Kokology
Into the Depths    We’ve all watched as the unwitting    hero of a horror movie is about to walk    through a darkened hal...
You are in an old, abandoned building for years and have discovered a staircase leading underground. Slowly you make your...
How do you react on hearing the sound of this person? Do you try to search the source ? Is your first instinct to run up ...
Key to ― into the depths‖ Abandoned buildings and underground  rooms are highly symbolic of buried  memories and old psyc...
* The number of steps to the bottom of the stairs indicates the impact of the psychological scars you are bearing.* The ...
Eidetic memoryPhotographic Memory
The word eidetic, referring to extraordinarily detailed and vivid recall not limited to, but especially of, visual images...
 a person with photographic memory will precisely recall visual information, a person with eidetic memory is not limited ...
Andriy Slyusarchuk,a Ukrainian professor from Lviv, has been reported to have memorized up to 30 million places of pi. Al...
John von NeumannHungarian-mathematician could recite exactly word for word any books he had read, including page numbers ...
Sergei Rachmaninov, a composer and pianist can recall a musical score after sight reading  twice
 Stephen Wiltshire is able to draw a skyline in detail after a single helicopter ride
Swami Vivekananda was able to memorize ten volumes of the encyclopedia in only a few days
Kim Peek has memorized over 8600 books and has an  encyclopedic knowledge of geography, music, literature,  history, spor...
Elizabethmemory documents her writing out poetry in a foreign language, of which she had no prior knowledge, years after ...
One type of eidetic memory as observed in children is typified by the ability of an individual to study an image, for app...
Does Eidetic orPhotographic MemoryReally Exist?
Researchers and other scientists said thateidetic memory is a myth because.. The existence of extraordinary  memory skill...
They believe that those people who claim to have an eidetic memory actually simply have a close attention to detail, an a...
Individuals capable of superior memory were tested and many were found not to possess eidetic imageryA study done by Deg...
In his study, chess players were asked to reconstruct certain arrangements of pieces on a chessboard after looking at the...
The initially high performance level of the experts was not due to eidetic imagery; they were simply able to better organ...
Mnemonic Techniques andSpecific Memory Tricks toimprove memory,memorization
ACRONYMS.You form acronyms by using each first letter from a group of words to form a new word. This is particularly usef...
SENTENCES/ACROSTICS. Like acronyms, you use the first letter of each  word you are trying to remember. Instead of  making...
RHYMES & SONGS.   Rhythm, repetition, Do you remember learning the alphabet?   Many children learn the letters of the al...
METHOD OF LOCI   This technique was used by ancient orators to   remember speeches, and it combines the use of   organiza...
Once you have determined your path, imagine yourself walking along it, and identify specific landmarks that you will pass...
 Once you have determined your path and  visualized the landmarks, you are ready to use  the path to remember your materi...
CHUNKING  This is a technique generally used when remembering   numbers, although the idea can be used for   remembering ...
Eidetic psych104
Eidetic psych104
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Eidetic psych104

  1. 1. Kokology
  2. 2. Into the Depths We’ve all watched as the unwitting hero of a horror movie is about to walk through a darkened hallway and wanted to yell. ― don’t go in there! Are you crazy?‖ but what well you do if it was you? The next scenario leads us into that dark world, where the line of simple thrills and actual fear is blurred.
  3. 3. You are in an old, abandoned building for years and have discovered a staircase leading underground. Slowly you make your way down. Counting the step as you go. One step…two…how many steps is it to the bottom of the stairs?The underground room is pitch black. Then, from the darkness you hear the from one another. Is the person weeping softly. Moaning wordlessly? Or is it a voice speaking it to you
  4. 4. How do you react on hearing the sound of this person? Do you try to search the source ? Is your first instinct to run up without looking back? Or are you paralyzed with fear and frozen where you are standing.You hear a person now calling your name and see a figure descending from the light at the top of the stairs. Who is that person coming down the stairs?
  5. 5. Key to ― into the depths‖ Abandoned buildings and underground rooms are highly symbolic of buried memories and old psychological scars. All of us have had an experience we’d rather not recall or a heart-break we thought we’d forgotten. But the memory is not so easily erased, and the things we hoped to forget linger for longer than we’d like to admit. Your responses to this situation show how you deal with painful memories of the past.
  6. 6. * The number of steps to the bottom of the stairs indicates the impact of the psychological scars you are bearing.* The sounds you heard out of the darkness reveal how you got through bad experiences in your past.* Your reactions to the sounds in the darkness shows how you deal with painful aspects of you own past* The person who appeared at the top of the stairs calling your name is someone you feel you can rely on in times of trouble.
  7. 7. Eidetic memoryPhotographic Memory
  8. 8. The word eidetic, referring to extraordinarily detailed and vivid recall not limited to, but especially of, visual images,Come from the Greek word εἶδος (pronounced [êːdos eidos, "seen") ] ], is a medical term, popularly defined as the ability to recall images, sounds, or objects in memory with extreme precision and in abundant volume.
  9. 9.  a person with photographic memory will precisely recall visual information, a person with eidetic memory is not limited to merely visual recall – theoretically they can recall other aspects of the event including sensory information that is visual, auditory, tactile, gustatory, and olfactory, as well as other dimensions.
  10. 10. Andriy Slyusarchuk,a Ukrainian professor from Lviv, has been reported to have memorized up to 30 million places of pi. Although he did not recite them all, the reports stated that he could recite any randomly selected sequencesAkira Haraguchi became the person to recite the first 83,431 decimal integers of pi from his memory in July 2, 2005.
  11. 11. John von NeumannHungarian-mathematician could recite exactly word for word any books he had read, including page numbers and footnotes - even of books he had read decades earlier.
  12. 12. Sergei Rachmaninov, a composer and pianist can recall a musical score after sight reading twice
  13. 13.  Stephen Wiltshire is able to draw a skyline in detail after a single helicopter ride
  14. 14. Swami Vivekananda was able to memorize ten volumes of the encyclopedia in only a few days
  15. 15. Kim Peek has memorized over 8600 books and has an encyclopedic knowledge of geography, music, literature, history, sports and 9 other subjects. Kim Peek is able to read extremely rapidly by simultaneously scanning 1 page with the left eye while scanning the other page with the right eye.
  16. 16. Elizabethmemory documents her writing out poetry in a foreign language, of which she had no prior knowledge, years after seeing the original text Using her right eye, she looked for several minutes at a 100 x 100 grid of apparently random dots — 10,000 dots in all. The next day, using her left eye, she looked at a second grid of 100 x 100 dots. She then mentally merged this grid with the remembered one into a 3-D image that most people needed a stereoscopic viewer and both grids to see. Reportedly she could recall eidetic images of a million dots for as much as four hours.
  17. 17. One type of eidetic memory as observed in children is typified by the ability of an individual to study an image, for approximately 30 seconds, and maintain a nearly perfect photographic memory of that image for a short time once it has been removed—indeed such eidetickers claim to "see" the image on the blank canvas as vividly and in as perfect detail as if it were still there.
  18. 18. Does Eidetic orPhotographic MemoryReally Exist?
  19. 19. Researchers and other scientists said thateidetic memory is a myth because.. The existence of extraordinary memory skills is reasonably well- documented, and appears to result from a combination of innate skills, learned tactics, and extraordinary knowledge bases
  20. 20. They believe that those people who claim to have an eidetic memory actually simply have a close attention to detail, an ability to recall things more vividly than others and a set of tricks that increases their ability to remember things
  21. 21. Individuals capable of superior memory were tested and many were found not to possess eidetic imageryA study done by Degroot shows that some individuals are highly skilled at organizing information- not actually reproducing the images they see.
  22. 22. In his study, chess players were asked to reconstruct certain arrangements of pieces on a chessboard after looking at the arrangement for a brief period of time. It was found that the performance level of an expert chess player would drop to that of a novice when the pieces were arranged in a way that would never actually occur in a game.
  23. 23. The initially high performance level of the experts was not due to eidetic imagery; they were simply able to better organize and therefore remember the information because the arrangements could be associated with pre-existing knowledge of chess . Although some write off eidetic memory as the ability to organize vast amounts of information, others have found that this ability cannot be used to explain all the cases studied.
  24. 24. Mnemonic Techniques andSpecific Memory Tricks toimprove memory,memorization
  25. 25. ACRONYMS.You form acronyms by using each first letter from a group of words to form a new word. This is particularly useful when remembering words in a specified order. Acronyms are very common in ordinary language and in many fields.For example: LASER (Light Amplification by StimulatedEmission of Radiation).
  26. 26. SENTENCES/ACROSTICS. Like acronyms, you use the first letter of each word you are trying to remember. Instead of making a new word, though, you use the letters to make a sentence. Here are some examples: • My Dear Aunt Sally (mathematical order of operations: Multiply and Divide before you Add and Subtract) • Kings Phil Came Over for the Genes Special (Kingdom, Phylum, Class, Order, Genus, Species)
  27. 27. RHYMES & SONGS.  Rhythm, repetition, Do you remember learning the alphabet?  Many children learn the letters of the alphabet to the tune of "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star." melody, and rhyme can all aid memory.
  28. 28. METHOD OF LOCI  This technique was used by ancient orators to remember speeches, and it combines the use of organization, visual memory, and association. Before using the technique, you must identify a common path that you walk. This can be the walk from your dorm to class, a walk around your house, whatever is familiar. What is essential is that you have a vivid visual memory of the path and objects along it.
  29. 29. Once you have determined your path, imagine yourself walking along it, and identify specific landmarks that you will pass. For example, the first landmark on your walk to campus could be your dorm room, next may be the front of the residence hall, next a familiar statue you pass, etc. The number of landmarks you choose will depend on the number of things you want to remember
  30. 30.  Once you have determined your path and visualized the landmarks, you are ready to use the path to remember your material. This is done by mentally associating each piece of information that you need to remember with one of these landmarks. For example, if you are trying to remember a list of mnemonics, you might remember the first--acronyms--by picturing SCUBA gear in your dorm room (SCUBA is an acronym). You do not have to limit this to a path. You can use the same type of technique with just about any visual image that you can divide into specific sections. The most important thing is that you use something with which you are very familiar.
  31. 31. CHUNKING  This is a technique generally used when remembering numbers, although the idea can be used for remembering other things as well. It is based on the idea that short-term memory is limited in the number of things that can be contained.  When you use "chunking" to remember, you decrease the number of items you are holding in memory by increasing the size of each item. In remembering the number string 64831996, you could try to remember each number individually, or you could try thinking about the string as 64 83 19 96 (creating "chunks" of numbers). This breaks the group into a smaller number of "chunks." Instead of remembering 8

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