Organic Agriculture Principles Jap Asence

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Organic Agriculture Principles Jap Asence

  1. 1. PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES OF ORGANIC AGRICULTURE JAP ASENCE AGRICULTURAL TECHNICIAN I CITY AGRICULTURE OFFICE LOCAL GOVERNMENT OF NAGA CITY
  2. 2. FOOD ISSUES IN THE PHILIPPINES  The Philippines is largely an agricultural country.  Agriculture and agribusiness constitute the backbone of Philippine economy.  Food scarcity and lack of access to food in adequate quantities and of nutritional value are widespread.
  3. 3.  Agribusiness accounts for 71% of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP) while primary agriculture and fisheries contribute about 21%.  Despite the seeming agricultural abundance, the Philippines is locked in a chronic food crisis and food security is central issue.
  4. 4.  These are aggravated by falling incomes, food production that lags behind population growth, land tenure issues, peace and order situations, occurrence of disaster situations, and lopsided investment priorities, which are affecting poverty, hunger and malnutrition
  5. 5. ORGANIC AGRICULTURE  Organic farming is the production of crops and livestock without the use of synthetic chemicals and in-organic fertilizers.
  6. 6. Principles of Organic Agriculture  The Principle of Health - Organic Agriculture should sustain and enhance the health of soil, plant, animal and human as one and indivisible.  The Principle of Ecology - Organic Agriculture should be based on living ecological systems and cycles, work with them, emulate them and help sustain them.
  7. 7.  The Principle of Fairness - Organic Agriculture should build on relationships that ensure fairness with regard to the common environment and life opportunities.  The Principle of Care - Organic Agriculture should be managed in a precautionary and responsible manner to protect the health and well being of current and future generations and the environment.
  8. 8. Principles and Aims 1. To produce food of high nutritional quality in sufficient quantity; 2. To interact in a constructive and life enhancing way with natural systems and cycles; 3. To encourage and enhance biological cycles within the farming systems, involving micro-organisms, soil flora and fauna, plants and animals; 4. To promote the healthy use and proper care of water, water resources and all life therein;
  9. 9. Principles and Aims 5. To enhance the conservation of soil and water, improve soil quality and increase soil fertility; 6. To use organic matter and nutrient elements, within a closed system; 7. To work with materials and substances which can be reused or recycled, either on the farm or elsewhere; 8. To give all livestock conditions of life which allow them to perform the basic aspects of their innate behavior;
  10. 10. Principles and Aims 9. To maintain the genetic diversity including protection of plant and wildlife animals; 10. To minimize all forms of pollution; 11. To allow everyone involved in organic production and processing a quality of life; 12. To foster indigenous and ecological production systems that can produce adequate, safe and nutritious food for local communities
  11. 11. Issue of Genetic Diversity
  12. 12. Hazards of Industrial AgricultureHazards of Industrial Agriculture What are the hazards of industrial agriculture?
  13. 13. Organic Farming: A GrowingOrganic Farming: A Growing TrendTrend Consumer demand for organic farming is rising at 20% per year.  The highest growth is in Argentina, US, and China.  People are growing conscious of adverse effects of industrial agriculture, where there is a focus on maximizing profits at the expense of health and the environment. How do you think industrial agriculture contributes to global warming and water pollution?
  14. 14. Health Risks: IndustrialHealth Risks: Industrial MethodsMethods  Pesticide residues on produce  remain after washing and peeling.  have links to cancer.  Antibiotics we ingest  from plant and animal sources  lead to the development of untreatable superbugs Do you worry about pesticide residues on or antibiotics in your food? Explain.
  15. 15. Additional Health RisksAdditional Health Risks  Plant and animal growth hormones  disrupt endocrine system.  lead to early puberty.  Biological engineering  Unregulated items are virtually invisible in stores.  Manipulation of genetic code could impact health. How do you think genetically modified food might impact your health?
  16. 16. Environmental HazardsEnvironmental Hazards  Environmental hazards comprise air pollution, global warming, and other problems.  Synthetic fertilizers  largest source of nitrous oxide emissions  300 times more toxic than carbon dioxide gases  will affect air pollution and intensify global warming if continued Are you concerned about air pollution in your country? Why or why not?
  17. 17. AuthoritiesAuthorities on Wateron Water PollutionPollution Animal waste, fertilizers, and pesticides leach into soil.  They run off through irrigation and contaminate ground water (large portion of water supply).  They contain nitrates, which cause permanent damage to ground water. Are you concerned about water pollution in your country? Why or why not?
  18. 18. Dead Zones in OceansDead Zones in Oceans  Preponderance of nitrogen in fertilizers  helps crops grow; harms oceans  generates algal overgrowth  Algal overgrowth  depletes oxygen in water  no plant or animal can survive
  19. 19. UnsustainableUnsustainable SoilSoil  Industrial mono-cropping: one crop is planted repeatedly on a single field.  The process relies on the use of synthetic fertilizers.  Mono-cropping kills microorganisms needed to produce soil nutrients.  Infertile soil leads to erosion, unsustainable farmlands, and reduced biodiversity. If mono-cropping is destroying farmlands and biodiversity, what is the alternative?
  20. 20. ViciousVicious CycleCycle  Soil infertility leads to a vicious cycle of fertilizer use.  Increasing fertilizer use leads to environmental hazards.  Increased use of pesticides  Only the fittest pests survive.  Stronger pesticides are then needed. What are the environmental hazards associated with the use of pesticides?
  21. 21. Crop RotationCrop Rotation  Holistic farming techniques  infuse soil with essential nutrients.  ensure different crops are planted every year.  vary the nutrient demand in soil.  create sustainable soil. How does organic farming affect soil?
  22. 22. AnimalAnimal WelfareWelfare  Small-scale organic farms are  less likely to confine livestock to small spaces.  against the use of antibiotics.  Free-range farms  allow animals to roam freely.  reduce stress and susceptibility to disease. How do you feel about confining animals to small spaces in order to produce food?
  23. 23. Advantages Organic farming Fewer workers neededFewer blemishes on crops Produce is cheaper Large numbers of animals kept in ideal conditions Bigger yields from land available Antibiotics use keeps animals healthy Use of hormones increases meat production Soil structure is better Less harmful to environment More birds and insects Animals lead happier lives No harmful chemicals – healthier?
  24. 24. VERMICOMPOSTING FACILITY
  25. 25. Vermicomposting Facility  The vermicomposting facility at the City Nursery started last July, 2011.  The City currently produces 2 tons of vermicast per month . The vermicast has an NPK value of 6.32, classified as an Organic Fertilizer.  We started with 7 Kilos of African Night Crawlers , we now have 60 Kilos.
  26. 26. Vermicomposting Facility  In line with RA 10068 or the Organic Act of 2010, the vermicomposting facility will support the transition from conventional to organic practices.  Our target production for 2013 is 4.0 tons of vermicast per month.
  27. 27. Cabiokid Permaculture Farm in Cabiao, Nueva Ecija
  28. 28. CITY AGRICULTURE OFFICE LOCAL GOVERNMENT OF NAGA CITY J. MIRANDA AVE., CONCEPCION PEQUEÑA, NAGA CITY. TEL. # 473.1479 EMAIL: cago@naga.gov.ph cagonaga@gmail.com

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