a company... “new twitter” by Flickr user MDGovpics CC BY 2.0
    • The SMS text message protocol allows for 160 characters, so Twitter picked 140 characters as a limit to leave room for addressing, and voila!
    • The SMS text message protocol allows for 160 characters, so Twitter picked 140 characters as a limit to leave room for addressing, and voila!
    • The SMS text message protocol allows for 160 characters, so Twitter picked 140 characters as a limit to leave room for addressing, and voila! World’s first tweet. Pretty deep, huh?
    • Twitter misperceptions
    • Twitter misperceptions Isn’t it just people describing what they had for lunch?
    • Twitter misperceptions Isn’t it just people describing what they had for lunch? Only if you’re @neilhimself or @StephenFry. Twitter celebrities tend to use Twitter as a broadcast medium. For the rest of us, it’s more conversational.
    • Twitter misperceptions
    • Twitter misperceptions Can you really say anything of value in 140 characters?
    • Twitter misperceptions Can you really say anything of value in 140 characters? Yes.
    • Twitter misperceptions
    • Twitter misperceptions I don’t know anyone else on there, so how can I be “part of the conversation?”
    • Twitter misperceptions I don’t know anyone else on there, so how can I be “part of the conversation?” Follow people. Chances are, people you know, or know of, are already on Twitter. We’ll show you how.
    • Twitter lingo cuz you gotta talk the talk if you’re gonna walk the walk...
    • Twitter lingo Handle:
    • Twitter lingo Handle: Your Twitter username, whatever comes after the “@“ sign. Mine is @erodley. It’s like an email address. It’s how your tweets are identified and how others identify you.
    • Twitter lingo Timeline:
    • Twitter lingo Timeline: Your timeline is what you see when you log into Twitter – by default you’ll be on the Home screen, which consists of your own tweets, tweets from people you follow, and Retweets.
    • Twitter lingo Follow / Followers:
    • Twitter lingo Follow / Followers: This is the basis of the Twitter network. If you Follow someone you see what they tweet and retweet in your timeline; if they follow you, they see your Tweets.
    • Following tips
    • Following tips • Follow plenty of relevant people so you have a steady stream of content.
    • Following tips • Follow plenty of relevant people so you have a steady stream of content. • This does not mean you should Follow everybody you encounter. Following too many people makes Twitter less useful.
    • Following tips • Follow plenty of relevant people so you have a steady stream of content. • This does not mean you should Follow everybody you encounter. Following too many people makes Twitter less useful. • Unfollow people or organizations over time if you stop reading their tweets.
    • Twitter lingo Hashtag (#):
    • Twitter lingo Hashtag (#): A pound sign, or hashtag is a way to categorize tweets on a similar topic or belonging to a particular group of Twitter users. The hashtag is used to identify keywords or topics in a tweet. It’s also a meme with the kids nowadays.
    • “I was sooooo not there on time! #Fail”
    • Twitter lingo RT:
    • Twitter lingo RT: Retweet. Passing on someone’s tweet to everybody who follows you as a way of amplifying the reach of a tweet. Celebrities serve an important role as retweeters. Get Neil Gaiman to RT something of yours and your follower count will go through the roof.
    • Twitter lingo MT :
    • Twitter lingo MT : Modified retweet. We work in museums, where people who have delicate sensibilities abound. Sometimes a tweet is too long to RT without editing it. Some prefer to indicate that they have done textual violence to the original in order to pass it along.
    • Twitter lingo Tweep(s):
    • Twitter lingo Tweep(s): People you know on Twitter
    • Twitter lingo Thread:
    • Twitter lingo Thread: A conversational string of tweets, usually replies to an original tweet.
    • Twitter lingo Tweetstream:
    • Twitter lingo Tweetstream: The often mesmerizing stream of tweets that will cascade down your window once you start to follow people. It can be distracting, too. Don’t be afraid to turn it off and get to work.
    • Twitter lingo DM (or Direct Message):
    • Twitter lingo DM (or Direct Message): A Direct Message is a private message sent between users, like a mini-email. It does not appear on the public network. It’s important to note that only people you follow can DM you (and you can only DM people who follow you).
    • DM tip
    • DM tip Tweets like ‘New position in my department – DM me for details’ are bad idea, because not everyone reading the Tweet will actually be able to message you.
    • Twitter lingo Favorite:
    • Twitter lingo Favorite: A tweet you’ve starred.You can use it as a filing system, via your Favorites screen so you can keep track of useful tweets or links. Trawling other people’s Favorites is a great way to unearth interesting content.
    • Twitter lingo Reply / @ / Mentions:
    • Twitter lingo Reply / @ / Mentions: You can tweet directly at somebody to converse. If you use the Reply function, your tweet gets tacked onto the thread. If you mention a user (include their handle) in your tweet, they’ll see it.
    • Twitter for museum types
    • Twitter for museum types OK, so enough lingo. Let’s look around Twitter and set you up.
    • Twitter interface
    • home screen
    • your timeline
    • @Connect
    • # Discover
    • Me
    • Favorites
    • Favorites
    • Favorites
    • Favorites
    • What does it look like when you:
    • What does it look like when you: • • • • • find interesting stuff, disseminate your work, discuss projects, find collaborators and colleagues, and build your own personal professional network.
    • Finding stuff
    • Disseminating work
    • Disseminating work
    • Disseminating work
    • Discuss stuff
    • Discuss stuff
    • Discuss stuff
    • Find people stuff
    • Find people stuff
    • Build your network
    • Build your network
    • Build your network
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 1. Go to http://www.twitter.com and register for an account.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 2. Compose a short bio.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 2. Compose a short bio. This is really important – This is what will give people enough info to follow you. Try to mention topics you like as well as where you’re from.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 3. Upload a picture of yourself.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 3. Upload a picture of yourself. Just do it. We are none of us movie stars, but profiles without pictures scream “I don’t really care.” Make it a pretty picture if you don’t want your mug splashed up on screen. Just don’t leave it blank.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 4. Start following people and organizations.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 4. Start following people and organizations. Strangely enough, we’d recommend starting with @peabodyessex
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 5. Send your first a tweet, using the Compose new tweet box in the top left hand corner.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 5. Send your first a tweet, using the Compose new tweet box in the top left hand corner. Remember tweets need to be 140 characters or less. Watch the counter in the corner. Write a few initial tweets to seed your timeline. It’s fine to start with “I’m new to Twitter!” or “I’m gonna tweet about contemporary art issues and philanthropy”.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 6. Search for a hashtag
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 6. Search for a hashtag Try #AAM2013 or #curating.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 7. Search for something that interests you.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 8. Retweet an interesting tweet.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 8. Retweet an interesting tweet. You can RT by hovering over a tweet and clicking the Retweet button which then appears.You can also Favorite things to refer back to later.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 9. Follow some people 10. Voila! You’re a Twitter user.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 9. Follow some people Press the blue Follow button on their profiles. Their tweets will now appear in the timeline on your homescreen. 10. Voila! You’re a Twitter user.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 10.Voila! You’re a Twitter user. 10. Voila! You’re a Twitter user.
    • Twitter in 10 Easy Steps 10.Voila! You’re a Twitter user. Welcome aboard, tweeps! 10. Voila! You’re a Twitter user.
    • If you have questions or concerns, email me at ed_rodley@pem.org, or DM @erodley. And stay tuned for details on our next workshop! Questions?