Economies in Transition: Leveraing Cultural Assets for Prosperityes In Transition
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

Economies in Transition: Leveraing Cultural Assets for Prosperityes In Transition

on

  • 1,778 views

Presentation delivered by Peter Kenyon, Director of Bank of I.D.E.A.S in Perth, Australia. The presentation explores asset-based community development projects in rural and remote Australia and New ...

Presentation delivered by Peter Kenyon, Director of Bank of I.D.E.A.S in Perth, Australia. The presentation explores asset-based community development projects in rural and remote Australia and New Zealand. The presentation was delivered to The Ontario Rural Council's municipal cultural planning forum

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,778
Views on SlideShare
1,671
Embed Views
107

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
35
Comments
0

1 Embed 107

http://www.slideshare.net 107

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Economies in Transition: Leveraing Cultural Assets for Prosperityes In Transition Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Economies in Transition – leveraging cultural assets for prosperity ~ Presentation Slides ~ Peter Kenyon Director Bank of IDEAS (Initiatives for the Development of Enterprising Action and Strategies)
  • 2. Australian/New Zealand experiences
  • 3.  
  • 4. ‘ In times of change it is the learners who inherit the future. Those who have finished learning find themselves equipped to live in a world that no longer exists . ' (Eric Hoffer)
  • 5.  
  • 6. ‘ You've got to be hungry – for ideas, to make things happen and to see your vision made into reality .’ (Anita Roddick)
  • 7. Here is Edward Bear coming downstairs now Bump Bump On the back of his head, Behind Christopher Robin. It is, as far as he knows,The only way of Coming downstairs, But sometimes he feels,That there is another way, If only he could stop Bumping For a moment and Think of it. (Winnie-the-Pooh)
  • 8.
    • ‘ Continuing to do the same thing and expecting a different result’  
    • (Einstein’s Definition of Insanity)
  • 9. ‘ The trouble with our times is that the future ain’t what it used to be.’ (Peter Drucker)
  • 10. ‘ People, Planet, Prosperity and Preservation’ Economic viability Environmental integrity Community well being Cultural enhancement Achieving Sustainable Balance
  • 11. ‘ Tourism is now the world’s largest industry by virtually any economic measure, including gross output, value adding, employment, capital investment and tax contributions.’ (World Tourism Organisation)
  • 12. You only need 20 car loads of visitors overnight, each night, for one year to have the same economic impact as a factory with an annual payroll of $1.5million. The same 20 car loads of visitors arriving each night creates 21 jobs in the local economy each year. (WA Tourism Commission)
  • 13. 100 Tourists per Day 100 New Manufacturing Jobs   ▪ Population increase of 459 ▪ Population increase of 360   ▪ 140 new households ▪ 100 new households   ▪ $777,777 increase in personal income ▪ $410,000 increase in personal income   ▪ $144,000 increase in bank deposits ▪ $229,999 increase in bank deposits   ▪ $1,120,000 in retails sales ▪ $331,000 in retail sales   ▪ 7 more retail outlets ▪ 3 more retail outlets   ▪ 111 new industry related jobs ▪ 65 new industry related jobs (Source: US Chamber of Commerce) Comparison of the Annual Economic Impact of 100 Visitors a day vs 100 New Manufacturing Jobs
  • 14. LIFE in the PAST LANE
  • 15.
    • 70% of first time visitors are interested in heritage
    • Heritage focussed visitors stay longer
    • Heritage focussed visitors spend more per day (up to 2.5 times more than other visitors)
    Heritage Tourism Virginia, USA study
  • 16.  
  • 17. Kaikoura, (New Zealand) Kaikoura : Population 4000 Traditional farming and fishing 1987 - 3600 international visitors 2002 - 350 000 international visitors 2004 - 650, 000 international visitors Tourism sector contributes $67 million to the local economy. 1/3 of the town’s full time jobs are in tourism, and another 1/3 rely on a proportion of the tourism income to make their job sustainable.
  • 18. Comparison - Kaikoura 1987 – 2007 1987 2007 Variance % Accommodation Complex 23 96 + 317% Guest Beds 386 1860 + 382% Coach Services 2 each week 112 weekly + 5,500% Licensed Premises 4 43 + 975% Restaurants / Cafés 10 35 + 250% Tour Operators 5 58 + 1060% Taxi Services 0 1 New Service Building Permits Issued 41 221 + 439%
  • 19.  
  • 20. Kaikoura Whale Watch
    • Established in late 1980’s by local
    • Maori desperate to create
    • employment and build a future for
    • their children.
    • Local Maori (over 90% unemployment
    • rate) borrowed $35 000 to initiate –
    • used their homes as collateral.
    • Only grant in their history - $5000
    • for a feasibility plan.
  • 21.  
  • 22. Kaikoura Whale Watch
    • Today:
    • Biggest employer in Kaikoura with over 250
    • staff.
    • 2004 – 200,000 Whale Watch customers
    • Winner of the Best Global Eco Tourism Business
    • Award.
    • Besides Whale Watch, the company has a wide
    • range of businesses:
      • biggest Day Tour company operating from
    • Christchurch
      • chain of 9 coffee shops throughout New Zealand
      • - Clifford Bay Marine Farm
      • - technology investments.
  • 23.  
  • 24.  
  • 25. PERSPECTIVE 3
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28.
    • best of the past and present
    • mindset – optimism, funkiness
    • all facets of life
    • lifestyle
    • stories
    • decadence
    Art Deco More than an interesting architectural design …
  • 29.  
  • 30.  
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33.  
  • 34.  
  • 35.  
  • 36. Economic Contribution Dr Warren Hughes, Economic Dept of Waikato University utilising economic modelling techniques assessed for the 2004 / 05 period the total revenue impact of three cluster areas of the Art Deco Trust …
  • 37.
    • Administration / shop / wholesaling / publishing
    • Key events (Art Deco weekend & Deco Decanted)
    • Art Deco walks / tours
  • 38.
    • Gross output (total revenue) impact on the local economy of $23 million (direct input of $11 million and indirect input of &12 million)
    • Real value added / GNP boost to local economic activities of $10 million after expenditures to outside regions
    • Overall annual fulltime equivalent employment impact of 189
    • Total additional net household income of $5 million
  • 39.
    • Trust Organisation and Trading Events 9%
    • Key Events 48%
    • Walks and Tours 43%
    Break Up
  • 40.
    • External profile, image & tourism brand
    • Napier’s overall tourism sector – up to $100 million in tourism spending
    • Civic pride
    • Social capital – community volunteering
    Other Important Contributions …
  • 41.
    • Quality of city design
    • Strengthening of Napier commercial role in the region, and especially its CBD area
    • New business development including specialized Art Deco businesses
    • Skill development especially in terms of tourism and hospitality
    • Maintaining and strengthening the historic preservation process
  • 42.  
  • 43.  
  • 44. THE STORY OF SMALL TOWN HARROW
  • 45.  
  • 46.  
  • 47. 'Harrow was down to being a two keg a week place, and struggling … it needed an outside income … we looked within and identified our assets - location to other tourism product, its history as the oldest inland town in Victoria, and a cemetery full of great stories. With these assets we have scripted a story based on the towns heritage and folklore, and the rest is definitely history ...’ (Angela Newton, Publican, Heritage Hotel, Harrow)
  • 48.  
  • 49.  
  • 50.  
  • 51.  
  • 52.  
  • 53.  
  • 54.  
  • 55.  
  • 56.
    • Pub went from 2 kegs to 20 kegs a
    • week
    • $250,000 in ticket sales annually
    • 3 new businesses in main street
    • 3 new accommodation businesses
    • Renewed sense of pride and
    • confidence
    • Development of a $700,000
    • I ndigenous Cricket Interpretive Centre
    • Beaut Blokes Weekends – now
    • franchised nationally
    HARROW ACHIEVEMENT
  • 57.  
  • 58.  
  • 59. NINE KEY MESSAGES FROM AUSTRALIAN AND NEW ZEALAND’S USE OF CULTURE, ARTS AND HERITAGE FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
  • 60. 1.Importance of being asset and opportunity obsessive .
  • 61. Communities have deficiencies and needs Communities and it’s citizens have capacities and assets
  • 62.  
  • 63. ‘ Communities have never been built upon their deficiencies. Building community has always depended upon mobilizing the capacities and assets of a people and a place. That is why a map of community assets is necessary if local people are to find the way toward empowerment and renewal.’ (J. McKnight & J. Kretzmann)
  • 64. WE CAN ASK QUESTIONS IN TWO WAYS–   1. What is wrong with our community? What problems can we fix? What are the needs of our community? What is broken? OR   2. What are the strengths and assets of our community? Share a time when you felt our community was at it’s best? What do you value most about our community? What is the essence of our community that makes it unique and strong?
  • 65. 2. Importance of stories as cultural threads in making sense of our world.
  • 66. ‘“ Tell me a story” still comprises four of the most powerful words in history.’ (Pat Conroy, author) ‘ Story telling is the most powerful way to put ideas into the world today’ (Robert McKee)
  • 67. 3.Importance of partnerships between cultural assets and local businesses
  • 68.  
  • 69. Seattle and art walk events
  • 70. 4. Important contribution of public art
  • 71.  
  • 72.  
  • 73.  
  • 74.  
  • 75.  
  • 76.  
  • 77.  
  • 78.  
  • 79.  
  • 80.  
  • 81.  
  • 82.  
  • 83.  
  • 84.  
  • 85.  
  • 86.  
  • 87.  
  • 88.  
  • 89.
    • 5. Importance of community involvement-
    • Value of tourism
    • Visitor/customer service
    • Community engagement
  • 90.  
  • 91. 7. Importance of enhancing our cultural assets
  • 92.  
  • 93.  
  • 94.  
  • 95.  
  • 96.  
  • 97.  
  • 98.  
  • 99.  
  • 100. 7. Importance of mobilising the contribution of young people
  • 101.  
  • 102.  
  • 103.  
  • 104.  
  • 105.  
  • 106.  
  • 107.  
  • 108.  
  • 109.  
  • 110.  
  • 111.  
  • 112.  
  • 113.  
  • 114.  
  • 115.  
  • 116. Three Levels of Madness Level One: r u mad? Projects Level Two: MAD Day (Make a Difference Day) Level Three: r u mad? student foundation
  • 117. ‘ It is an important message to young people that they can do wondrous things’ (Greg Darnieder)
  • 118. 8. Importance of thinking outside the box
  • 119.  
  • 120.  
  • 121.  
  • 122.  
  • 123.  
  • 124.  
  • 125.  
  • 126.  
  • 127.  
  • 128.  
  • 129. Elvis
  • 130. Elvis
  • 131. ‘ If you want to survive in a town of 2000, only half an hour from a major regional centre, you need to be bold and creative. Small business is getting harder. It’s a struggle. Only those who are prepared to think outside the box can survive in our business sector’. (Elvis Parsley, Grapeland, Woodford, Queensland)
  • 132. Elvis
  • 133. Elvis parsley
  • 134. ‘ Everyone has fruit, but what I provide is an atmosphere, a mood and an experience. It takes people back. So many people relate to Elvis tunes. It revives their youth. It’s spiritual. So many visitors share feelings like “the best time I have had in ages”; “it has taken me back to the good old days”; and “you’ve picked my flagging spirits up”. To see ninety year olds dancing and singing amongst the fruit is unbelievable. The experience is deeper than a dollar a bag. There is love, emotion and passion.’ (Elvis Parsley, Grapeland, Woodford, QLD)
  • 135. 9. Importance of multi community and business collaboration
  • 136.  
  • 137. ‘ I will market my neighbour as well as I market myself.’ (Wall Pledge of participating businesses in the Midland Meander Arts Marketing trail)
  • 138. The future is not a result of choices among alternative paths offered by the present, but a place that is created first in mind, next in will, then in activity.
  • 139. ‘ The future is not a place to which we are going; it is a place we are creating. The paths to the future are not found, but made, and the activity of making them changes both the maker and the destination.’ (John Schaar)
  • 140. Contact Details Peter Kenyon Ph: +61 8 6293 1848 Fax: + 61 8 6293 1137 14 Bird Rd, Kalamunda WA 6076   Email for copy of presentation: [email_address] Website for bookshop & newsletter mailing list: www.bankofideas.com.au